liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Karlsson, Roger H
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 22) Show all publications
Gerasimov, J., Karlsson, R. H., Forchheimer, R., Stavrinidou, E., Simon, D. T., Berggren, M. & Fabiano, S. (2019). An Evolvable Organic Electrochemical Transistor for Neuromorphic Applications. ADVANCED SCIENCE, 6(7), Article ID 1801339.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Evolvable Organic Electrochemical Transistor for Neuromorphic Applications
Show others...
2019 (English)In: ADVANCED SCIENCE, ISSN 2198-3844, Vol. 6, no 7, article id 1801339Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An evolvable organic electrochemical transistor (OECT), operating in the hybrid accumulation-depletion mode is reported, which exhibits short-term and long-term memory functionalities. The transistor channel, formed by an electropolymerized conducting polymer, can be formed, modulated, and obliterated in situ and under operation. Enduring changes in channel conductance, analogous to long-term potentiation and depression, are attained by electropolymerization and electrochemical overoxidation of the channel material, respectively. Transient changes in channel conductance, analogous to short-term potentiation and depression, are accomplished by inducing nonequilibrium doping states within the transistor channel. By manipulating the input signal, the strength of the transistor response to a given stimulus can be modulated within a range that spans several orders of magnitude, producing behavior that is directly comparable to short- and long-term neuroplasticity. The evolvable transistor is further incorporated into a simple circuit that mimics classical conditioning. It is forecasted that OECTs that can be physically and electronically modulated under operation will bring about a new paradigm of machine learning based on evolvable organic electronics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, 2019
Keywords
conducting polymers; evolvable electronics; neuromorphic; organic electrochemical transistors; organic electronics
National Category
Other Chemical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-156560 (URN)10.1002/advs.201801339 (DOI)000463153100015 ()30989020 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85061035781 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation [2012.0302]; VINNOVA [2015-04859]; Swedish Research Council [2016-03979]; Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research (BioCom Lab) [RIT15-0119]; Marie Sklodowska Curie Individual Fellowship (MSCA-IF-EF-ST, Trans-Plant) [702641]

Available from: 2019-05-15 Created: 2019-05-15 Last updated: 2019-10-25Bibliographically approved
Zhao, D., Wang, H., Ullah Khan, Z., Chen, J. C., Gabrielsson, R., Jonsson, M., . . . Crispin, X. (2016). Ionic thermoelectric supercapacitors. Energy & Environmental Science, 9(4), 1450-1457
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ionic thermoelectric supercapacitors
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Energy & Environmental Science, ISSN 1754-5692, E-ISSN 1754-5706, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 1450-1457Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Temperature gradients are generated by the sun and a vast array of technologies and can induce molecular concentration gradients in solutions via thermodiffusion (Soret effect). For ions, this leads to a thermovoltage that is determined by the thermal gradient Delta T across the electrolyte, together with the ionic Seebeck coefficient alpha(i). So far, redox-free electrolytes have been poorly explored in thermoelectric applications due to a lack of strategies to harvest the energy from the Soret effect. Here, we report the conversion of heat into stored charge via a remarkably strong ionic Soret effect in a polymeric electrolyte (Seebeck coefficients as high as alpha(i) = 10 mV K-1). The ionic thermoelectric supercapacitor (ITESC) is charged under a temperature gradient. After the temperature gradient is removed, the stored electrical energy can be delivered to an external circuit. This new means to harvest energy is particularly suitable for intermittent heat sources like the sun. We show that the stored electrical energy of the ITESC is proportional to (Delta T alpha(i))(2). The resulting ITESC can convert and store several thousand times more energy compared with a traditional thermoelectric generator connected in series with a supercapacitor.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROYAL SOC CHEMISTRY, 2016
National Category
Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-128769 (URN)10.1039/c6ee00121a (DOI)000374351200029 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|European Research Council (ERC) [307596]; Swedish foundation for strategic research (SSF); Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundation (KAW); Swedish Energy Agency; Wenner-Gren Foundations; Advanced Functional Materials Centre at Linkoping University.

The previous status of this article was Manuscript.

