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Wikblad, Karin
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 29) Show all publications
Karlsson, A., Arman, M. & Wikblad, K. (2008). Teenagers with type 1 diabetes - a phenomenological study of the transition towards autonomy in self-management. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 45(4), 562-570
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teenagers with type 1 diabetes - a phenomenological study of the transition towards autonomy in self-management
2008 (English)In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, International Journal of Nursing Studies, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 562-570Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Becoming autonomous is an important aspect of teenagers’ psychosocial development, and this is especially true of teenagers with type 1 diabetes. Previous studies exploring the everyday problems of teenagers with diabetes have focused on adherence to self-care management, how self-determination affects metabolic control, and the perception of social support.

Objective: The aim of the study was to elucidate lived experiences, focusing on the transition towards autonomy in diabetes self-management among teenagers with type 1 diabetes.

Design and method: Data were collected using interviews, and a qualitative phenomenological approach was chosen for the analysis.

Participants: Thirty-two teenagers (18 females and 14 males) were interviewed about their individual experiences of self-management of diabetes.

Findings: The lived experiences of the transition towards autonomy in self-management were characterized by the over-riding theme “hovering between individual actions and support of others”. The findings indicate that individual self-reliance and confirmation of others are helpful in the transition process. Growth through individual self-reliance was viewed as a developmental process of making one's own decisions; psychological maturity enabled increased responsibility and freedom; motivation was related to wellbeing and how well the diabetes could be managed. The theme “confirmation of others” showed that parental encouragement increased the certainty of teenagers’ standpoints; peers’ acceptance of diabetes facilitated incorporation of daily self-management activities; support from the diabetes team strengthened teenagers’ self-esteem.

Conclusion: In striving for autonomy, teenagers needed distance from others, but still to retain the support of others. A stable foundation for self-management includes having the knowledge required to practice diabetes management and handle different situations.

Keywords
Teenage diabetes, Adolescence, Self-management, Transition, Autonomy, Caring, Phenomenology
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12935 (URN)10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2006.08.022 (DOI)
Available from: 2008-02-18 Created: 2008-02-18 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Hedov, G., Wikblad, K. & Anneren, G. (2006). Sickness absence in Swedish parents of children with Down's syndrome: Relation to self-perceived health, stress and sense of coherence. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 50(7), 546-552
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sickness absence in Swedish parents of children with Down's syndrome: Relation to self-perceived health, stress and sense of coherence
2006 (English)In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, ISSN 0964-2633, E-ISSN 1365-2788, Vol. 50, no 7, p. 546-552Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The aims of present study were to study sickness absence among Swedish parents of children with Down's syndrome (DS) and to compare their rates of absence with those of control parents. Sickness absence data for 165 DS parents were compared with those for 174 control parents, all data were for the period 1997-2000. Sickness absence rates were also related to parental self-perceived health, stress and sense of coherence. Methods: The self-administrated measures of parental self-perceived health, stress and sense of coherence were compared with the number of days of sickness absence. Results: In about two-thirds of the parents in both the study and the control group, no days of sickness absence were registered. Six of the DS parents had remarkably large numbers of days of sickness absence (more than 100 per year). None of the control parents had such high sickness absence rates. It is speculated that there is a small group (less than 5%) of parents who are more vulnerable to the birth of a child with DS. Apart from these six DS parents, sickness absence was not more frequent among the DS parents than among the control parents. DS parents stayed at home to care for their sick DS child three times more often than control parents did for their non-disabled child. DS fathers took greater responsibility in the care of their temporarily sick child and stayed at home to care for the child even more often than control mothers did. DS parents with sickness periods experienced small deterioration in self-perceived health, significantly higher stress and decreased sense of coherence in comparison with parents without sickness periods. Conclusions: There was a great similarity in sick leave rates due to one's own sickness between DS and control parents, but a small group of DS parents (<5%) may be more vulnerable. DS fathers stayed at home to care for their sick DS child remarkably often. © 2006 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Keywords
Down's syndrome, Health, Parents, Sickness absence, Stress
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-50196 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2788.2006.00810.x (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12
Paley, J., Wiman, E. & Wikblad, K. (2005). Commentary on Wiman E & Wikblad K (2004) Caring and uncaring encounters in nursing in an emergency department. Journal of Clinical Nursing 13, 422-429. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 14(1), 122-23
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Commentary on Wiman E & Wikblad K (2004) Caring and uncaring encounters in nursing in an emergency department. Journal of Clinical Nursing 13, 422-429
2005 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 122-125p. 122-23Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

[No abstract available]

