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Ödman, Pia
Publications (9 of 9) Show all publications
Bøttcher, L., Stadskleiv, K., Berntsen, T., Christensen, K., Korsfelt, Å., Kihlgren, M. & Ödman, P. (2016). Systematic cognitive monitoring of children with cerebral palsy: the development of an assessment and follow-up protocol. Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, 18(4), 304-315
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Systematic cognitive monitoring of children with cerebral palsy: the development of an assessment and follow-up protocol
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2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 304-315Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cerebral palsy (CP) is associated with cognitive impairments, learning difficulties and reduced social participation. Individual assessment is necessary for individually tailored interventions. This paper describes the development of a systematic follow-up programme of cognition, and the challenges of integrating it into the regular follow-up of children with CP. Initiated by the Nordic users‘ organisations, a group of psychologists proposed a protocol of follow-up of cognition in children with CP – the CP Cog. This protocol consists of neuropsychological instruments covering general cognitive functioning, visuospatial and executive functioning. The article presents a natural experiment describing development and implementation of the cognitive protocol in three Scandinavian countries. This introduction illustrates challenges associated with implementation, especially how the success of the protocol hinges on structural backup within the different countries. In conclusion the CP Cog assessment protocol holds the promise of increasing the awareness among habilitation professionals that children with CP are in need of cognitive evaluation and educational support. © 2015 Nordic Network on Disability Research

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2016
Keywords
Cerebral palsy, cognition, interventions, learning difficulties, systematic follow-up
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126601 (URN)10.1080/15017419.2015.1091035 (DOI)2-s2.0-84945218387 (Scopus ID)
Note

Correspondence Address: Bøttcher, L.

Available from: 2016-03-31 Created: 2016-03-31 Last updated: 2017-05-01Bibliographically approved
Domellöf, E., Hedlund, L. & Ödman, P. (2014). Health-related quality of life of children and adolescents with functional disabilities in a northern Swedish county. Quality of Life Research, 23(6), 1877-1882
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health-related quality of life of children and adolescents with functional disabilities in a northern Swedish county
2014 (English)In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 1877-1882Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) studies in children and adolescents with disabilities tend to report lower self-reported health than in the typical population. However, reports are not always consistent and HRQoL appears to vary depending on diagnosis, cultural setting and clinical context. The aim of this study was to explore HRQoL in children and adolescents with various disabilities in Västerbotten County, Sweden.

METHODS: A total of 175 children and adolescents [57 girls, 118 boys; mean age 11.7 years (range 7-17 years)] divided into four different diagnostic groups (intellectual disabilities, autism spectrum disorders, movement disorders and hearing disabilities) participated in the study. The EuroQol Five Dimensions Health Questionnaire, Youth version (EQ-5D-Y) was used as HRQoL measure.

RESULTS: Significant differences in various EQ-5D-Y dimensions between the different diagnostic groups were found, but no differences in overall health status. HRQoL in children and adolescents with hearing disabilities was found similar to the typical child population in Sweden whereas children and adolescents with other diagnoses reported evidently more problems.

CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest that there is an increased risk for children with functional disabilities other than hearing disabilities in northern Sweden to experience difficulties in various health domains and lowered general health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht, 2014
Keywords
Children; Disability; Health-related quality of life; EQ-5D-Y
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105608 (URN)10.1007/s11136-013-0613-4 (DOI)000339280700021 ()
Available from: 2014-02-22 Created: 2014-03-28 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Akerstedt, A., Risto, O., Ödman, P. & Öberg, B. (2010). Evaluation of single event multilevel surgery and rehabilitation in children and youth with cerebral palsy - A 2-year follow-up study. DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION, 32(7), 530-539
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of single event multilevel surgery and rehabilitation in children and youth with cerebral palsy - A 2-year follow-up study
2010 (English)In: DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION, ISSN 0963-8288, Vol. 32, no 7, p. 530-539Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Method. A prospective single-subject study with AB design and 2-year follow-up, included 11 children between 8 and 18 years old with CP, Gross Motor Function Classification System I-III. Visual analyses were used to present physical function with Physical Cost Index (PCI). Descriptive statistics were used to present number of children with a clinically important change in Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM), self-reported walking ability, and HRQOL with child health questionnaire (CHQ). Results. PCI showed a trend of lower energy cost during gait in six children and GMFM was unchanged for 10 children and improved for one child. Walking ability was improved in 10 children. Gait distance increased in all 11. Both physical and psychosocial dimensions of CHQ improved in six of nine (two missing data). Expectations of outcomes were fulfilled in seven and partly fulfilled in four. Satisfaction with care was fulfilled in 10 of 11. Conclusion. Self-reported walking ability improved after multilevel surgery and intensive rehabilitation. This result was partly supported by lower energy cost and improved HRQOL. Expectations and satisfaction were fulfilled for the majority of children.

