liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 38) Show all publications
Malmqvist, E. & Franssen, T. (2017). Heracles or Icarus: Mythological References in the Human Enhancement Debate. In: Vincent Menuz, Johann Roduit, Daniel Roiz, Alexandre Erler, Natalia Stepanova (Ed.), Future-human.life: (pp. 52-61). Geneva: neohumanitas.org
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heracles or Icarus: Mythological References in the Human Enhancement Debate
2017 (English)In: Future-human.life / [ed] Vincent Menuz, Johann Roduit, Daniel Roiz, Alexandre Erler, Natalia Stepanova, Geneva: neohumanitas.org , 2017, p. 52-61Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Geneva: neohumanitas.org, 2017
National Category
Philosophy Medical Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-139248 (URN)978-3-033-05676-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-07-06 Created: 2017-07-06 Last updated: 2017-08-11Bibliographically approved
Malmqvist, E. & Zeiler, K. (Eds.). (2016). Bodily Exchanges, Bioethics and Border Crossing: Perspectives on Giving, Selling and Sharing Bodies (1ed.). London and New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bodily Exchanges, Bioethics and Border Crossing: Perspectives on Giving, Selling and Sharing Bodies
2016 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Medical therapy, research and technology enable us to make our bodies, or parts of them, available to others in an increasing number of ways. This is the case in organ, tissue, egg and sperm donation as well as in surrogate motherhood and clinical research. Bringing together leading scholars working on the ethical, social and cultural aspects of such bodily exchanges, this cutting-edge book develops new ways of understanding them.

Bodily Exchanges, Bioethics and Border Crossing both probes the established giving and selling frameworks for conceptualising bodily exchanges in medicine, and seeks to develop and examine another, less familiar framework: that of sharing. A framework of sharing can capture practices that involve giving up and giving away part of one’s body, such as organ and tissue donation, and practices that do not, such as surrogacy and research participation. Sharing also recognizes the multiple relationalities that these exchanges can involve and invites inquiry into the context in which they occur. In addition, the book explores the multiple forms of border crossing that bodily exchanges in medicine involve, from the physical boundaries of the body to relational borders – as can happen in surrogacy – to national borders and the range of ethical issues that these various border-crossings can give rise to. 

Engaging with anthropology, sociology, philosophy, and feminist and postcolonical perspectives, this is an original and timely contribution to contemporary bioethics in a time of increasing globalization. It will be of use to students and researchers from a range of humanities and social science backgrounds as well as medical and other healthcare professionals with an interest in bioethics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London and New York: Routledge, 2016. p. 212 Edition: 1
Series
Routledge Studies in the Sociology of Health and Illness
Keywords
Transplantation, Assisted reproductive techniques, Ethics, Organdonationer, Organhandel, Transplantation, Etik och moral
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Medical Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127095 (URN)9781138858763 (ISBN)
Funder
Linköpings universitetRiksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2016-04-13 Created: 2016-04-13 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Malmqvist, E. & Zeiler, K. (2016). Concluding reflections: Bodily exchanges as sharing. In: Erik Malmqvist, Kristin Zeiler (Ed.), Bodily Exchanges, Bioethics and Border Crossing: Perspectives on Giving, Selling and Sharing Bodies (pp. 197-207). London and New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Concluding reflections: Bodily exchanges as sharing
2016 (English)In: Bodily Exchanges, Bioethics and Border Crossing: Perspectives on Giving, Selling and Sharing Bodies / [ed] Erik Malmqvist, Kristin Zeiler, London and New York: Routledge, 2016, p. 197-207Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London and New York: Routledge, 2016
National Category
Philosophy Medical Ethics Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123631 (URN)978-11-3885-876-3 (ISBN)
Funder
Linköpings universitetRiksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2016-01-02 Created: 2016-01-02 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Malmqvist, E. (2016). Does the ethical appropriateness of paying donors depend on what body parts they donate?. Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, 19(3), 463-473
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does the ethical appropriateness of paying donors depend on what body parts they donate?
2016 (English)In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 463-473Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The idea of paying donors in order to make more human bodily material available for therapy, assisted reproduction, and biomedical research is notoriously controversial. However, while national and international donation policies largely oppose financial incentives they do not treat all parts of the body equally: incentives are allowed in connection to the provision of some parts but not others. Taking off from this observation, I discuss whether body parts differ as regards the ethical legitimacy of incentives and, if so, why. I distinguish two approaches to this issue. On a ”principled” approach, some but not all body  parts are inherently special in a way that proscribes payment. On a ”pragmatic” approach, the appropriateness of payment in relation to a specific part must be determined through an overall assessment of e.g. the implications of payment for the health and welfare of providers, recipients, and third parties, and the quality of providers’ consent. I argue that the first approach raises deep and potentially divisive questions about the good life, whereas the second approach invokes currently unsupported empirical assumptions and requires difficult  balancing between different values and the interests of different people. This does not mean that any attempt to distinguish between body parts in regard to the appropriateness of payment necessarily fails. However, I conclude, any plausible such attempt should either articulate and defend a specific view of the good life, or gather relevant empirical evidence and apply defensible principles for weighing goods and interests.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Publishing Company, 2016
Keywords
assisted reproduction, biomedical research, donation, ethics, payment, transplantation
National Category
Medical Ethics Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130715 (URN)10.1007/s11019-016-9705-6 (DOI)000382143600014 ()27115404 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-08-22 Created: 2016-08-22 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Munthe, C., Broström, L., Brülde, B., Cutas, D., Eriksson, S., Helgeson, G., . . . Johansson, M. (2016). Efter skandalen: ”Gråzoner sätt att blanda bort korten”. Svenska Dagbladet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Efter skandalen: ”Gråzoner sätt att blanda bort korten”
Show others...
2016 (Swedish)In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal, News item (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [sv]

Efter skandalen kring kirurgen på Karolinska Institutet som gjorde experimentella operationer, talas det om gråzoner i lagen. Men detta stämmer inte, utan är ett sätt att blanda bort korten, skriver en rad professorer från sex olika universitet gemensamt.

