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diva2:1394700
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Smartphone App to Promote Healthy Weight Gain, Diet, and Physical Activity During Pregnancy (HealthyMoms): Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial
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2019 (English)In: JMIR Research Protocols, ISSN 1929-0748, E-ISSN 1929-0748, Vol. 8, no 3, article id e13011Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Excessive gestational weight gain is common and associated with adverse outcomes both in the short and long term. Although traditional lifestyle-based interventions have shown to mitigate excess gestational weight gain, little is known about whether mobile Health (mHealth) apps can promote healthy weight gain, diet, and physical activity during pregnancy.

OBJECTIVE: The primary aim of the HealthyMoms trial is to determine the effectiveness of a smartphone app (HealthyMoms) for mitigating excess gestational weight gain during pregnancy. Secondary aims are to determine the effectiveness of the app on dietary habits, physical activity, body fatness, and glycemia during pregnancy.

METHODS: HealthyMoms is a two-arm randomized controlled trial. Women are being recruited at routine visits at the maternity clinics in Linköping, Norrköping and Motala, Sweden. Women are randomized to the control or intervention group (n=150 per group). All women will receive standard care, and women in the intervention group will also receive the HealthyMoms smartphone app.

RESULTS: Recruitment of participants to the trial was initiated in October 2017, and 190 women have so far completed the baseline measurement. The baseline measures are estimated to be finalized in December 2019, and the follow-up measures are estimated to be completed in June 2020.

CONCLUSIONS: This project will evaluate a novel smartphone app intervention integrated with existing maternity health care. If successful, it has great potential to be implemented nationally in order to promote healthy weight gain and health behaviors during pregnancy.

INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): DERR1-10.2196/13011.

Keywords
diet, exercise, gestational weight gain, mobile phone, pregnancy, smartphone, telemedicine
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-163770 (URN)10.2196/13011 (DOI)30821695 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-02-19 Created: 2020-02-19 Last updated: 2020-03-28
diva2:1299772
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Estimation of non-shivering thermogenesis and cold-induced nutrient oxidation rates: Impact of method for data selection and analysis.
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2019 (English)In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 38, no 54, p. 2168-2174, article id S0261-5614(18)32445-2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Since the discovery of active brown adipose tissue in human adults, non-shivering cold-induced thermogenesis (CIT) has been regarded as a promising tool to combat obesity. However, there is a lack of consensus regarding the method of choice to analyze indirect calorimetry data from a CIT study. We analyzed the impact of methods for data selection and methods for data analysis on measures of cold-induced energy expenditure (EE) and nutrient oxidation rates.

METHODS: Forty-four young healthy adults (22.1 ± 2.1 years old, 25.6 ± 5.2 kg/m2, 29 women) participated in the study. Resting metabolic rate (RMR), cold-induced thermogenesis (CIT), and cold-induced nutrient oxidation rates were estimated by indirect calorimetry under fasting conditions during 1 h of cold exposure combining air conditioning (19.5-20 °C) and a water perfused cooling vest set at a temperature of 4 °C above the individual shivering threshold. We applied three methods for data selection: (i) time intervals every 5 min (5min-TI), (ii) the most stable 5-min period of every forth part of the cold exposure (5min-SS-4P), and (iii) the most stable 5-min period of every half part of the cold exposure (5min-SS-2P). Lately we applied two methods for data analysis: (i) area under the curve as a percentage of the baseline RMR (AUC) and; (ii) the difference between EE at the end of the cold exposure and baseline RMR (Last-RMR).

RESULTS: Mean overall CIT estimation ranged from 11.6 ± 10.0 to 20.1 ± 17.2 %RMR depending on the methods for data selection and analysis used. Regarding methods for data selection, 5min-SS-2P did not allow to observe physiologically relevant phenomena (e.g. metabolic shift in fuel oxidation; P = 0.547) due to a lack of resolution. The 5min-TI and 5min-SS-4P methods for data selection seemed to be accurate enough to observe physiologically relevant phenomena (all P < 0.014), but not comparable for estimating over-all CIT and cold-induced nutrient oxidation rates (P < 0.01). Regarding methods for data analysis, the AUC seemed to be less affected for data artefacts and to be more representative in participants with a non-stable energy expenditure during cold exposure.

CONCLUSIONS: The methods for data selection and analysis can have a profound impact on CIT and cold-induced nutrient oxidation rates estimations, and therefore, it is mandatory to unify it across scientific community to allow inter-study comparisons. Based on our findings, 5min-TI should be considered the method of choice to study dynamics (i.e. changes across time) of CIT and cold-induced nutrient oxidation rates, while 5min-SS-4P and AUC should be the method of choice when computing CIT and cold-induced nutrient oxidation rates as a single value.

Keywords
Adaptive thermogenesis, Cold-induced thermogenesis, Energy balance, Indirect calorimetry, Metabolic rate, Obesity
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155814 (URN)10.1016/j.clnu.2018.09.009 (DOI)000492797600024 ()30297258 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness [PTA 12264-1]; Fondo de Investigacion Sanitaria del Instituto de Salud Carlos IIIInstituto de Salud Carlos III [P113/01393]; Retos de la Sociedad [DEP2016-79512-R]; Fondos Estructurales de la Union Europea (

Available from: 2019-03-28 Created: 2019-03-28 Last updated: 2019-11-11
diva2:1333831
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical fitness in relation to later body composition in pre-school children
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, ISSN 1440-2440, E-ISSN 1878-1861, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 574-579Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives

Although physical fitness is considered a marker of health in youth, little is known whether physical fitness in pre-school age is related to later body composition. Thus, this study investigated (i) associations of physical fitness at 4.5 years of age with body composition 12 months later and (ii) whether improvements in physical fitness during the 12-month follow-up were associated with changes in body composition.