Available from: 2016-05-30 Created: 2016-05-30 Last updated: 2018-08-31Bibliographically approved
Ullah Khan, Z., Edberg, J., Max Hamedi, M., Gabrielsson, R., Granberg, H., Wågberg, L., . . . Crispin, X. (2016). Thermoelectric Polymers and their Elastic Aerogels. Advanced Materials, 28(22), 4556-4562
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thermoelectric Polymers and their Elastic Aerogels
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Advanced Materials, ISSN 0935-9648, E-ISSN 1521-4095, Vol. 28, no 22, p. 4556-4562Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Electronically conducting polymers constitute an emerging class of materials for novel electronics, such as printed electronics and flexible electronics. Their properties have been further diversified to introduce elasticity, which has opened new possibility for "stretchable" electronics. Recent discoveries demonstrate that conducting polymers have thermoelectric properties with a low thermal conductivity, as well as tunable Seebeck coefficients - which is achieved by modulating their electrical conductivity via simple redox reactions. Using these thermoelectric properties, all-organic flexible thermoelectric devices, such as temperature sensors, heat flux sensors, and thermoelectric generators, are being developed. In this article we discuss the combination of the two emerging fields: stretchable electronics and polymer thermoelectrics. The combination of elastic and thermoelectric properties seems to be unique for conducting polymers, and difficult to achieve with inorganic thermoelectric materials. We introduce the basic concepts, and state of the art knowledge, about the thermoelectric properties of conducting polymers, and illustrate the use of elastic thermoelectric conducting polymer aerogels that could be employed as temperature and pressure sensors in an electronic-skin.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY-V C H VERLAG GMBH, 2016
National Category
Polymer Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129660 (URN)10.1002/adma.201505364 (DOI)000377123500029 ()26836440 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|European Research Council (ERC) [307596]; Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research; Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation; Swedish Energy Agency; Advanced Functional Materials Center at Linkoping University; Research Institute of Sweden (RISE)

Available from: 2016-06-27 Created: 2016-06-23 Last updated: 2018-09-07
Ullah Khan, Z., Bubnova, O., Jafari, M. J., Brooke, R., Liu, X., Gabrielsson, R., . . . Crispin, X. (2015). Acido-basic control of the thermoelectric properties of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)tosylate (PEDOT-Tos) thin films. Journal of Materials Chemistry C, 3, 10616-10623
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acido-basic control of the thermoelectric properties of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)tosylate (PEDOT-Tos) thin films
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Journal of Materials Chemistry C, ISSN 2050-7526, E-ISSN 2050-7534, Vol. 3, p. 10616-10623Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PEDOT-Tos is one of the conducting polymers that displays the most promising thermoelectric properties. Until now, it has been utterly difficult to control all the synthesis parameters and the morphology governing the thermoelectric properties. To improve our understanding of this material, we study the variation in the thermoelectric properties by a simple acido-basic treatment. The emphasis of this study is to elucidate the chemical changes induced by acid (HCl) or base (NaOH) treatment in PEDOT-Tos thin films using various spectroscopic and structural techniques. We could identify changes in the nanoscale morphology due to anion exchange between tosylate and Cl- or OH-. But, we identified that changing the pH leads to a tuning of the oxidation level of the polymer, which can explain the changes in thermoelectric properties. Hence, a simple acid-base treatment allows finding the optimum for the power factor in PEDOT-Tos thin films.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society of Chemistry, 2015
National Category
Polymer Chemistry Textile, Rubber and Polymeric Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121977 (URN)10.1039/C5TC01952D (DOI)000363251600035 ()
Note

Funding agencies: European Research Council (ERC) [307596]

Available from: 2015-10-14 Created: 2015-10-14 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Zeglio, E., Vagin, M., Musumeci, C., Ajjan, F., Gabrielsson, R., Trinh, X. t., . . . Inganäs, O. (2015). Conjugated Polyelectrolyte Blends for Electrochromic and Electrochemical Transistor Devices. Chemistry of Materials, 27(18), 6385-6393
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conjugated Polyelectrolyte Blends for Electrochromic and Electrochemical Transistor Devices
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 27, no 18, p. 6385-6393Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Two self-doped conjugated polyelectrolytes, having semiconducting and metallic behaviors, respectively, have been blended from aqueous solutions in order to produce materials with enhanced optical and electrical properties. The intimate blend of two anionic conjugated polyelectrolytes combine the electrical and optical properties of these, and can be tuned by blend stoichiometry. In situ conductance measurements have been done during doping of the blends, while UV vis and EPR spectroelectrochemistry allowed the study of the nature of the involved redox species. We have constructed an accumulation/depletion mode organic electrochemical transistor whose characteristics can be tuned by balancing the stoichiometry of the active material.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2015
National Category
Materials Chemistry Condensed Matter Physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122212 (URN)10.1021/acs.chemmater.5b02501 (DOI)000361935000028 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Marie Curie network "Renaissance"; Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundation through Wallenberg Scholar grant; Swedish Research Council [VR-2014-3079, D0556101]; Carl Trygger Foundation [CTS 12:206]