Keywords
Cerebral palsy, children, multilevel surgery, outcome, life quality, care
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-54403 (URN)10.3109/09638280903180171 (DOI)000274856200002 ()
Available from: 2010-03-12 Created: 2010-03-12 Last updated: 2010-03-12
Ohrvall, A.-M., Eliasson, A.-C., Lowing, K., Ödman, P. & Krumlinde-Sundholm, L. (2010). Self-care and mobility skills in children with cerebral palsy, related to their manual ability and gross motor function classifications. DEVELOPMENTAL MEDICINE AND CHILD NEUROLOGY, 52(11), 1048-1055
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-care and mobility skills in children with cerebral palsy, related to their manual ability and gross motor function classifications
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2010 (English)In: DEVELOPMENTAL MEDICINE AND CHILD NEUROLOGY, ISSN 0012-1622, Vol. 52, no 11, p. 1048-1055Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the acquisition of self-care and mobility skills in children with cerebral palsy (CP) in relation to their manual ability and gross motor function. Method Data from the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) self-care and mobility functional skill scales, the Manual Ability Classification System (MACS), and the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) were collected from 195 children with CP (73 females, 122 males; mean age 8y 1mo; SD 3y 11mo; range 3-15y); 51% had spastic bilateral CP, 36% spastic unilateral CP, 8% dyskinetic CP, and 3% ataxic CP. The percentage of children classified as MACS levels I to V was 28%, 34%, 17%, 7%, and 14% respectively, and classified as GMFCS levels I to V was 46%, 16%, 15%, 11%, and 12% respectively. Results Children classified as MACS and GMFCS levels I or II scored higher than children in MACS and GMFCS levels III to V on both the self-care and mobility domains of the PEDI, with significant differences between all classification levels (p andlt; 0.001). The stepwise multiple regression analysis verified that MACS was the strongest predictor of self-care skills (66%) and that GMFCS was the strongest predictor of mobility skills (76%). A strong correlation between age and self-care ability was found among children classified as MACS level I or II and between age and mobility among children classified as GMFCS level I. Many of these children achieved independence, but at a later age than typically developing children. Children at other MACS and GMFCS levels demonstrated minimal progress with age. Interpretation Knowledge of a childs MACS and GMFCS level can be useful when discussing expectations of, and goals for, the development of functional skills.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2010
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-60893 (URN)10.1111/j.1469-8749.2010.03764.x (DOI)000282688800021 ()
Available from: 2010-10-29 Created: 2010-10-29 Last updated: 2010-10-29
Ödman, P., Richt, B. & Öberg , B. (2009). Parents conceptions of intensive group training. The case of cerebral palsy. Disability and Rehabilitation, 31(4), 293-301
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parents conceptions of intensive group training. The case of cerebral palsy
2009 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 293-301Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose. The aim was to explore what wants and needs intensive group training (IGT) fulfil for parents of children with cerebral palsy (CP) and what problems that may arise due to participation. Methods. A phenomenograpical approach was used. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to elicit information about what participation means to parents. Results. Five overarching categories expressing positive functions of IGT were identified: IGT as knowledge promotion, as a complementary training resource, as a bracket to ordinary life, as a means to promote relations with therapists, and as a leisure-activity. One category: IGT as risk for ill-being expresses perceived problems. Each category is in turn divided into a number of subconceptions-13 conceptions of this kind were identified. Conclusions. The conceptions express positive and negative functions of IGT as perceived by parents. These functions in turn can be considered as reflections of basic wants and needs. The results demonstrate that IGT have a potential to contribute to feelings of enhanced care competence among parents, of being supported and of increased strength and vitality. All parents did not have needs of participation in IGT for themselves. There is also a risk that IGT is experienced as an additional burden and may have negative effects on family-functioning.

Keywords
Cerebral palsy, therapeutics, qualitative research, conductive education, intensive group training
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17159 (URN)10.1080/09638280801945709 (DOI)
Note
This is an electronic version of an article published in:Pia Ödman, Bengt Richt and Birgitta Öberg, Parents’ conceptions of intensive group training. The case of cerebral palsy, 2009, DISABILITY AND REHABILITATION, (31), 4, 293-301.Disability and rehabilitation is available online at informaworld:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09638280801945709Copyright: Taylor Francis http://www.informaworld.com/Available from: 2009-03-12 Created: 2009-03-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Ödman, P. (2007). Intensive training in group for children with Cerebral Palsy: Evaluation from different perspectives. (Doctoral dissertation). : Institutionen för medicin och hälsa
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intensive training in group for children with Cerebral Palsy: Evaluation from different perspectives
2007 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

