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Karlsson, Helen
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Publications (10 of 35) Show all publications
Helmfrid, I., Ljunggren, S., Nosratabadi, A. R., Augustsson, A., Filipsson, M., Fredrikson, M., . . . Berglund, M. (2019). Exposure of metals and PAH through local foods and risk of cancer in a historically contaminated glasswork area. Environment International, 131, Article ID UNSP 104985.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exposure of metals and PAH through local foods and risk of cancer in a historically contaminated glasswork area
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2019 (English)In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 131, article id UNSP 104985Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Production of crystal glass and colored art glassware have been going on in the south-eastern part of Sweden since the 1700s, at over 100 glassworks and smaller glass blowing facilities, resulting in environmental contamination with mainly arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and polycyclic hydrocarbons (PAH). High levels of metals have been found in soil, and moderately elevated levels in vegetables, mushrooms and berries collected around the glassworks sites compared with reference areas. Food in general, is the major exposure source to metals, such as Cd and Pb, and PAHs. Exposure to these toxic metals and PAH has been associated with a variety of adverse health effects in humans including cancer.

Objective

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the occurrence of cancer in a cohort from the contaminated glasswork area in relation to long-term dietary intake of locally produced foods, while taking into account residential, occupational and life styles factors.

Methods

The study population was extracted from a population cohort of 34,266 individuals who, at some time between the years 1979–2004, lived within a 2 km radius of a glassworks or glass landfill. Register information on cancer incidence and questionnaire information on consumption of local foods (reflecting 30 years general eating habits), life-time residence in the area, life style factors and occupational exposure was collected. Furthermore, blood (n = 660) and urine (n = 400) samples were collected in a subsample of the population to explore associations between local food consumption frequencies, biomarker concentrations in blood (Cd, Pb, As) and urine (PAH metabolite 1-OHPy) as well as environmental and lifestyle factors. The concurrent exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) from food was also considered. A case-control study was performed for evaluation of associations between intakes of local food and risk of cancer.

Results

Despite high environmental levels of Cd, Pb and As at glasswork sites and landfills, current metal exposure in the population living in the surrounding areas was similar or only moderately higher in our study population compared to the general population. Reported high consumption of certain local foods was associated with higher Cd and Pb, but not As, concentrations in blood, and 1-OHPy in urine. An increased risk of cancer was associated with smoking, family history of cancer, obesity, and residence in glasswork area before age 5 years. Also, a long-term high consumption of local foods (reflecting 30 years general eating habits), i.e. fish and meat (game, chicken, lamb), was associated with increased risk of various cancer forms.

Conclusions

The associations between consumption of local food and different types of cancer may reflect a higher contaminant exposure in the past, and thus, if consumption of local food contributes to the risk of acquiring cancer, that contribution is probably lower today than before. Furthermore, it cannot be ruled out that other contaminants in the food contribute to the increased cancer risks observed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-160953 (URN)10.1016/j.envint.2019.104985 (DOI)000493550200042 ()31319292 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85068874468 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Environmental Protection Agency; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden; Kamprad Family Foundation, Sweden; Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Linkoping University Hospital, Sweden

Available from: 2019-10-16 Created: 2019-10-16 Last updated: 2019-12-04Bibliographically approved
Ljunggren, S., Bengtsson, T., Karlsson, H., Starkhammar Johansson, C., Palm, E., Nayeri, F., . . . Lönn, J. (2019). Modified lipoproteins in periodontitis: a link to cardiovascular disease?. Bioscience Reports, 39(3), Article ID BSR20181665.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modified lipoproteins in periodontitis: a link to cardiovascular disease?
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2019 (English)In: Bioscience Reports, ISSN 0144-8463, E-ISSN 1573-4935, Vol. 39, no 3, article id BSR20181665Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a strong association between periodontal disease and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disorders. A key event in the development of atherosclerosis is accumulation of modified lipoproteins within the arterial wall. We hypothesise that patients with periodontitis have an altered lipoprotein profile towards an atherogenic form. Therefore, the present study aims at identifying modifications of plasma lipoproteins in periodontitis. Lipoproteins from ten female patients with periodontitis and gender- and age-matched healthy controls were isolated by density-gradient ultracentrifugation. Proteins were separated by 2D gel-electrophoresis and identified by map-matching or by nano-LC followed by MS. Apolipoprotein (Apo) A-I (ApoA-I) methionine oxidation, Oxyblot, total antioxidant capacity and a multiplex of 71 inflammation-related plasma proteins were assessed. Reduced levels of apoJ, phospholipid transfer protein, apoF, complement C3, paraoxonase 3 and increased levels of alpha-1-antichymotrypsin, apoA-II, apoC-III were found in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) from the patients. In low-density lipoprotein (LDL)/very LDL (VLDL), the levels of apoL-1 and platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) as well as apo-B fragments were increased. Methionine oxidation of apoA-I was increased in HDL and showed a relationship with periodontal parameters. alpha-1 antitrypsin and alpha-2-HS glycoprotein were oxidised in LDL/VLDL and antioxidant capacity was increased in the patient group. A total of 17 inflammation-related proteins were important for group separation with the highest discriminating proteins identified as IL-21, Fractalkine, IL-17F, IL-7, IL-1RA and IL-2. Patients with periodontitis have an altered plasma lipoprotein profile, defined by altered protein levels as well as post-translational and other structural modifications towards an atherogenic form, which supports a role of modified plasma lipoproteins as central in the link between periodontal and cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Portland Press, 2019
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-157252 (URN)10.1042/BSR20181665 (DOI)000465453700016 ()30842338 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85063936955 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Knowledge Foundation [Dnr20150037]; Foundation Langmanska Kulturfonden; Magnus Bergwalls Foundation