Design

This study included 142 children, measured at 4.5 and 5.5 years, from the control group of the MINISTOP trial.

Methods

Physical fitness (cardiorespiratory fitness, lower- and upper-body muscular strength and motor fitness) was measured using the PREFIT test battery. Body composition was assessed using air-displacement plethysmography.

Results

In adjusted regression analyses, greater cardiorespiratory fitness, lower-body muscular strength and motor fitness at 4.5 years were associated with a lower fat mass index at 5.5 years (standardized β= −0.182 to −0.229, p ≤ 0.028). Conversely, greater cardiorespiratory fitness, lower- and upper-body muscular strength as well as motor fitness at 4.5 years of age were associated with a higher fat-free mass index (standardized β = 0.255–0.447, p ≤ 0.001). Furthermore, improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness, lower-body muscular strength and motor fitness during the 12-month follow-up period were associated with decreases in fat mass index and/or % fat mass.

Conclusions

In conclusion, the results of this study provide evidence of the importance of physical fitness early in life. Nevertheless, further studies are needed in order to clarify the influence of physical fitness in the pre-school age with later health outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Fat-free mass; Fat mass; Cardiorespiratory fitness; Muscular strength; Motor fitness; Pre-school
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-158365 (URN)10.1016/j.jsams.2018.11.024 (DOI)000468256300015 ()30573178 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85058494155 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [2012-2883]; Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare [2012-0906]; Bo and Vera Axson John sons Foundation; Karolinska Institutet; Strategic Research Area Health Care Science, Karolinska Institutet/Umed University; Juho Vainio Foundation; Swedish Society of Medicine; County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden; Henning and Johan Throne -Hoist Foundation; Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness [RYC-2010-05957, RYC-2011-09011, BES-2014-068829]

Available from: 2019-07-02 Created: 2019-07-02 Last updated: 2019-11-27Bibliographically approved
diva2:1299768
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical fitness reference standards for preschool children: The PREFIT project.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, ISSN 1440-2440, E-ISSN 1878-1861, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 430-437, article id S1440-2440(18)30911-3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: Reference values are necessary for classifying children, for health screening, and for early prevention as many non-communicable diseases aggravate during growth and development. While physical fitness reference standards are available in children aged 6 and older, such information is lacking in preschool children. Therefore, the purposes of this study were (1) to provide sex-and age-specific physical fitness reference standards for Spanish preschool children; and (2) to study sex differences across this age period and to characterise fitness performance throughout the preschool period.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional.

METHODS: A total of 3179 preschool children (1678 boys) aged 2.8-6.4 years old from Spain were included in the present study. Physical fitness was measured using the PREFIT battery.

RESULTS: Age- and sex-specific percentiles for the physical fitness components are provided. Boys performed better than girls in the cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength, and speed-agility tests over the whole preschool period studied and for the different percentiles. In contrast, girls performed slightly better than boys in the balance test. Older children had better performance in all fitness tests than their younger counterparts.

CONCLUSIONS: Our study provides age- and sex-specific physical fitness reference standards in preschool children allowing interpretation of fitness assessment. Sexual dimorphism in fitness tests exists already at preschool age, and these differences become larger with age. These findings will help health, sport, and school professionals to identify preschool children with a high/very low fitness level, to examine changes in fitness over time, and to analyse those changes obtained due to intervention effects.

Keywords
Cardiorespiratory fitness, Motor skills, Muscular strength, Reference values
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155811 (URN)10.1016/j.jsams.2018.09.227 (DOI)000462416500011 ()30316738 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Ramon y Cajal grant [RYC-2011-09011]; Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness [BES-2014-068829]; Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation [RYC-2011-09011, RYC-2010-05957]; University of Granada, Plan Propio de Investigation 2016, Excellence acti

Available from: 2019-03-28 Created: 2019-03-28 Last updated: 2019-06-28
diva2:934784
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Mobile Phone Based Method to Assess Energy and Food Intake in Young Children: A Validation Study against the Doubly Labelled Water Method and 24 h Dietary Recalls
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2016 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 50-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mobile phones are becoming important instruments for assessing diet and energy intake. We developed the Tool for Energy Balance in Children (TECH), which uses a mobile phone to assess energy and food intake in pre-school children. The aims of this study were: (a) to compare energy intake (EI) using TECH with total energy expenditure (TEE) measured via doubly labelled water (DLW); and (b) to compare intakes of fruits, vegetables, fruit juice, sweetened beverages, candy, ice cream, and bakery products using TECH with intakes acquired by 24 h dietary recalls. Participants were 39 healthy, Swedish children (5.5 +/- 0.5 years) within the ongoing Mobile-based Intervention Intended to Stop Obesity in Preschoolers (MINISTOP) obesity prevention trial. Energy and food intakes were assessed during four days using TECH and 24 h telephone dietary recalls. Mean EI (TECH) was not statistically different from TEE (DLW) (5820 +/- 820 kJ/24 h and 6040 +/- 680kJ/24 h, respectively). No significant differences in the average food intakes using TECH and 24 h dietary recalls were found. All food intakes were correlated between TECH and the 24 h dietary recalls (r = 0.665-0.896, p &lt; 0.001). In conclusion, TECH accurately estimated the average intakes of energy and selected foods and thus has the potential to be a useful tool for dietary studies in pre-school children, for example obesity prevention trials.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2016
Keywords
mobile phones; energy intake; food intake; total energy expenditure; child; DLW; 24 h dietary recall
National Category
Clinical Medicine Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-128982 (URN)10.3390/nu8010050 (DOI)000374589300048 ()26784226 (PubMedID)