There is a need of more evidence‐based knowledge of different treatment/training‐approaches for children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) to better describe the objectives of interventions, effects on functioning and fulfilment of health care needs. The general aim of this thesis was to evaluate the effectiveness of intensive training in groups (ITGs) with a habilitation approach and a conductive education approach. In addition, this thesis explored different meanings of participation in ITGs to parents from a parent perspective. This thesis consists of two parts, a quantitative evaluation of the effectiveness of two ITGs (paper I‐III) and a qualitative study exploring parents’ different ways of experiencing ITGs (paper IV). Fifty‐four children, 3‐16 years old, with different types of CP, intellectual capacity and level of gross motor function, participated with their parents in a four weeks ITG with a short‐term and a one‐year follow‐up (paper I‐III). The second sample was strategically composed of parents to 15 children with CP with experiences of ITGs in different settings.

The results showed that the proportion of clinically significant change in gross motor capability, functional skills or self‐reported individualized goal measure didn’t show any major differences between the two ITGs. One period of ITG facilitated small clinical and parent reported improvements in functioning for the short‐term. Nine children out of 54 made a clinically significant improvement in gross motor capability (GMFM‐88 total score); 36 children improved if an improvement in any dimension A‐E was counted for. Twenty‐two children out of 52 improved in one of the domains self‐care, mobility and social function (PEDI Functional Skills). Twenty‐eight parents out of 54 perceived a clinically significant improvement on the self‐reported individualized goal measure. Most individualized goals dealt with motor activities and movement‐related body functions in both ITGs. The self‐reported individualized goal measure was not found to be more sensitive to change than the clinical measures.

The one‐year follow‐up showed that children had a stable level of functioning. No child deteriorated on the clinical measures short‐term and at the one‐year follow‐up. A higher proportion of change was seen in the social function domain at the one‐year follow‐up, indicating a better potential to change in social function than in gross motor function. The majority of children had a high consumption of training delivered by the Child and Youth Habilitation and merely half of the group continued with repeated ITGs. The differences in functional outcome between children continuing with repeated ITGs compared with only customary Child and Youth Habilitation were limited to a higher proportion of improvements in social functioning.

Parents perceived a high service quality in both ITGs. To parents, fulfilment of health care needs was as important as functional outcome. The probability for high service quality was associated with previous experience of the ITG, high expectations of improvements, if expectations and improvements in gross motor capability were achieved and if the child participated in the ITG with the habilitation approach. Therapists in the habilitation approach were more involved in discussions with parents about expectations for the ITG and knowledge exchange than conductors were, indicating more familycenteredness.

The qualitative study points to a variety of parental needs that may be met at ITGs but also indicates some problems that should be addressed. Five overarching meaning categories of ITGs were described: ITGs as knowledge promotion, as a complementary training resource, as a bracket to ordinary life, as building up relations with therapists, and as a leisure‐activity. An additional category – “ITGs as risk for ill‐being” – subsumed different kinds of problems that may arise. Conceptions suggest that ITGs contribute to parents’ improved knowledge, support and well‐being, but ITGs could also negatively influence family‐functioning.

