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Östlin, Johan
Publications (10 of 23) Show all publications
Östlin, J., Sundin, E. & Björkman, M. (2009). Product life-cycle implications for remanufacturing strategies. Journal of Cleaner Production, 17(11), 999-1009
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Product life-cycle implications for remanufacturing strategies
2009 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, Vol. 17, no 11, p. 999-1009Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

For remanufacturing to be successful, there is a need to gain information on future market needs of remanufactured products, and match this to information on the magnitude of return flows. One of the major issues impacting remanufacturing is in the difficulty of obtaining used products (cores) that are suitable for remanufacturing. The timing and quantity of product returns is dependent on the type of product. Factors such as the mean product lifetime, rate of technical innovation, and failure rate of components all influence the return rate of products from end-of-use and end-of-life. The balance between product returns and demand for remanufactured products is a function of many variables, where the rate of technological innovation and the expected life of a product are the major influencing characteristics. The main contribution of this paper is the support that is provided in different supply and demand situations. By using a product life-cycle perspective, the supply and demand situations can be foreseen, and support given regarding possible strategies in these situations.

Keywords
Remanufacturing; Component cannibalization; Product life-cycle; Remanufacturing strategies
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13321 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2009.02.021 (DOI)
Note

Original Publication: Johan Östlin, Erik Sundin and Mats Björkman, Product Lifecycle Implications for Remanufacturing Strategies, 2009, Journal of Cleaner Production, (17), 11, 999-1009. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2009.02.021 Copyright: Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. http://www.elsevier.com/

Available from: 2009-06-12 Created: 2009-03-09 Last updated: 2016-04-12Bibliographically approved
Östlin, J., Sundin, E. & Björkman, M. (2008). Business drivers for remanufacturing. In: Proceedings of CIRP Life Cycle Engineering Seminar , 15th edition, Sidney, Australia. Paper presented at 15th CIRP International Conference on Life Cycle Engineering (pp. 581-586).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Business drivers for remanufacturing
2008 (English)In: Proceedings of CIRP Life Cycle Engineering Seminar , 15th edition, Sidney, Australia, 2008, p. 581-586Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this paper the aim is to explore what drives companies to get involved in the remanufacturing operations. In the previous research there have been numerous case studies that partly have addresses the issue of why a company is getting involved in remanufacturing. A main conclusion from this study is that the motives for remanufacturing a product are very case-dependent e.g. in what industry sector the company have business in and what product type being remanufactured. In this study it is found that there are mainly three general business drivers for remanufacturing. These are: profit, company policy and the environmental drivers. For remanufacturing to be successful, these drivers are crucial, although it does not propose that all of theses drivers have to be present for a successful remanufacturing system. When combining the profit, policy and environmental factors there is a great potential for a win-win-win situation, meaning that the customer gets a quality product at a lower price, the manufacturer reduces their manufacturing costs and the environment gains from a lower environmental impact.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13320 (URN)1877040673 (ISBN)
Conference
15th CIRP International Conference on Life Cycle Engineering
Available from: 2008-05-27 Created: 2008-05-27 Last updated: 2016-04-12
Östlin, J., Sundin, E. & Björkman, M. (2008). Importance of Closed Loop Supply Chain Relationships for Product Remanufacturing. International Journal of Production Economics, 115(2), 336-348
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Importance of Closed Loop Supply Chain Relationships for Product Remanufacturing
2008 (English)In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 115, no 2, p. 336-348Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Remanufacturing is an industrial process where used products are restored (remanufactured) to useful life. In comparison to manufacturing, remanufacturing has some general characteristics that complicate the supply chain and production system. For example, a company must collect the used products from the customers, and thus the timing and quality of the used products are usually unknown. Remanufacturing companies are dependent on customers to return used products (cores). In this paper, seven different types of closed-loop relationships for gathering cores for remanufacturing have been identified. The relationships identified are ownership-based, service-contract, direct-order, deposit-based, credit-based, buy-back and voluntary-based relationships. Building theory around these different types of relationships, several disadvantages and advantages are described in the paper. By exploring these relationships, a better understanding can be gained about the management of the closed-loop supply chain and remanufacturing.

Keywords
Product recovery, Reverse logistics, Relationship marketing
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13322 (URN)10.1016/j.ijpe.2008.02.020 (DOI)
Note
Original Publication: Johan Östlin, Erik Sundin and Mats Björkman, Importance of Closed Loop Supply Chain Relationships for Product Remanufacturing, 2008, International Journal of Production Economics, (115), 2, 336-348. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpe.2008.02.020 Copyright: Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. http://www.elsevier.com/ Available from: 2009-06-14 Created: 2009-03-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Östlin, J., Mähl, M., Sundin, E. & Björkman, M. (2008). Lean Remanufacturing: a Study Regarding Material Flow.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lean Remanufacturing: a Study Regarding Material Flow
2008 (English)Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13324 (URN)
Available from: 2008-05-27 Created: 2008-05-27 Last updated: 2016-04-12
Lindahl, M., Ölundh Sandström, G., Sundin, E., Öhrwall Rönnbäck, A. & Östlin, J. (2008). Learning networks: a method for Integrated Product and Service Engineering - experience from the IPSE project. In: Mamoru Mitsuishi, Kanji Ueda, Fumihiko Kimura. (Ed.), Manufacturing Systems and Technologies for the New Frontier: The 41st CIRP Conference on Manufacturing Systems May 26–28, 2008, Tokyo, Japan (pp. 495-500). London: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning networks: a method for Integrated Product and Service Engineering - experience from the IPSE project
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2008 (English)In: Manufacturing Systems and Technologies for the New Frontier: The 41st CIRP Conference on Manufacturing Systems May 26–28, 2008, Tokyo, Japan / [ed] Mamoru Mitsuishi, Kanji Ueda, Fumihiko Kimura., London: Springer , 2008, p. 495-500Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The aim with the Integrated Product and Service Engineering (IPSE) project is to develop a methodology for companies that want to make the journey of moving from selling products to also sell Integrated Product and Service Offerings. In order to achieve that major changes are needed in the companies. In this paper the learning network approach is described as well as the content of the workshop series that the companies participated in. The findings show that a learning network approach is beneficial methodology for achieving changes in the companies, since the participants learn from each other and from the researchers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Springer, 2008
Keywords
Product Service Systems (PSS), Integrated Product Service Offerings (IPSO)
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-43941 (URN)10.1007/978-1-84800-267-8_102 (DOI)75201 (Local ID)978-1-84800-266-1 (ISBN)978-1-84800-267-8 (ISBN)75201 (Archive number)75201 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2016-04-12Bibliographically approved
Östlin, J. (2008). On Remanufacturing Systems: Analysing and Managing Material Flows and Remanufacturing Processes. (Doctoral dissertation). : Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On Remanufacturing Systems: Analysing and Managing Material Flows and Remanufacturing Processes
2008 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The aim of remanufacturing is to retrieve a product’s inherent value when the product no longer fulfils the user’s desired needs. By taking advantage of this inherent value through different product recovery alternatives, there is a potential for both economically and environmental advantageous recovery of products.

Remanufacturing is a complex business due to the high degree of uncertainty in the production process, mainly caused by two factors: the quantity and the quality of returned products. These factors have implications both on the external processes, e.g. coordinating input of returned products with the demand for remanufactured products, as well as the internal processes that coordinates the operations within the factory walls. This additional complexity needs to be considered when organising the remanufacturing system.

The objective of this dissertation is to explore how remanufacturing companies can become more competitive through analysing and managing material flows and remanufacturing processes.

The first issue discussed in this dissertation is the drivers that make companies interested in remanufacturing products in the first place. The conclusion is that the general drivers are profit, company policy and the environmental drivers. In a general sense, the profit motivation is the most prevalent business driver, but still there are situations where this motivation is secondary to policy and environmental drivers. Secondly, the need to balance the supply of returned products with the demand for remanufactured products shows that the possible remanufacturing volumes for a product are dependent on the shape of the supply and demand distributions. By using a product life cycle perspective, the supply and demand situations can be foreseen and support is given on possible strategies in these different supply and demand situations. Thirdly, how used products are gathered from customers is categorised by seven different customer relationship types. These types all have different effects on the remanufacturing system, and the characteristics of these relationships are disused in detail.

When considering the remanufacturing process within the factory walls, a generic remanufacturing process was developed that divides the remanufacturing process into five different phases; pre-disassembly, disassembly, reprocessing, reassembly and the post-assembly phase. These different phases are separated by three different key decision points in the process that also have a major impact on the material planning of the process. For the remanufacturing material planning and production planning, the possibility to apply lean principles can be difficult. One foundation for implementing lean principles in new production is the existence of standardised processes that are stable and predictable. In the remanufacturing system, the possibilities to realise a predictable process is limited by the “normal” variations in quantity and the quality of the returned cores. Even though lean principles can be problematic to implement in the remanufacturing environment, this dissertation proposes a number of solutions that can be used to make the remanufacturing process leaner.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, 2008
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Dissertations, ISSN 0345-7524 ; 1192
Keywords
Remanufacturing, After Market, Product Recovery, Lean Production, Production Economics
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-11932 (URN)978-91-7393-877-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2008-06-12, C3, Hus C, Campus Valla, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 10:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2008-05-27 Created: 2008-05-27 Last updated: 2009-05-19
Sundin, E., Björkman, M. & Östlin, J. (2008). Product Remanufacturing Facilitated by New Business Strategies. In: Swedish Production Symposium,2008.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Product Remanufacturing Facilitated by New Business Strategies
2008 (English)In: Swedish Production Symposium,2008, 2008Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

More and more companies are striving to expand their business strategies so that revenues and profitability emanates from a larger part of the product life cycle than just the product selling. One way of doing this is to have business offerings consisting of a combination of products and services, and where the selling companies retain the ownership of the physical product. Remanufacturing is often an important means for achieving profitable Product Service Systems. Remanufacturing is an industrial process of returning a used product to at least Original Equipment Manufacturer original performance specification, this from the customers- perspective. The resultant product is also given a warranty that is at least equal to that of a newly manufactured equivalent. Thus, by formulating a business strategy in a life cycle perspective, remanufacturing becomes a service in the product-s life cycle. Remanufacturing can help limit the life cycle costs. It is suggested that up to 85% by weight of remanufactured products may be obtained from used components, and that such products have comparable quality to equivalent new products but require 50% to 80% less energy to produce. It is shown that new business approaches like Product Service System facilitates remanufacturing and vice versa. 

Keywords
Product Service System, Reverse Logistics, Design for Remanufacturing
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-43939 (URN)75199 (Local ID)75199 (Archive number)75199 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2016-04-12
Sundin, E., Östlin, J., Öhrwall Rönnbäck, A., Lindahl, M. & Ölundh Sandström, G. (2008). Remanufacturing of Products used in Product Service System Offerings (1ed.). In: Mamoru Mitsuishi, Kanji Ueda, Fumihiko Kimura (Ed.), Mamoru Mitsuishi, Kanji Ueda, Fumihiko Kimura (Ed.), Manufacturing Systems and Technologies for the New Frontier: . Paper presented at The 41st CIRP Conference on Manufacturing Systems, Tokyo Japan, May 26-28, 2008 (pp. 537-542). London, UK: Springer London
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Remanufacturing of Products used in Product Service System Offerings
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2008 (English)In: Manufacturing Systems and Technologies for the New Frontier / [ed] Mamoru Mitsuishi, Kanji Ueda, Fumihiko Kimura, London, UK: Springer London, 2008, 1, p. 537-542Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

As a product service system provider it is important to consider its benefits and drawbacks. Connecting the product service system with a remanufacturing system has a good potential of being economically and environmentally beneficial. This paper elucidates the case of three different remanufacturers and how their relation with their core provider affects their business. Products sold as a part of a product service system have great potential of being remanufactured in an efficient manner. This is for example due to large possibilities to plan the remanufacturing operations and to achieve pre-information about the cores coming in to the remanufacturing facilities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: Springer London, 2008 Edition: 1
Keywords
Life Cycle, Service Engineering, Reverse Logistics, Case Study
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-43940 (URN)10.1007/978-1-84800-267-8_110 (DOI)000256581900110 ()75200 (Local ID)978-1-84800-266-1 (ISBN)978-1-84800-267-8 (ISBN)75200 (Archive number)75200 (OAI)
Conference
The 41st CIRP Conference on Manufacturing Systems, Tokyo Japan, May 26-28, 2008
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2016-04-12Bibliographically approved
Sundin, E., Östlin, J. & Björkman, M. (2008). Why is Remanufacturing More Successful in the United States than in Sweden?. In: CIRP International Conference on Life Cycle Engineering,2008. Paper presented at 15th CIRP International Conference on Life Cycle Engineering (pp. 247-251).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why is Remanufacturing More Successful in the United States than in Sweden?
2008 (English)In: CIRP International Conference on Life Cycle Engineering,2008, 2008, p. 247-251Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Remanufacturing can be defined as a process of rebuilding a product, during which: the used product is cleaned, inspected and disassembled; defective components are replaced; and the product is reassembled,tested and inspected again to ensure it meets or exceeds newly manufactured product standards. Hence, remanufacturing would not only promote the multiple reuse of materials, but it would also allow for upgrading the quality and the functions of products steadily, without manufacturing completely new products and throwing away used ones. Remanufacturing is often seen as an environmentally sound way of salvaging the resources that are put into products when shaped. The methodology used was to study literature about American and Swedish remanufacturers. In this study,different kinds of success factors for remanufacturing were identified. Secondly, a qualitative research study was performed through visits to remanufacturers and to universities performing remanufacturing research.The interviews show that there are multiple reasons why remanufacturing is advantageous in the United States. These reasons are also dependant on what type of remanufacturing case that is considered. The potential sources identified for remanufacturing success potential in the USA compared to Sweden were cultural behaviour, closeness to a secondary market and a greater focus on price.

Keywords
Reverse Logistics, Cultural Differences; End-of-Life, Life Cycle, Institutional Means
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-43945 (URN)75206 (Local ID)1877040673 (ISBN)75206 (Archive number)75206 (OAI)
Conference
15th CIRP International Conference on Life Cycle Engineering
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2016-04-12
Hermansson, H., Östlin, J. & Sundin, E. (2007). Development of an automatic cleaning process for toner cartridges (1ed.). In: Shozo Takata and Yasushi Umeda (Ed.), Advances in Life Cycle Engineering for Sustainable Manufacturing Business: (pp. 257-261). London: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of an automatic cleaning process for toner cartridges
2007 (English)In: Advances in Life Cycle Engineering for Sustainable Manufacturing Business / [ed] Shozo Takata and Yasushi Umeda, London: Springer , 2007, 1, p. 257-261Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Life cycle engineering deals with technologies for shifting the industry from mass production and mass consumption paradigm to closed loop manufacturing paradigm, in which required functions are provided for customers with the minimum amount of production. This subject is discussed from the various aspects, such as life cycle design, design for environment, reduce/reuse/recycle, life cycle assessment, and sustainable business models.

Advances in Life Cycle Engineering for Sustainable Manufacturing Businesses gathers together papers from the 14th CIRP Life Cycle Engineering Conference. This conference is the longest running annual meeting in the field, in which papers are presented regarding developments of leading edge technologies, proposals of new concepts, and prominent industry case studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Springer, 2007 Edition: 1
Keywords
Remanufacturing; automation; work environment; cleaning; toner cartridge
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-39798 (URN)51244 (Local ID)978-1-84628-934-7 (ISBN)1-846-28-934-3 (ISBN)51244 (Archive number)51244 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2016-04-12Bibliographically approved
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