Publisher
p. 122-125
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-45527 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2702.2004.01017.x (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Wiman, E. & Wikblad, K. (2005). Response: Wiman E & Wikblad K (2004) Caring and uncaring encounters in nursing in an emergency department. Journal of Clinical Nursing 13, 422-429. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 14(1), 124-125
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Response: Wiman E & Wikblad K (2004) Caring and uncaring encounters in nursing in an emergency department. Journal of Clinical Nursing 13, 422-429
2005 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 124-125p. 124-125Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Publisher
p. 124-125
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-48259 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2702.2004.01016.x (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Leksell, J., Sandberg, G. & Wikblad, K. (2005). Self-perceived health and self-care among diabetic subjects with defective vision: A comparison between subjects with threat of blindness and blind subjects. Journal of diabetes and its complications, 19(1), 54-59
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-perceived health and self-care among diabetic subjects with defective vision: A comparison between subjects with threat of blindness and blind subjects
2005 (English)In: Journal of diabetes and its complications, ISSN 1056-8727, E-ISSN 1873-460X, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 54-59Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to compare self-perceived health among diabetic patients who experienced threat of blindness with those who had already gone blind. Another aim was to explore different aspects of self-care in relation to self-perceived health among the subjects. Twenty-one diabetic patients under threat of becoming blind and 23 with diabetes-related blindness agreed to participate in the study. The participants were compared with an age- and gender-matched nondiabetic reference group. Self-perceived health was measured using the 63-item Swedish Health-Related Quality of Life Survey (SWED-QUAL) questionnaire. Data on diabetes-related variables were collected from the patient's hospital records. An interview guide was created for measuring dimensions of self-care. Patients with threat of becoming blind showed better self-perceived health than blind patients, but no differences were found in comparison with the Swedish reference group. Blind patients scored lower in 6 of the 13 health domains and they reported more problems with diabetes self-care than patients with threat of becoming blind. One of the 13 health domains, role limitations due to physical health, seemed to be associated with impaired self-care although only a partial understanding could be demonstrated. The results show that blind patients need specific support to cope well with different self-care situations. A great challenge in future research in diabetes is to implement education programs suitable especially for patients who have gone blind because of diabetes. © 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Blindness, Diabetes, Retinopathy, Self-care, Self-perceived health
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-45543 (URN)10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2004.04.002 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Wiman, E. & Wikblad, K. (2004). Caring and uncaring encounters in nursing in an emergency department. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 13(4), 422-429
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Caring and uncaring encounters in nursing in an emergency department
2004 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 422-429Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. Caring is a core characteristic of nursing. Nurses' caring behaviour has been explored in several studies. When caring for trauma patients, the most important caring behaviour must be the procedures associated with lifesaving. However, it is important not to forget the patient's psychological needs. Aim. The aim of this study was to highlight encounters between injured patients and nurses in the trauma team and to explore whether the theory of caring and uncaring encounters in nursing and health care is applicable in emergency care. Data collection and analysis. Data were collected by videotaping caring episodes between slightly injured patients and nurses in the trauma team. Five episodes involving 10 nurses were studied. The analysis was carried out in four steps. First the videotapes were studied several times and then transcribed into narratives, which were reduced into courses of events. These were subsequently classified according to aspects of caring and uncaring. Results. The nurses' verbal and non-verbal communication was poor, and they adopted a wait-and-see policy. A new uncaring aspect, instrumental behaviour, emerged from this poor communication. One of the caring aspects, being dedicated and having courage to be appropriately involved, could not be identified. Most encounters included several aspects of caring and uncaring, but the uncaring aspects predominated. The dominance of uncaring aspects indicates a lack of affective caring behaviour. Conclusion. The result showed that the theory is partly applicable in emergency care. A new aspect, instrumental behaviour emerged. The nurses' behaviour in the five episodes was labelled as uncaring. Authentic nurse-patient encounters are essential in nursing. Relevance to clinical practice. The importance of meeting patients' psychological needs and nurses' affective caring behaviour should be emphasized in trauma care, trauma courses and nursing education. It is necessary to measure the caring behaviour of trauma nurses.

Keywords
Accident and emergency department, Caring behaviours, Nursing care, Nursing theory
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-45750 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2702.2004.00902.x (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Sörensen Duppils, G. & Wikblad, K. (2004). Delirium: behavioural changes before and during the prodromal phase. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 13(5), 609-616
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Delirium: behavioural changes before and during the prodromal phase
2004 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 609-616Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background.  Delirium is an important form of psychopathology in older people and is associated with increased morbidity and functional decline. In the prodromal phase of delirium early symptoms occur, before all criteria have been met.

Aim.  The aim of this study was to delineate behavioural changes before and during the prodromal phase of delirium. That was considered to include the time from the first behavioural change up to the point when all DSM-IV criteria for delirium were met.

Design.  Prospective and descriptive observation study.

Methods.  One hundred and three hip surgery patients (hip fracture and hip replacement) aged ≥ 80 years participated in this study. On admission none of them was delirious or had severe cognitive decline, but 32 patients met the DSM-IV criteria for delirium during the hospital stay. Frequent observations were performed up to delirium onset or 48 hours postoperatively. The observations included 37 items on the patient's state of mind, cognition, activity and behaviour. The first observation on admission was used as a reference and behavioural changes were defined as deviations from this first observation.

Results.  Twenty-one patients out of the 32 who met the DSM-IV criteria (62%, D group) demonstrated behavioural changes before delirium onset, as did 34 (48%, R group) out of the remaining 71 patients. The D group had different and more numerous behavioural changes than the R group. Anxiety was common in both groups. Disorientation and urgent calls for attention were the most frequent changes in the D group. The D group presented a pattern of behavioural changes and early symptoms of the approaching delirium. Six hours immediately before the onset of delirium, the behavioural changes were more numerous and evident.

Conclusions and relevance to clinical practice.  It is necessary to pay attention to each behavioural change in the patients and to be aware of the prodromal phase of delirium in order to prevent its onset and to maintain the patient's well-being.

Keywords
Behavioural change, Delirium, Hip fracture, Hip surgery, Prodromal phase of delirium
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-45699 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2702.2004.00898.x (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Adolfsson, E., Smide, B., Gregeby, E., Fernstrom, L. & Wikblad, K. (2004). Implementing empowerment group education in diabetes. Patient Education and Counseling, 53(3), 319-324
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Implementing empowerment group education in diabetes
Show others...
2004 (English)In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 319-324Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The overall aim was to gain insight into and understand how physicians and nurses view the implementation of empowerment group education (EGE) in diabetes. Prior to the study the physicians and nurses attended a 2-day empowerment workshop. Further, they had implemented the empowerment approach in two groups of patients with type II diabetes. Three to 9 months later they (five physicians and 11 nurses from six family practices) participated in focus group interviews to evaluate the implementation of the EGE. The interviews were audio-taped, transcribed and analysed using the constant comparative method. The main result showed a conflict in roles. The physicians and nurses knew their role in the traditional approach but not with respect to the empowerment approach, which they needed to grow into. At the same time as they started a new way of working, their role had changed from being an expert to being a facilitator. As experts they felt secure, as facilitators they needed support in their educational process. To implement EGE they required support both from the family practice and from a supervisor in direct connection with the EGE. © 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Diabetes, Empowerment, Group education, Primary care
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-45725 (URN)10.1016/j.pec.2003.07.009 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Sandberg, G. & Wikblad, K. (2003). Oral dryness and peripheral neuropathy in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Journal of diabetes and its complications, 17(4), 192-198
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oral dryness and peripheral neuropathy in subjects with type 2 diabetes
2003 (English)In: Journal of diabetes and its complications, ISSN 1056-8727, E-ISSN 1873-460X, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 192-198Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Two common complaints related to diabetes mellitus are oral dryness (xerostomia) and peripheral neuropathy (PN) and there is some evidence of a relationship between them. Therefore, we formulated a hypothesis that type 2 diabetic subjects with xerostomia in our study also exhibited PN. The study included 102 randomly sampled type 2 diabetic patients from a healthcare district in mid-Sweden. Besides clinical and X-ray examinations, patients were asked whether they experienced oral dryness. PN was defined through thorough foot examination and the use of a modified neuropathy symptom score (NSS) and neuropathy disability score (NDS). Other diabetes-related variables were extracted from medical records. More than half of the individuals (53.5%) reported oral dryness and 23.8% were diagnosed with PN. None of the variables in a stepwise regression analysis could explain the variance in oral dryness, besides "pain in the legs," which contributed with 5% to the explanation. Our hypothesis that type 2 diabetic subjects with xerostomia also were affected with PN could not be verified in this study, but the results must be interpreted with caution as relatively few subjects were affected with both oral dryness and PN (13.8%). Further and larger controlled studies are needed before the hypothesis can be definitely rejected. Despite our incomplete understanding about the relation between oral dryness and PN, professionals in oral health as well as in primary health have to strive for increased knowledge in this field. ⌐ 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-28118 (URN)10.1016/S1056-8727(02)00220-9 (DOI)12929 (Local ID)12929 (Archive number)12929 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Sandberg, G. & Wikblad, K. (2003). Oral health and health-related quality of life in type 2 diabetic patients and non-diabetic controls. Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, 61(3), 141-148
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oral health and health-related quality of life in type 2 diabetic patients and non-diabetic controls
2003 (English)In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 141-148Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the present study was to identify factors in oral health and also diabetes-related and socio-economic components that could be associated with the subject's health-related quality of life (HRQL). One-hundred-and-two randomly sampled type 2 diabetic and 102 age-matched and gender-matched non-diabetic subjects from the same residential area were studied cross-sectionally using the SF-36 questionnaire. Although the HRQL profiles were similar in nature, the control subjects indicated a more favorable health status in their HRQL scores than did type 2 diabetic subjects. Certain oral health factors contributed to deterioration of the patient's HRQL. Multiple regression analyses including both groups were used to determine variables explaining variance in the different HRQL domains. Dissatisfaction with teeth and mouth, feeling of dry mouth and poor financial status contributed to about one-fourth of the explanation of the variance in all health domains. Having diabetes played an important role in the domains Physical Functioning, Role functioning-Physical, General Health, and Social Functioning. Age was important for Physical Functioning and Role functioning-Physical. Our study indicates that different factors may be asociated with impaired HRQL, especially among type 2 diabetic subjects, although only a partial understanding of its relation to oral health could be demonstrated.

Keywords
health-related quality of life (HRQL), oral health, type 2 diabetes
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-47781 (URN)10.1080/00016350310002559 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13
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