Professionals and parents need to discuss parents’ previous experiences of ITGs, expectations of functional improvements, the functioning of the child and health care needs in order to individualize goals for ITGs and make the objectives for participation clear. There were no major differences in effectiveness between the two ITGs, a habilitation approach and conductive education approach. Various training approaches should be chosen depending on the child’s and family’s needs. In the choice between different training approaches it is of equal importance to acknowledge functional needs of the child as well as health care needs of the child and parent.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institutionen för medicin och hälsa, 2007
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1008
Keywords
Cerebral Palsy (CP), children, rehabilitation, Early Intervention (Education), Exercise therapy, Goals, Parents
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-11046 (URN)978-91-85831-15-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2007-09-21, Berzeliussalen, Campus US, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2008-02-13 Created: 2008-02-13 Last updated: 2009-05-19
Ödman, P., Krevers, B. & Öberg, B. (2007). Parents´ perception of the quality of two intensive training programmes for children with Cerebral Palsy. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, 49(2), 93-100
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parents´ perception of the quality of two intensive training programmes for children with Cerebral Palsy
2007 (English)In: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 93-100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study explored parents' perceptions of the service quality of two intensive training programmes and the association between perceived service quality and predefined influential factors. Parents of 31 males and 19 females with spastic, dyskinetic, and ataxic cerebral palsy (mean age 8y 7mo [SD 3y 7mo]; range 3–16y), and Gross Motor Function Classification System Level I n=1; Level II n=9; Level III n=8; Level IV n=20; and Level V n=12 were included. Functional outcome had been evaluated previously with the clinical measures Gross Motor Function Measure-88, the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory -Functional Skills, and the Self-reported Individualized Goal Measure, before and after a 4-week intensive training period (ITP). The two training programmes used were Lemo and Move&Walk. After the ITP, a telephone interview was performed with the same cohort, using the Patient perspective On Care and Rehabilitation process. Data on previous experiences, expectations, and severity of disability were collected before the ITP, and data on achieved expectations afterwards. Previous experiences of the training programme, high expectations of improvements, achieved expectations, gross motor capacity improvements, and intensive training at the child and youth rehabilitation centre were associated with increased probability of fulfilment of needs. Severity of disability was associated with decreased probability of fulfilment of needs and functional improvements. Most parents perceived high service quality, and achieved expectations were influenced by high service quality rather than by perceived functional improvements. This suggests that needs other than functional improvements must be explained and acknowledged.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12948 (URN)10.1111/j.1469-8749.2007.00093.x (DOI)
Available from: 2008-02-13 Created: 2008-02-13 Last updated: 2009-05-19
Ödman, P. & Öberg, B. (2006). Effectiveness and expectations of intensive training: a comparison between child and youth habilitation and conductive education. Disability and Rehabilitation, 28(9), 561-570
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effectiveness and expectations of intensive training: a comparison between child and youth habilitation and conductive education
2006 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, Vol. 28, no 9, p. 561-570Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. To compare the effectiveness of two intensive training-programmes from a professional and parent perspective. To describe and compare the type of expectations of the two intensive training programmes with the self-reported individualized goals.

Design. Quasi-experimental with two groups.

Setting and intervention. Traditional health care and conductive education.

Patients and their parents. Fifty-four children with cerebral palsy, 3-16 years old.

Methods. Data included a self-reported individualized goal measure (SRIGM), before and after the ITP. Individualized goals were classified according to the International Classification of Functioning (ICF). Clinical measures (CM) included repeated measures with Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) and Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory—Functional Skills (PEDI-FS).

Results. Twenty-eight parents out of 54 perceived a clinically significant improvement on the SRIGM with no significant difference between the training programmes. Most individualized goals were formulated in the domain of Mobility (115 out of 248) and Neuromusculoskeletal and movement-related functions (64 out of 248 goals) of ICF in both training programmes. There was no difference in the proportion of improvement measured with SRIGM compared to the CM, if an improvement in any dimension in GMFM or domain in PEDI FS was counted.

Conclusion. There were no major differences in outcome and expectations between the training programmes. Parents' expectations were mainly directed towards improvement in prerequisites of motor function and mobility skills. The SRIGM confirmed the outcome on the CM.

Keywords
Evaluation studies; exercise therapy; cerebral palsy; treatment outcome and goals
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12947 (URN)10.1080/00222930500218821 (DOI)
Available from: 2008-02-13 Created: 2008-02-13 Last updated: 2009-06-09
Ödman, P. & Öberg, B. (2005). Effectiveness of intensive training for children with Cerebral Palsy: a comparison between child and youth rehabilitation and conductive education. Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, 37(4), 263-270
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effectiveness of intensive training for children with Cerebral Palsy: a comparison between child and youth rehabilitation and conductive education
2005 (English)In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 263-270Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To compare the short-term effectiveness of 1 intensive training period in child and youth rehabilitation with Move&Walk conductive education and describe the effects of 1 intensive training period in terms of changes at 1 year. The amount and influence of additional consumption of training during the 1-year follow-up was also analysed.

Design: Quasi-experimental with 2 groups: Lemo (n=23) and Move&Walk (n=29).

Patients: A total of 52 children with cerebral palsy, age range 3–16 years.

Methods: Data included repeated measures with Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) and Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory–Functional Skills (PEDI-FS). Data on additional consumption of training was collected at the 1-year follow-up.

Results: There was no difference in proportion of change on the clinical measures between the training programmes, except for a higher proportion of improvement on the GMFM total score in Lemo. At the group level, small improvements were shown on GMFM and PEDI FS in the short-term and on PEDI FS only at 1 year. A higher proportion of children who participated in repeated intensive training periods showed improved social functioning.

Conclusion: No major differences were shown between the 2 training programmes. One intensive training period facilitated small improvements in gross motor function. The majority of children had a high consumption of training during the 1-year follow-up and the added value of repeated intensive training periods was limited.

Keywords
evaluation studies, exercise therapy, cerebral palsy, treatment outcome
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12946 (URN)10.1080/16501970510032622 (DOI)
Available from: 2008-02-13 Created: 2008-02-13 Last updated: 2017-12-13
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