Keywords
research ethics, grey zone, macciarini, forskningsetik, gråzon, macchiarini
National Category
Ethics Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127132 (URN)
Available from: 2016-04-14 Created: 2016-04-14 Last updated: 2017-03-29
Malmqvist, E. (2016). International clinical research and the problem of benefiting from injustice. In: Erik Malmqvist & Kristin Zeiler (Ed.), Bodily exchanges, bioethics and border crossing: perspectives on giving, selling and sharing bodies (pp. 169-184). Abingdon: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>International clinical research and the problem of benefiting from injustice
2016 (English)In: Bodily exchanges, bioethics and border crossing: perspectives on giving, selling and sharing bodies / [ed] Erik Malmqvist & Kristin Zeiler, Abingdon: Routledge, 2016, p. 169-184Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Clinical trials are increasingly “offshored” to developing countries. Many participants in these trials can plausibly be regarded as victims of deep structural injustices, e.g. severe avoidable poverty and lack of access to healthcare. This chapter discusses whether patients who benefit from drugs developed among the global poor have any special responsibility to remedy their unjust circumstances. More precisely, it examines whether such a responsibility can be grounded in the fact that these patients are beneficiaries of injustice. Finding no justification for singling out this group, the author ends by exploring the idea that the responsibility to remedy structural injustice is a more widely shared one. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2016
Series
Routledge Studies in the Sociology of Health and Illness
National Category
Social and Clinical Pharmacy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123629 (URN)9781138858763 (ISBN)
Funder
Linköpings universitet
Available from: 2016-01-02 Created: 2016-01-02 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Malmqvist, E. & Zeiler, K. (2016). Introduction. In: Erik Malmqvist, Kristin Zeiler (Ed.), Bodily Exchanges, Bioethics and Border Crossing: Perspectives on Giving, Selling and Sharing Bodies (pp. 1-18). London and New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction
2016 (English)In: Bodily Exchanges, Bioethics and Border Crossing: Perspectives on Giving, Selling and Sharing Bodies / [ed] Erik Malmqvist, Kristin Zeiler, London and New York: Routledge, 2016, p. 1-18Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London and New York: Routledge, 2016
National Category
Philosophy Medical Ethics Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123630 (URN)978-11-3885-876-3 (ISBN)
Funder
Linköpings universitetRiksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2016-01-02 Created: 2016-01-02 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Malmqvist, E. (2015). Enrolling the global poor in clinical research: What is the essential ethical concern?. In: : . Paper presented at 29th European Conference for the Philosophy of Medicine and Healthcare.19-22 August, 2015 Bioethics Institute, Ghent Blandijnberg 2 Ghent B-9000 Belgium.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enrolling the global poor in clinical research: What is the essential ethical concern?
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127088 (URN)
Conference
29th European Conference for the Philosophy of Medicine and Healthcare.19-22 August, 2015 Bioethics Institute, Ghent Blandijnberg 2 Ghent B-9000 Belgium
Funder
Linköpings universitet
Available from: 2016-04-13 Created: 2016-04-13 Last updated: 2016-04-28
Malmqvist, E. (2015). Exploitation, neglect, and international commercial surrogacy. In: : . Paper presented at Médecine Procreative, Différence Sexuelle et Egalité des Sexes.16 Octobre 2015 Salle Mondrian, 646 A (6e étage) - Université Paris Diderot, bâtiment Condorcet, 4 rue Elsa Morante Paris, France (75013).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploitation, neglect, and international commercial surrogacy
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127092 (URN)
Conference
Médecine Procreative, Différence Sexuelle et Egalité des Sexes.16 Octobre 2015 Salle Mondrian, 646 A (6e étage) - Université Paris Diderot, bâtiment Condorcet, 4 rue Elsa Morante Paris, France (75013)
Available from: 2016-04-13 Created: 2016-04-13 Last updated: 2016-04-28
Malmqvist, E. (2015). Kidney sales and the analogy with dangerous employment. Health Care Analysis, 23(2), 107-121
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kidney sales and the analogy with dangerous employment
2015 (English)In: Health Care Analysis, ISSN 1065-3058, E-ISSN 1573-3394, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 107-121Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Proponents of permitting living kidney sales often argue as follows. Many jobs involve significant risks; people are and should be free to take these risks in exchange for money; the risks involved in giving up a kidney are no greater than the risks involved in acceptable hazardous jobs; so people should be free to give up a kidney for money, too. This paper examines this frequently invoked but rarely analysed analogy. Two objections are raised. First, it is far from clear that kidney sales and dangerous jobs involve comparable risks on an appropriately broad comparison. Second, and more importantly, even if they do involve comparable risks it does not follow that kidney sales must be permitted because dangerous jobs are. The analogy assumes that kidney sales are banned for paternalistic reasons. But there may be other, non-paternalistic reasons for the ban. And paternalists, too, can consistently defend the ban even if kidney sales are no riskier than occupations that they find acceptable. Soft paternalists may want to protect would-be vendors from harms that they have not voluntarily chosen. Egalitarian hard paternalists may want to protect already badly off vendors from further worsening their situation. For neither species of paternalist is the size of the risk prevented decisive. I conclude that the analogy with dangerous jobs, while rhetorically powerful, pulls little real argumentative weight. Future debates on living kidney sales should therefore proceed without it.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2015
Keywords
Analogical reasoning, Ethics, Organ sales, Paternalism, Risks and benefits, Transplantation
National Category
Philosophy Medical Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-108337 (URN)10.1007/s10728-013-0270-3 (DOI)000353287800001 ()24370887 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-06-26 Created: 2014-06-26 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3071-9609

Search in DiVA

Show all publications