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Ödkvist, Lars
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 97) Show all publications
Skogman, B. H., Glimaker, K., Nordwall, M., Vrethem, M., Ödkvist, L. & Forsberg, P. (2012). Long-term Clinical Outcome After Lyme Neuroborreliosis in Childhood. Pediatrics, 130(2), 262-269
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term Clinical Outcome After Lyme Neuroborreliosis in Childhood
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2012 (English)In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 130, no 2, p. 262-269Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To determine long-term clinical outcome in children with confirmed Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB) and to evaluate persistent subjective symptoms compared with a control group. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMETHODS: After a median of 5 years, 84 children with confirmed LNB underwent a neurologic re-examination, including a questionnaire. Medical records were analyzed, and a control group (n = 84) was included. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESULTS: The total recovery rate was 73% (n = 61). Objective neurologic findings, defined as "definite sequelae," were found in 16 patients (19%). The majority of these children had persistent facial nerve palsy (n = 11), but other motor or sensory deficits occurred (n = 5). Neurologic signs and/or symptoms defined as "possible sequelae" were found in another 7 patients (8%), mainly of sensory character. Nonspecific subjective symptoms were reported by 35 patients (42%) and 32 controls (38%) (nonsignificant). Affected daily activities or school performance were reported to the same extent in both groups (23% vs 20%, nonsignificant). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCONCLUSIONS: The long-term clinical recovery rate was 73% in children with confirmed LNB. Persistent facial nerve palsy occurred in 13%, whereas other motor or sensory deficits were found in another 14%. Neurologic deficits did not affect daily activities or school performance more often among patients than controls and should be considered as mild. Furthermore, nonspecific subjective symptoms such as headache, fatigue, or memory or concentration problems were reported as often among patients as controls and should not be considered as sequelae after LNB.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Academy of Pediatrics, 2012
Keywords
Lyme borreliosis, neuroborreliosis, children, clinical outcome, sequelae, facial nerve palsy, persistent symptoms
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-81832 (URN)10.1542/peds.2011-3719 (DOI)000307123000046 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Research Council in Southeast Sweden (FORSS)||County Council in Ostergotland||Center of Clinical Research in Dalarna (CKF)||Swedish Society of Medicine||Lions Foundation||Holmia Foundation||