Available from: 2019-06-04 Created: 2019-06-04 Last updated: 2019-06-10Bibliographically approved
Nosratabadi, A. R., Graff, P., Karlsson, H., Ljungman, A. & Leanderson, P. (2019). Use of TEOM monitors for continuous long-term sampling of ambient particles for analysis of constituents and biological effects. Air quality, atmosphere and health, 12(2), 161-171
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Use of TEOM monitors for continuous long-term sampling of ambient particles for analysis of constituents and biological effects
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2019 (English)In: Air quality, atmosphere and health, ISSN 1873-9318, E-ISSN 1873-9326, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 161-171Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many countries have implemented exposure limits for the concentration of ambient particular matter and do therefore have to monitor their concentration. This could be performed with TEOM monitors (Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance-monitors) that contain a filter on which particles are collected. These filters are regularly exchanged for new ones. The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of collecting used filters from monitors at different locations and establishing a method to extract particles and then study them with respect to their ability to generate oxidants, their endotoxin content, and ability to activate inflammatory cells. Filters from nine geographically spread locations in Sweden were collected during a 21-month period by local technicians who then sent them to the laboratory where they were extracted and analyzed. The procedure to let local technicians perform the filter exchange and send used TEOM filters to the laboratory worked well. A method was established in which pyrogen-free water was used to extract particles that then were aliquoted and stored for later analysis. Particulate matter (PM10) from different locations showed both a considerable seasonal and spatial-dependent difference with respect to oxidative potential (oxidize glutathione), endotoxin content, and ability to activate blood monocytes to release interleukin-1β. This study shows that, instead of discarding TEOM filters, they can be collected and extracted so that particles that have been sampled in a standardized way could be analyzed with respect to variables that reflect their toxicity. This could be done at a low cost. In combination with information about the ambient particle concentration, such information could be helpful in the evaluation of differences in the risk of breathing air at various locations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2019
Keywords
Air pollution, TEOM monitor, Ambient particles, Surface reactivity, Endotoxin, Seasonal variation
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154602 (URN)10.1007/s11869-018-0638-5 (DOI)000458121600004 ()2-s2.0-85056389584 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-02-21 Created: 2019-02-21 Last updated: 2019-03-15Bibliographically approved
Ljunggren, S. ., Iggland, M., Rönn, M., Lind, L., Lind, P. M. & Karlsson, H. (2016). Altered heart proteome in fructose-fed Fisher 344 rats exposed to bisphenol A.. Toxicology, 347-349, 6-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Altered heart proteome in fructose-fed Fisher 344 rats exposed to bisphenol A.
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2016 (English)In: Toxicology, ISSN 0300-483X, E-ISSN 1879-3185, Vol. 347-349, p. 6-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bisphenol A (BPA), is an artificial estrogen initially produced for medical purposes but is today widely used in polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Exposure-related reproductive disorders have been found, but recently it has also been suggested that BPA may be involved in obesity, diabetes, myocardial hypertrophy and myocardial infarction in humans. To mimic a modern lifestyle, female rats were fed with fructose or fructose plus BPA (0.25mg/L drinking water). The myocardial left ventricle proteome of water controls, fructose-fed and fructose-fed plus BPA supplemented rats was explored. The proteome was investigated using nano-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry identification. In total, 41 proteins were significantly altered by BPA exposure compared to water or fructose controls. Principal component analysis and cellular process enrichment analysis of altered proteins suggested increased fatty acid transport and oxidation, increased ROS generation and altered structural integrity of the myocardial left ventricle in the fructose-fed BPA-exposed rats, indicating unfavorable effects on the myocardium. In conclusion, BPA exposure in the rats induces major alterations in the myocardial proteome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Bisphenol A; Endocrine disrupting chemicals; Fructose; Heart tissue; Proteomics
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126117 (URN)10.1016/j.tox.2016.02.007 (DOI)000375631700002 ()26930160 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish research council Formas; County Council of Ostergotland (C-ALF); Faculty of Health Sciences in Linkoping