Available from: 2015-10-26 Created: 2015-10-23 Last updated: 2017-12-01
Stavrinidou, E., Gabrielsson, R., Gomez, E., Crispin, X., Nilsson, O., Simon, D. T. & Berggren, M. (2015). Electronic plants. Science Advances, 1(10), 1-8, Article ID e1501136.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Electronic plants
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Science Advances, ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 1, no 10, p. 1-8, article id e1501136Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The roots, stems, leaves, and vascular circuitry of higher plants are responsible for conveying the chemical signals that regulate growth and functions. From a certain perspective, these features are analogous to the contacts, interconnections, devices, and wires of discrete and integrated electronic circuits. Although many attempts have been made to augment plant function with electroactive materials, plants’ “circuitry” has never been directlymerged with electronics. We report analog and digital organic electronic circuits and devices manufactured in living plants. The four key components of a circuit have been achieved using the xylem, leaves, veins, and signals of the plant as the template and integral part of the circuit elements and functions. With integrated and distributed electronics in plants, one can envisage a range of applications including precision recording and regulation of physiology, energy harvesting from photosynthesis, and alternatives to genetic modification for plant optimization.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association for the Advancement of Science, 2015
National Category
Botany Plant Biotechnology Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering Forest Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122880 (URN)10.1126/sciadv.1501136 (DOI)000216599300019 ()
Available from: 2015-11-26 Created: 2015-11-26 Last updated: 2018-03-09
Wang, H., Ail, U., Gabrielsson, R., Berggren, M. & Crispin, X. (2015). Ionic Seebeck Effect in Conducting Polymers. ADVANCED ENERGY MATERIALS, 5(11), Article ID 1500044.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ionic Seebeck Effect in Conducting Polymers
Show others...
2015 (English)In: ADVANCED ENERGY MATERIALS, ISSN 1614-6832, Vol. 5, no 11, article id 1500044Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Conducting polymers display an ionic thermoelectric effect in addition to the known electronic thermoelectric effect. Their Seebeck coefficient is as large as ≈200 μV K−1. This finding discloses a new possible approach to improve the thermoelectric properties of conducting polymers by combining various types of charge carriers of the same sign.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-VCH Verlag, 2015
Keywords
conducting polymers; ionic Seebeck effect; thermoelectric materials
National Category
Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-119790 (URN)10.1002/aenm.201500044 (DOI)000355753300005 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|European Research Council (ERC-Starting-Grant) [307596]; Swedish foundation for strategic research; Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundation; Swedish Energy Agency; Advanced Functional Materials Center at Linkoping University

Available from: 2015-06-26 Created: 2015-06-26 Last updated: 2018-08-20
Persson, K., Lönnqvist, S., Tybrandt, K., Gabrielsson, R., Nilsson, D., Kratz, G. & Berggren, M. (2015). Matrix Addressing of an Electronic Surface Switch Based on a Conjugated Polyelectrolyte for Cell Sorting. Advanced Functional Materials, 25(45), 7056-7063
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Matrix Addressing of an Electronic Surface Switch Based on a Conjugated Polyelectrolyte for Cell Sorting
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Advanced Functional Materials, ISSN 1616-301X, E-ISSN 1616-3028, Vol. 25, no 45, p. 7056-7063Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Spatial control of cell detachment is potentially of great interest when selecting cells for clonal expansion and in order to obtain a homogeneous starting population of cells aimed for tissue engineering purposes. Here, selective detachment and cell sorting of human primary keratinocytes and fibroblasts is achieved using thin films of a conjugated polymer. Upon electrochemical oxidation, the polymer film swells, cracks, and finally detaches taking cells cultured on top along with it. The polymer can be patterned using standard photolithography to fabricate a cross-point matrix with polymer pixels that can be individually addressed and thus detached. Detachment occurs above a well-defined threshold of +0.7 V versus Ag/AgCl, allowing the use of a relatively simple and easily manufactured passive matrix-addressing configuration, based on a resistor network, to control the cell-sorting device.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY-V C H VERLAG GMBH, 2015
National Category
Clinical Medicine Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123754 (URN)10.1002/adfm.201503542 (DOI)000366502900010 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research; VINNOVA (the OBOE center) [2010-00507]; Onnesjo foundation (Holmen); Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Functional Materials at Linkoping University (Faculty Grant SFO-Mat-LiU) [2009-00971]