Available from: 2012-09-25 Created: 2012-09-24 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Kammerlind, A.-S. C., Ledin, T., Ödkvist, L. & Skargren, E. (2011). Recovery after acute unilateral vestibular loss and predictors for remaining symptoms. American Journal of Otolaryngology, 32(5), 366-375
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recovery after acute unilateral vestibular loss and predictors for remaining symptoms
2011 (English)In: American Journal of Otolaryngology, ISSN 0196-0709, E-ISSN 1532-818X, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 366-375Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The aims of this study were to follow recovery during the first 6 months after acute unilateral vestibular loss (AUVL) and to determine predictors for self-rated remaining symptoms. Materials and methods: Forty-two subjects were included less than 10 days after AUVL. Static and dynamic clinical balance tests, visual analogue scales, University of California Los Angeles Dizziness Questionnaire, Dizziness Beliefs Scale, European Quality of Life questionnaire, Dizziness Handicap Inventory, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were performed at inclusion and at 7 follow-ups over 6 months. Subjects rated their symptoms on visual analogue scales daily at home. Videonystagmography was performed in the acute stage and after 10 weeks. Results: Decrease of symptoms and improvement of balance function were larger during the first compared with the latter part of the follow-up period. Visual analogue scale ratings for balance problems were higher than those for dizziness. A prediction model was created based on the results of 4 tests in the acute stage: standing on foam with eyes closed, standing on 1 leg with eyes open, visual analogue scale rating of vertigo at rest, and European Quality of Life questionnaire rating of health-related quality of life. The prediction model identified subjects at risk of having remaining symptoms after 6 months with a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 79%. Conclusions: Recovery mainly takes place during the first weeks after AUVL. Subjects rate more balance problems than dizziness. Self-rated remaining symptoms after 6 months may be predicted by clinical balance tests and subjective ratings in the acute stage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WB Saunders, 2011
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-71109 (URN)10.1016/j.amjoto.2010.07.008 (DOI)000294704200002 ()
Available from: 2011-09-30 Created: 2011-09-30 Last updated: 2017-12-08
Grahn Kronhed, A.-C., Hallberg, I., Ödkvist, L. & Möller, M. (2009). Effect of training on health-related quality of life, pain and falls in osteoporotic women. Advances in Physiotherapy, 11(3), 154-165
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of training on health-related quality of life, pain and falls in osteoporotic women
2009 (English)In: Advances in Physiotherapy, ISSN 1403-8196, E-ISSN 1651-1948, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 154-165Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Physical inactivity is a risk factor for osteoporosis and fractures. The aim of the study was to see if supervised training would improve health-related quality of life (HRQL), reduce pain and falls in osteoporotic women. Women with established osteoporosis (n=124) were invited to a 1-year, follow-up study. Seventy-three women aged 60-81 years met the inclusion criteria and were randomized to an exercise (E) or control (C) group. A 4-month, supervised group training programme was designed. Participants were studied using HRQL questionnaires, clinical tests and dynamic posturography. Thirty-one women in the E-group and 34 women in the C-group completed the study. The E-group improved in six SF-36 domains and mental component summary (MCsum) index and also in worst pain intensity (p<0.01) after the supervised exercise training. Differences were found between the groups when comparing changes in four SF-36 domains, MCsum and worst pain (p=0.001). Physical activity level decreased in the E-group after the supervised period. Mean time to first fall occurred earlier in the C-group than in the E-group for the first 4 months but the trend did not last for the 1-year follow-up. The study suggests that supervised group training is beneficial for women with established osteoporosis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Publisher Informa Healthcare, 2009
Keywords
Elderly; established osteoporosis; exercise; falls; fracture; SF-36; supervision
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-20932 (URN)10.1080/14038190902896659 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-09-25 Created: 2009-09-25 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Kammerlind, A.-S., Ledin, T., Ödkvist, L. & Skargren, E. (2006). Influence of asymmetry of vestibular caloric response and age on balance and perceived symptoms after acute unilateral vestibular loss. Clinical Rehabilitation, 20(2), 142-148
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of asymmetry of vestibular caloric response and age on balance and perceived symptoms after acute unilateral vestibular loss
2006 (English)In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 142-148Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To evaluate the influence of asymmetry of vestibular caloric response and age on balance and perceived symptoms after acute unilateral vestibular loss.

Design: Prospective study.

Setting: Ear, nose and throat departments in three hospitals.

Subjects: Fifty-four patients (mean age 52 years) with acute unilateral vestibular loss participating in a randomized controlled training study were included.

Main measures: Electronystagmography testing was performed within one week after onset of symptoms and after 10 weeks. The outcome measures clinical static balance tests (sharpened Romberg's test with eyes closed, standing on foam with eyes closed, and standing on one leg with eyes open and closed) and subjective symptom ratings on a visual analogue scale were done after one week, 10 weeks and six months. The correlation between age and asymmetry of vestibular caloric response, respectively, and the outcome measures were analysed.

Results: Greater caloric asymmetry correlated with poorer performance at the sharpened Romberg's test and standing on one leg with eyes closed at all three follow-ups (rho=-0.31 to -0.54), and with higher symptom ratings at the 10-week and six-month follow-ups (rho=0.30-0.60). Higher age was associated with poorer performance on the sharpened Romberg's test and standing on one leg at all three follow-ups (rho=0.31-0.64), but did not change over time. Higher age was also associated with higher ratings of vertigo at the six-month follow-up, and less reduction of vertigo between the 10-week and six-month follow-ups (rho=0.29-0.48).

Conclusions: A higher degree of asymmetry of vestibular caloric response and high age seem to be associated with poor outcome in balance and perceived symptoms after acute unilateral vestibular loss.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-33400 (URN)10.1191/0269215506cr886oa (DOI)19416 (Local ID)19416 (Archive number)19416 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Kammerlind, A.-S., Ledin, T., Ödkvist, L. & Skargren, E. (2005). Effects of home training and additional physical therapy on recovery after acute unilateral vestibular loss: a randomized study. Clinical Rehabilitation, 19(1), 54-62
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of home training and additional physical therapy on recovery after acute unilateral vestibular loss: a randomized study
2005 (English)In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 54-62Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To evaluate the effects of additional physical therapy on recovery after acute unilateral vestibular loss given to patients receiving home training.

Design: Randomized controlled trial.

Setting: Ear, nose and throat departments in three hospitals.

Subjects: Fifty-four patients (mean age 52 years) with acute unilateral vestibular loss within the last week confirmed with electronystagmography testing were included. Patients with central neurologic or auditory symptoms or other vertigo disease were excluded.

Interventions: Home training with or without additional physical therapy 12 times during 10 weeks.

Main measures: Electronystagmography testing was performed before and after the training period. Clinical static (Romberg?s test, sharpened Romberg?s test, standing on foam and standing on one leg) and dynamic (walking forward and backward on a line) balance tests and subjective ratings of vertigo and balance problems on a visual analogue scale were done one week, 10 weeks and six months after the start of training.

Results: Similar changes were seen in the two training groups.

Conclusions: No significant differences in outcome regarding balance function or perceived symptoms were found between home training with or without additional physical therapy.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-29391 (URN)10.1191/0269215505cr830oa (DOI)14725 (Local ID)14725 (Archive number)14725 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Sass, K., Ödkvist, L., Anniko, M., Arlinger, S., Barr, B., Bergenius, J., . . . Öhman, H. (2005). Local overpressure treatment reduces vestibular symptoms in Meniere's disease. Svensk ÖNH-tidskrift, 12(1), 28-30
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Local overpressure treatment reduces vestibular symptoms in Meniere's disease
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2005 (English)In: Svensk ÖNH-tidskrift, ISSN 1400-0121, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 28-30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Pressure, Adult, Double-Blind Method, Endolymphatic Hydrops, Humans, Meniere Disease, Middle Aged, Multicenter Studies as Topic, Treatment Outcome, Vestibule, Labyrinth, Homo sapiens, Tryck, Adult, Vuxna, Dubbelblindmetod, Endolymfatisk hydrops, Människa, Menieres sjukdom, Medelvärders personer, Multicenterstudier som ämne, Behandlingsresultat, Vestibule, Vestibularapparat, Homo sapiens, Menieres syndrom, Behandlingsutfall, Vårdresultat
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-99358 (URN)
Available from: 2013-10-16 Created: 2013-10-16 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Thomsen, J., Sass, K., Ödkvist, L. & Arlinger, S. (2005). Local overpressure treatment reduces vestibular symptoms in patients with Ménière's disease: A clinical, randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Otology and Neurotology, 26(1), 68-73
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Local overpressure treatment reduces vestibular symptoms in patients with Ménière's disease: A clinical, randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled study
2005 (English)In: Otology and Neurotology, ISSN 1531-7129, E-ISSN 1537-4505, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 68-73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of a new device, the Meniett, in the treatment of Ménière's disease. The device delivers pressure pulses to the middle ear through a ventilating tube in the tympanic membrane at a frequency of 6 Hz for 0.6 second. After rising to a pressure level of 1.2 kPa, the pressure oscillates between 0.4 and 1.2 kPa. It is believed that the pressure changes are conveyed to the inner ear, inducing a transport of fluids via the pressure outlets and thus reducing the endolymphatic hydrops. Study Design: A clinical, randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. A total of 40 patients were included that had active Méniè re's disease according to American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery criteria, aged between 20 and 65 years, with a history of at least eight attacks during the past year. After insertion of the ventilation tube, the patients should have had attacks of vertigo for 2 months before entering the study. Outcome Measures: Primary study endpoints were change in frequency of vertigo, change of functionality profile, and change in patient perception of vertigo (visual analogue scale), secondary endpoints were perception of tinnitus, aural pressure, and hearing, as well as an audiologic evaluation of hearing before and after the treatment period. Results: The functionality level improved statistically significantly in the active group compared with the placebo group (p = 0.0014), as did the visual analogue scale evaluation of vertigo (p = 0.005). There was a trend toward a reduction of the frequency of vertiginous attacks that was not significant (p = 0.090). With regard to the secondary endpoints, there was no statistical difference between active and placebo groups. Conclusion: Local overpressure treatment is a novel treatment that is noninvasive, nondestructive, and safe. It significantly reduces vestibular symptoms in patients with Ménière's disease. The Meniett was cleared by the Food and Drug Administration in 2000.

Keywords
Ménière's disease, Noninvasive, Pulsed local overpressure, Vertigo
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-45529 (URN)10.1097/00129492-200501000-00012 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Kammerlind, A.-S., Ledin, T., Skargren, E. & Ödkvist, L. (2005). Long-term follow-up after acute unilateral vestibular loss and comparison between subjects with and without remaining symptoms. Acta Oto-Laryngologica, 125(9), 946-953
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term follow-up after acute unilateral vestibular loss and comparison between subjects with and without remaining symptoms
2005 (English)In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 125, no 9, p. 946-953Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Conclusions. About half of the subjects in this study reported remaining symptoms 3–6 years after acute unilateral vestibular loss. Differences could be seen between subjects with and without remaining symptoms regarding health-related quality of life, anxiety and depression.

Objective. To evaluate the presence of self-rated remaining symptoms 3–6 years after acute unilateral vestibular loss, and to compare subjects with and without such symptoms.

Material and methods. Firstly, 51 subjects answered a questionnaire which included the EuroQol EQ-5D, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the University of California Los Angeles Dizziness Questionnaire, visual analogue scales and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory. Secondly, nine subjects with and nine without remaining symptoms participated in an extended testing procedure, including electronystagmography (ENG), determination of vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) and clinical balance tests.

Results. In the first part of the study, 27 subjects reported remaining symptoms, 3 reported 1 additional period of symptoms and 21 had not experienced any symptoms at all in the 3–6 years since acute unilateral vestibular loss. In the second part, the group with remaining symptoms rated a lower health-related quality of life and a higher level of anxiety and depression. There were no differences between the two groups in terms of ENG tests, VEMPs or clinical balance tests.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-29392 (URN)10.1080/00016480510043477 (DOI)14726 (Local ID)14726 (Archive number)14726 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Alkaissi, A., Ledin, T., Ödkvist, L. & Kalman, S. (2005). P6 acupressure increases tolerance to nausogenic motion stimulation in women with high risk for PONV. Canadian Journal of Anesthesia, 52, 703-709
Open this publication in new window or tab >>P6 acupressure increases tolerance to nausogenic motion stimulation in women with high risk for PONV
2005 (English)In: Canadian Journal of Anesthesia, ISSN 1496-8975, Vol. 52, p. 703-709Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: In a previous study we noticed that P6 acupressure decreased postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) more markedly after discharge. As motion sickness susceptibility is increased by, for example, opioids we hypothesized that P6 acu-pressure decreased PONV by decreasing motion sickness susceptibility. We studied time to nausea by a laboratory motion challenge in a group of volunteers, during P6 and placebo acupressure.

Methods: 60 women with high and low susceptibilities for motion sickness participated in a randomized and double-blind study with an active P6 acupressure, placebo acupressure, and a control group (n = 20 in each group). The risk score for PONV was over 50%. The motion challenge was by eccentric rotation in a chair, blindfolded and with chin to chest movements of the head. The challenge was stopped when women reported moderate nausea. Symptoms were recorded.

Results: Mean time to moderate nausea was longer in the P6 acu-pressure group compared to the control group. P6 acupressure = 352 (259–445), mean (95% confidence interval) in seconds, control = 151 (121–181) and placebo acupressure = 280 (161–340); (P = 0.006). No difference was found between P6 and placebo acupressure or placebo acupressure and control groups. Previous severity of motion sickness did not influence time to nausea (P = 0.107). The cumulative number of symptoms differed between the three groups (P < 0.05). Fewer symptoms were reported in the P6 acupressure compared to the control group P < 0.009. Overall, P6 acupressure was only marginally more effective than placebo acupressure on the forearms.

Conclusion: In females with a history of motion sickness P6 acu-pressure increased tolerance to experimental nauseogenic stimuli, and reduced the total number of symptoms reported.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13651 (URN)
Available from: 2004-05-20 Created: 2004-05-20 Last updated: 2009-08-17
Ödkvist, L., Noaksson, L. M., Greibe, P. & Ledin, T. (2004). Neurootology in neck trauma patients. In: Bárány Society XXIII International Congress,2004 (pp. 156-156).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neurootology in neck trauma patients
2004 (English)In: Bárány Society XXIII International Congress,2004, 2004, p. 156-156Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-24723 (URN)6972 (Local ID)6972 (Archive number)6972 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07
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