Available from: 2016-03-15 Created: 2016-03-15 Last updated: 2018-03-20
Ali, N., Mattsson, K., Rissler, J., Karlsson, H. M., Svensson, C. R., Gudmundsson, A., . . . Kåredal, M. (2016). Analysis of nanoparticle-protein coronas formed in vitro between nanosized welding particles and nasal lavage proteins.. Nanotoxicology, 10(2), 226-234
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analysis of nanoparticle-protein coronas formed in vitro between nanosized welding particles and nasal lavage proteins.
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2016 (English)In: Nanotoxicology, ISSN 1743-5390, E-ISSN 1743-5404, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 226-234Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Welding fumes include agglomerated particles built up of primary nanoparticles. Particles inhaled through the nose will to some extent be deposited in the protein-rich nasal mucosa, and a protein corona will be formed around the particles. The aim was to identify the protein corona formed between nasal lavage proteins and four types of particles with different parameters. Two of the particles were formed and collected during welding and two were manufactured iron oxides. When nasal lavage proteins were added to the particles, differences were observed in the sizes of the aggregates that were formed. Measurements showed that the amount of protein bound to particles correlated with the relative size increase of the aggregates, suggesting that the surface area was associated with the binding capacity. However, differences in aggregate sizes were detected when nasal proteins were added to UFWF and Fe2O3 particles (having similar agglomerated size) suggesting that yet parameters other than size determine the binding. Relative quantitative mass spectrometric and gel-based analyses showed differences in the protein content of the coronas. High-affinity proteins were further assessed for network interactions. Additional experiments showed that the inhibitory function of secretory leukocyte peptidase inhibitor, a highly abundant nasal protein, was influenced by particle binding suggesting that an understanding of protein function following particle binding is necessary to properly evaluate pathophysiological events. Our results underscore the importance of including particles collected from real working environments when studying the toxic effects of particles because these effects might be mediated by the protein corona.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122249 (URN)10.3109/17435390.2015.1048324 (DOI)000371822800010 ()26186033 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: AFA Insurance and Forte; medical faculty of Lund University; Nanometer Structure Consortium (nmC) at Lund University

Available from: 2015-10-26 Created: 2015-10-26 Last updated: 2017-12-01
Liang, W., Ward, L., Karlsson, H., Ljunggren, S., Li, W., Lindahl, M. & Yuan, X. (2016). Distinctive proteomic profiles among different regions of human carotid plaques in men and women. Scientific Reports, 6(26231)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distinctive proteomic profiles among different regions of human carotid plaques in men and women
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2016 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, no 26231Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The heterogeneity of atherosclerotic tissue has limited comprehension in proteomic and metabolomic analyses. To elucidate the functional implications, and differences between genders, of atherosclerotic lesion formation we investigated protein profiles from different regions of human carotid atherosclerotic arteries; internal control, fatty streak, plaque shoulder, plaque centre, and fibrous cap. Proteomic analysis was performed using 2-DE with MALDI-TOF, with validation using nLC-MS/MS. Protein mapping of 2-DE identified 52 unique proteins, including 15 previously unmapped proteins, of which 41 proteins were confirmed by nLC-MS/MS analysis. Expression levels of 18 proteins were significantly altered in plaque regions compared to the internal control region. Nine proteins showed site-specific alterations, irrespective of gender, with clear associations to extracellular matrix remodelling. Five proteins display gender-specific alterations with 2-DE, with two alterations validated by nLC-MS/MS. Gender differences in ferritin light chain and transthyretin were validated using both techniques. Validation of immunohistochemistry confirmed significantly higher levels of ferritin in plaques from male patients. Proteomic analysis of different plaque regions has reduced the effects of plaque heterogeneity, and significant differences in protein expression are determined in specific regions and between genders. These proteomes have functional implications in plaque progression and are of importance in understanding gender differences in atherosclerosis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2016
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129495 (URN)10.1038/srep26231 (DOI)000376554600001 ()27198765 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Heart Lung Foundation; Linkoping University Hospital Research foundation; Swedish Institute; China Scholarship Council

Available from: 2016-06-20 Created: 2016-06-20 Last updated: 2019-04-17
Sulaiman, W. N., Caslake, M. J., Delles, C., Karlsson, H., Mulder, M. T., Graham, D. & Freeman, D. J. (2016). Does high-density lipoprotein protect vascular function in healthy pregnancy?. Clinical Science, 130(7), 491-497
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does high-density lipoprotein protect vascular function in healthy pregnancy?
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2016 (English)In: Clinical Science, ISSN 0143-5221, E-ISSN 1470-8736, Vol. 130, no 7, p. 491-497Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The maternal adaptation to pregnancy includes hyperlipidaemia, oxidative stress and chronic inflammation. In non-pregnant individuals, these processes are usually associated with poor vascular function. However, maternal vascular function is enhanced in pregnancy. It is not understood how this is achieved in the face of the adverse metabolic and inflammatory environment. Research into cardiovascular disease demonstrates that plasma HDL (high-density lipoprotein), by merit of its functionality rather than its plasma concentration, exerts protective effects on the vascular endothelium. HDL has vasodilatory, antioxidant, anti-thrombotic and anti-inflammatory effects, and can protect against endothelial cell damage. In pregnancy, the plasma HDL concentration starts to rise at 10 weeks of gestation, peaking at 20 weeks. The initial rise in plasma HDL occurs around the time of the establishment of the feto-placental circulation, a time when the trophoblast plugs in the maternal spiral arteries are released, generating oxidative stress. Thus there is the intriguing possibility that new HDL of improved function is synthesized around the time of the establishment of the feto-placental circulation. In obese pregnancy and, to a greater extent, in pre-eclampsia, plasma HDL levels are significantly decreased and maternal vascular function is reduced. Wire myography studies have shown an association between the plasma content of apolipoprotein AI, the major protein constituent of HDL, and blood vessel relaxation. These observations lead us to hypothesize that HDL concentration, and function, increases in pregnancy in order to protect the maternal vascular endothelium and that in pre-eclampsia this fails to occur.

Keywords
apolipoprotein AI; cardiovascular disease; high-density lipoprotein (HDL); pre-eclampsia; pregnancy; vascular function
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126120 (URN)10.1042/CS20150475 (DOI)000371915700003 ()26888561 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies:  Malaysian Ministry of Higher Education; grant EU-MASCARA from the European Commission [278249]; grant sysVASC from the European Commission [603288]

Available from: 2016-03-15 Created: 2016-03-15 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Karlsson, H., Kontush, A. & James, R. W. (2015). Functionality of HDL: Antioxidation and Detoxifying Effects.. Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology, 224, 207-28
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Functionality of HDL: Antioxidation and Detoxifying Effects.
2015 (English)In: Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology, ISSN 0171-2004, E-ISSN 1865-0325, Vol. 224, p. 207-28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High-density lipoproteins (HDL) are complexes of multiple talents, some of which have only recently been recognised but all of which are under active investigation. Clinical interest initially arose from their amply demonstrated role in atherosclerotic disease with their consequent designation as a major cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor. However, interest is no longer confined to vascular tissues, with the reports of impacts of the lipoprotein on pancreatic, renal and nervous tissues, amongst other possible targets. The ever-widening scope of HDL talents also encompasses environmental hazards, including infectious agents and environmental toxins. In almost all cases, HDL would appear to have a beneficial impact on health. It raises the intriguing question of whether these various talents emanate from a basic ancestral function to protect the cell.The following chapter will illustrate and review our current understanding of some of the functions attributed to HDL. The first section will look at the antioxidative functions of HDL and possible mechanisms that are involved. The second section will focus specifically on paraoxonase-1 (PON1), which appears to bridge the divide between the two HDL functions discussed herein. This will lead into the final section dealing with HDL as a detoxifying agent protecting against exposure to environmental pathogens and other toxins.

National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114071 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-09665-0_5 (DOI)25522989 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-02-06 Created: 2015-02-06 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Ljunggren, S. A., Levels, J. H., Hovingh, K., Holleboom, A. G., Vergeer, M., Argyri, L., . . . Karlsson, H. (2015). Lipoprotein profiles in human heterozygote carriers of a functional mutation P297S in scavenger receptor class B1.. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids, 1851(12), 1587-1595
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lipoprotein profiles in human heterozygote carriers of a functional mutation P297S in scavenger receptor class B1.
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2015 (English)In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids, ISSN 1388-1981, E-ISSN 1879-2618, Vol. 1851, no 12, p. 1587-1595Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) is an important HDL receptor involved in cholesterol uptake and efflux, but its physiological role in human lipoprotein metabolism is not fully understood. Heterozygous carriers of the SR-B1P297S mutation are characterized by increased HDL cholesterol levels, impaired cholesterol efflux from macrophages and attenuated adrenal function. Here, the composition and function of lipoproteins were studied in SR-B1P297S heterozygotes.

Lipoproteins from six SR-B1P297S carriers and six family controls were investigated. HDL and LDL/VLDL were isolated by ultracentrifugation and proteins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and identified by mass spectrometry. HDL antioxidant properties, paraoxonase 1 activities, apoA-I methionine oxidations and HDL cholesterol efflux capacity were assessed.

Multivariate modeling separated carriers from controls based on lipoprotein composition. Protein analyses showed a significant enrichment of apoE in LDL/VLDL and of apoL-1 in HDL from heterozygotes compared to controls. The relative distribution of plasma apoE was increased in LDL and in lipid-free form. There were no significant differences in paraoxonase 1 activities, HDL antioxidant properties or HDL cholesterol efflux capacity but heterozygotes showed a significant increase of oxidized methionines in apoA-I.

The SR-B1P297S mutation affects both HDL and LDL/VLDL protein compositions. The increase of apoE in carriers suggests a compensatory mechanism for attenuated SR-B1 mediated cholesterol uptake by HDL. Increased methionine oxidation may affect HDL function by reducing apoA-I binding to its targets. The results illustrate the complexity of lipoprotein metabolism that has to be taken into account in future therapeutic strategies aiming at targeting SR-B1.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
ApoE; ApoL-1; HDL; LDL/VLDL; P297S; SR-B1
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122723 (URN)10.1016/j.bbalip.2015.09.006 (DOI)000364252800008 ()26454245 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: EUs Sixth Framework Program [037631]; European Union [FP7-603091-2]; CardioVascular Research Initiative [CVON2011-16]; Research Council of South East Sweden [FORSS-3755]; County Council of Ostergotland (C-ALF); Faculty of Health Sciences in Linkoping; Ven

Available from: 2015-11-18 Created: 2015-11-18 Last updated: 2018-05-27
Ljunggren, S., Levels, J. H., Turkina, M. V., Sundberg, S., Bochem, A. E., Hovingh, K., . . . Karlsson, H. (2014). ApoA-I mutations, L202P and K131del, in HDL from heterozygotes with low HDL-C. PROTEOMICS - Clinical Applications, 8(3-4), 241-250
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ApoA-I mutations, L202P and K131del, in HDL from heterozygotes with low HDL-C
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2014 (English)In: PROTEOMICS - Clinical Applications, ISSN 1862-8346, E-ISSN 1862-8354, Vol. 8, no 3-4, p. 241-250Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: Mutations in apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) may affect plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels and the risk for cardiovascular disease but little is known about the presence and effects of circulating apoA-I variants. This study investigates whether the apoA-I mutations, apoA-I(L202P) and apoA-I(K131del) , are present on plasma HDL particles derived from heterozygote carriers and whether this is associated to changes in HDL protein composition.

EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Plasma HDL of heterozygotes for either apoA-I(L202P) or apoA-I(K131del) and family controls was isolated using ultracentrifugation. HDL proteins were separated by 2DE and analyzed by MS.

RESULTS: ApoA-I peptides containing apoA-I(L202P) or apoA-I(K131del) were identified in HDL from heterozygotes. The apoA-I(L202P) mutant peptide was less abundant than wild-type peptide while the apoA-I(K131del) mutant peptide was more abundant than wild-type peptide in the heterozygotes. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analyses indicated that, compared to controls, HDL in apoA-I(L202P) carriers contained less apoE and more zinc-α-2-glycoprotein while HDL from the apoA-I(K131del) heterozygotes contained more alpha-1-antitrypsin and transthyretin.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Both apoA-I(L202P) and apoA-I(K131del) were identified in HDL. In heterozygotes, these mutations have markedly differential effects on the concentration of wild-type apoA-I in the circulation, as well as the HDL proteome, both of which might affect the clinical phenotype encountered in the heterozygous carriers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2014
National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105992 (URN)10.1002/prca.201300014 (DOI)000334251600013 ()24273187 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-04-16 Created: 2014-04-16 Last updated: 2018-01-11
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