Available from: 2016-01-11 Created: 2016-01-11 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Khan, Z. U., Edberg, J., Hamedi, M., Gabrielsson, R., Granberg, H., Engquist, I., . . . Crispin, X. (2015). Nanofibrillated cellulose aerogels functionalized with conducting polymers for thermoelectric and dual-sensing applications.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nanofibrillated cellulose aerogels functionalized with conducting polymers for thermoelectric and dual-sensing applications
Show others...
2015 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Large amount of heat is wasted in industries, power generation plants and ordinary household appliances. This waste heat, can be a useful input to a thermoelectric generator (TEG) that can convert it to electricity. Conducting polymers (CPs) have been proved as best suited thermoelectric (TE) materials for lower temperatures, being not toxic, abundant in nature and solution processible. So far, CPs have been characterized as thin films, but it needs the third dimension to realize vertical TEGs which is possible by coating it on low thermal conductivity 3D skeletons. In this work, porous bulk cellulose structures have been used as a supporting material and were coated with CPs in various ways. The blend of cellulose and polymer were also freeze-dried, resulting in conducting and soft composites. Those flexible aerogels were utilized as a dual parameter sensor to sense pressure and temperature, based on the concept of thermoelectricity. It opens another application area of sensing, utilizing the thermoelectric phenomenon beyond the prevailing power generation concept. The sensitivity of such materials can be enhanced to make them useful as electronic skin in healthcare and robotics.

National Category
Physical Sciences Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121981 (URN)
Available from: 2015-10-14 Created: 2015-10-14 Last updated: 2018-02-15Bibliographically approved
Sobkowiak, M., Gabrielsson, R., Inganäs, O. & Milczarek, G. (2014). Amperometric detection of iron (III) on electroconductive hydrogel based on polypyrrole and alkoxysulfonated poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT-S). Synthetic metals, 194, 170-175
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Amperometric detection of iron (III) on electroconductive hydrogel based on polypyrrole and alkoxysulfonated poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT-S)
2014 (English)In: Synthetic metals, ISSN 0379-6779, E-ISSN 1879-3290, Vol. 194, p. 170-175Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A polymeric conducting hydrogel of autopolymerized polypyrrole (PPY) and poly(4-(2,3-dihydrothieno[3,4-b][1,4]dioxin-2-yl-methoxy)-1-butanesulfonic acid (PEDOT-S) cast-deposited on a glassy carbon electrode is demonstrated to be an efficient electrocatalyst for the fairly irreversible, and often irreproducible, reduction of Fe(Ill) at the bare substrate. Sensitive amperometric monitoring of Fe(III) is then possible without the need for oxygen removal at the fairly positive polarization potential of 0.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl in acidic electrolyte (0.1 M HClO4). The sensor shows a linear current response over a concentration range exceeding two orders of magnitude (2.5-500 mu M, R-2 = 0.9998). The detection limit (3 sigma) was estimated to be 0.8 mu M, and the sensitivity factor was 0.28 mu A mu M cm(-2), which is approximately 23 times higher than for the unmodified electrode under the same experimental conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keywords
Polypyrrole; PEDOT-S; Electrocatalysis; Iron(III)
National Category
Biological Sciences Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109368 (URN)10.1016/j.synthmet.2014.04.028 (DOI)000338979300025 ()
Available from: 2014-08-15 Created: 2014-08-15 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications