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Hultsjö, Sally
Publications (10 of 18) Show all publications
Hultsjö, S., Wärdig, R. & Rytterström, P. (2019). The borderline between life and death: Mental healthcare professionals' experience of why patients commit suicide during ongoing care. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 28(9-10), 1623-1632
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The borderline between life and death: Mental healthcare professionals' experience of why patients commit suicide during ongoing care
2019 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 28, no 9-10, p. 1623-1632Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore mental health professionals' experiences in regard to circumstances that cause the patient to take their own life during ongoing care.

BACKGROUND: Suicide is a worldwide health problem, and of those who take their own life, nearly 20% have had contact with a psychiatric unit. Mental health professionals may have extended intuitive knowledge that has not been made visible. Mental health professionals' experiences can contribute knowledge that can complement suicide risk assessments and can be helpful in developing approaches and strategies where the hope is to identify and draw attention to people at risk of taking their own life.

DESIGN: A reflective lifeworld research.

METHODS: Twelve interviews with mental health professionals with experience of working in caring relationships with patients that had taken their life during the period of care. The study was performed in accordance with COREQ (see Supporting Information Data S1).

RESULTS: Mental health professionals' experiences regarding circumstances that cause the patient to take their own life are related to the patient's life circumstances that led to a loss of dignity, and finally beyond retrieval. Mental health professionals share patients' struggle to choose between life and death, the darkness of their life and their hopeless situation. This shared experience also makes the mental health professionals wish to relieve patient's suffering but also gives them an understanding of why patients take their own life.

CONCLUSIONS: The mental health professionals experience how the patient loses the possibility of living a worthwhile life, recognise darkness within the patient and see how the patient's life is fragile. Suicide described as logical and expected, based on their life and life circumstances, has not been found in previous research. Bearing this in mind, should psychiatric care focus on a proactive approach and act when these circumstances are identified?

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The Mental health professionals' tacit knowledge may be used to strengthen uncertain suicide assessments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
experiences, nursing, phenomenology, qualitative interviews, suicide
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154918 (URN)10.1111/jocn.14754 (DOI)000468589500024 ()30589485 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Futurum - the academy for health and care; Department of Psychiatry, Jonkoping, Ryhov County Council; Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden

Available from: 2019-03-05 Created: 2019-03-05 Last updated: 2019-08-20
Atwine, F., Hultsjö, S., Albin, B. & Hjelm, K. (2015). Health-care seeking behaviour and the use of traditional medicine among persons with type 2 diabetes in south-western Uganda: a study of focus group interviews. Pan African Medical Journal, 20(76)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health-care seeking behaviour and the use of traditional medicine among persons with type 2 diabetes in south-western Uganda: a study of focus group interviews
2015 (English)In: Pan African Medical Journal, ISSN 1937-8688, E-ISSN 1937-8688, Vol. 20, no 76Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: health-care seeking behaviour is important as it determines acceptance of health care and outcomes of chronic conditions but it has been investigated to a limited extent among persons with diabetes in developing countries. The purpose of the study was to describe health-care seeking behaviour and understand reasons for using therapies offered by traditional healers.

Methods: descriptive study using focus-group interviews. Three purposive focus-groups were conducted in 2011 of 10 women and 7 men aged 39–72 years in Uganda. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and qualitatively analysed according to a method described for focus-groups.

Results: reasons for seeking help from traditional healers were symptoms related to diabetes such as polydipsia, fatigue and decreased sensitivity in lower limbs. Failure of effect from western medicine was also reported. Treatment was described to be unknown extracts, of locally made products taken as herbs or food, and participants had sought help from different health facilities with the help of relatives and friends.

Conclusion: the pattern of seeking care was inconsistent, with a switch between different health care providers under the influence of the popular and folk sectors. Despite beliefs in using different healthcare providers seeking complementary and alternative medicine, participants still experienced many physical health problems related to diabetes complications. Health professionals need to be aware of the risk of switches between different health care providers, and develop strategies to initiate health promotion interventions to include in the care actors of significance to the patient from the popular, folk and professional sectors, to maintain continuity of effective diabetes care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kampala, Uganda: African Field Epidemiology Network (A F E N E T) / Reseau Africain d'Epidemiologie de Terrain, 2015
Keywords
Complementary alternative medicine, diabetes mellitus, health-care seeking behaviour, traditional healers, nursing, Uganda
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-116349 (URN)10.11604/pamj.2015.20.76.5497 (DOI)26090034 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84925353285 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Available from: 2015-03-26 Created: 2015-03-26 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Aho, A. C., Hultsjö, S. & Hjelm, K. (2015). Young adults' experiences of living with recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy from a salutogenic orientation: an interview study.. Disability and Rehabilitation, 37(22), 2083-2091
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Young adults' experiences of living with recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy from a salutogenic orientation: an interview study.
2015 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 37, no 22, p. 2083-2091Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To describe young adults' experiences of living with recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2) from a salutogenic orientation. Methods: A qualitative explorative interview study, including 14 participants aged 20-30 years, was performed focusing on comprehensibility, manageability and meaningfulness in daily life. Content analysis was used for data analysis. Result: Living with LGMD2 not only implies learning to live with the disease and the variations between good and bad periods but also means trying to make sense of a progressive disease that brings uncertainty about future health, by striving to make the best of the situation. Disease progression involves practical and mental struggle, trying to maintain control over one's life despite vanished physical functions that require continual adjustments to the body. Restrictions in a double sense were described, not only due to the disease but also due to poor comprehension of the disease in society. Lack of knowledge about LGMD2 among professionals often results in having to fight for the support needed. Conclusion: In order to manage daily life, it is important to be seen and understood as an individual in contacts with professionals and in society in general, to have informal social support and meaningful activities as well as access to personal assistance if necessary. Implications for Rehabilitation Recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2) is a group of progressive disorders, which manifest in physical and psychological consequences for the individual. According to the salutogenic orientation, people need to find life comprehensible, manageable and meaningful, i.e. to achieve a sense of coherence (SOC), but living with LGMD2 may recurrently challenge the individual's SOC. Through the holistic view of the individual's situation that the salutogenic orientation provides, professionals may support the individual to strengthen SOC and thereby facilitate the movement towards health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2015
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-116354 (URN)10.3109/09638288.2014.998782 (DOI)000369748600007 ()25582030 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: This article is part of a dissertational work in caring science funded by Linnaeus University, Sweden.

Available from: 2015-03-26 Created: 2015-03-26 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Hultsjö, S. & Syren, S. (2013). Beliefs About Health, Health Risks and Health Expectations from the Perspective of People with a Psychotic Disorder. Open Nursing Journal, 7, 114-122
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beliefs About Health, Health Risks and Health Expectations from the Perspective of People with a Psychotic Disorder
2013 (English)In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 7, p. 114-122Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim:

To examine beliefs about health, health risks and health expectations from the perspective of people diagnosed with a psychotic disorder

Background:

People with psychotic disorders have a threefold higher risk of developing physical health problems than the general population, and prevention of these problems is warranted. Examining patients´ health beliefs could help deepen our understanding of how to plan successful health interventions with this group.

Methods:

Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted from November 2010 to October 2011 with 17 people with psychotic disorders. Data were analyzed using a qualitative content analysis.

Results:

An overall positive picture of health was found despite the fact that physical health was found to be hard to verbalize and understand. Health was mainly associated with psychological wellbeing, while health risks were found to be related to uncertain bodily identity, troublesome thoughts and inner voices, and exclusion from society. Interest in learning, and visions and goals of health seemed to increase awareness of health risks and health expectations, while not worrying could be viewed as a hindrance for health expectations.

Conclusion:

There is a lack of expressed awareness of physical health risks, but such awareness is fundamental to performing life-style changes [14]. Nurses thus have an important task to help patients understand and verbalize potential physical health risks, and to find out what motivates them to adopt health behaviors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sharjah, United Arab Emirates: Bentham Open, 2013
Keywords
Health beliefs, health expectations, health promotion, nursing, psychotic disorder, qualitative interviews.
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-162648 (URN)10.2174/1874434601307010114 (DOI)24039643 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84884184843 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-12-12 Created: 2019-12-12 Last updated: 2020-01-22Bibliographically approved
Hultsjö, S. & Brenner Blomqvist, K. (2013). Health behaviors as conceptualized by individuals diagnosed with a psychotic disorder. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 34(9), 665-672
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health behaviors as conceptualized by individuals diagnosed with a psychotic disorder
2013 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 34, no 9, p. 665-672Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study is to describe health behaviors as conceptualized by individuals diagnosed with a psychotic disorder. Data were collected by qualitative interviews (n = 20) and were analyzed using phenomenography. Mental well-being took priority over physical health and guided health behaviors. Social relations were significant, and when they proved insufficient, health care professionals were utilized as a substitute. Some relied on religion, complementary treatments, and folk beliefs for health. Interventions not dependent on mental well-being, and assisting individuals to participate in appropriate networks could have advantages. Interventions adapted to the individual's financial situation and cultural values are useful as issues related to these areas can obstruct implementation of health behaviors. Implementing the findings of this study in nursing research and education will prepare nurses to meet the varying health needs of different individuals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2013
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-162647 (URN)10.3109/01612840.2013.794178 (DOI)000209366700005 ()24004360 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84883681704 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-12-12 Created: 2019-12-12 Last updated: 2019-12-19Bibliographically approved
Hultsjö, S. (2013). Mental healthcare staff's knowledge and experiences of diabetes care for persons with psychosis: a qualitative interview study. Primary Health Care Research and Development, 14(3), 281-292
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mental healthcare staff's knowledge and experiences of diabetes care for persons with psychosis: a qualitative interview study
2013 (English)In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, ISSN 1463-4236, E-ISSN 1477-1128, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 281-292Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim

This paper aims to explore and analyse mental healthcare staff's (MHCS) knowledge and experiences of diabetes care for persons with psychosis.

Background

There are a range of studies concerning the increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus among persons with psychosis, and the need for healthy lifestyle interventions to prevent the illness. MHCS are often trusted and have regular follow-ups with the patients, and their attitudes and actions often play an important role for the person's care behaviour. There is still little documentation of their experiences of diabetes care.

Methods

A qualitative, explorative design was used, collecting data through semi-structured interviews with 12 MHCS working in psychosis outpatient care in Sweden. Data were analysed with qualitative content analysis.

Findings

Three categories emerged and provide a deeper understanding of how staff were aware of the risks of type 2 diabetes among their patients and therefore performed lifestyle interventions to promote these. Nevertheless, they lacked knowledge of diabetes care and simultaneously felt a lack of training among diabetes nurses to adapt diabetes care to suit persons with cognitive dysfunctions. Patients who were overconfident in their ability to manage diabetes care reported to have experienced most difficulties. Cooperation among those involved in these persons’ health was considered necessary.

Implications

Diabetes care for persons with psychosis could improve if knowledge of type 2 diabetes was increased among MHCS and training in how to adapt diabetes care to persons with cognitive dysfunctions was enlarged among diabetes nurses. A challenge for nurses is to see how the care of different illnesses and support given by the family and others affect the persons total life situation and health. Healthcare plans and cooperation among all those involved in these persons’ health is necessary for this.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2013
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-162642 (URN)10.1017/S1463423612000321 (DOI)000209619100008 ()22784379 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84894345625 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-12-12 Created: 2019-12-12 Last updated: 2019-12-19Bibliographically approved
Wärdig, R., Bachrach-Lindström, M., Foldemo, A., Lindström, T. & Hultsjö, S. (2013). Prerequisites for A Healthy Lifestyle: Experiences of Persons with Psychosis. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 34(8), 602-610
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prerequisites for A Healthy Lifestyle: Experiences of Persons with Psychosis
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2013 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 34, no 8, p. 602-610Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study is to explore prerequisites for a healthy lifestyle as described by individuals diagnosed with psychosis. Forty participants who had performed a lifestyle intervention focusing on physical activities and lifestyle education were interviewed. Conventional content analysis was used. The results are described in two categories: (1) Individual Prerequisites and (2) Being a Part of Society. The individuals said that they got stuck in a state of planning without taking action. It was pointless to make a bigger effort because the psychotic disorder could, at any time, worsen the prerequisites. They also said that they wanted to live like everybody else and therefore tried to adopt a normal lifestyle. Future interventions or professional support by mental health nurses and other health care givers should target the transition from planning to action to achieve a healthy lifestyle, and should help the individual to taking part in society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2013
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-162646 (URN)10.3109/01612840.2013.790525 (DOI)000209366600006 ()23909672 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84881402205 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-12-12 Created: 2019-12-12 Last updated: 2019-12-19Bibliographically approved
Bergqvist, A., Karlsson, M., Foldemo, A., Wärdig, R. & Hultsjö, S. (2013). Preventing the Development of Metabolic Syndrome in People with Psychotic Disorders—Difficult, but Possible: Experiences of Staff Working in Psychosis Outpatient Care in Sweden. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 34(5), 350-358
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preventing the Development of Metabolic Syndrome in People with Psychotic Disorders—Difficult, but Possible: Experiences of Staff Working in Psychosis Outpatient Care in Sweden
Show others...
2013 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 350-358Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to explore mental health staffs’ experiences of assisting people with psychotic disorders to implement lifestyle changes in an effort to prevent metabolic syndrome. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 12 health care professionals working in psychosis outpatient care in Sweden. Data were analysed using a qualitative content analysis. The results illustrate that implementation of lifestyle changes among people with psychotic disorders was experienced as difficult, but possible. The greatest obstacles experienced in this work were difficulties due to the reduction of cognitive functions associated with the disease. Guidelines available to staff in order to help them identify and prevent physical health problems in the group were not always followed and the content was not always relevant. Staff further described feelings of uncertainty about having to motivate people to take anti-psychotic medication while simultaneously being aware of the risks of metabolic deviations. Nursing interventions focusing on organising daily routines before conducting a more active prevention of metabolic syndrome, including information and practical support, were experienced as necessary. The importance of healthy eating and physical activity needs to be communicated in such a way that it is adjusted to the person's cognitive ability, and should be repeated over time, both verbally and in writing. Such efforts, in combination with empathic and seriously committed community-based social support, were experienced as having the best effect over time. Permanent lifestyle changes were experienced as having to be carried out on the patient's terms and in his or her home environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2013
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-162645 (URN)10.3109/01612840.2013.771234 (DOI)000209366200008 ()23663022 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84877728879 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-12-12 Created: 2019-12-12 Last updated: 2019-12-19Bibliographically approved
Hultsjö, S. & Hjelm, K. (2012). Community health-care staff's experiences of support to prevent type 2 diabetes among people with psychosis: An interview study with health staff. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 21(5), 480-490
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Community health-care staff's experiences of support to prevent type 2 diabetes among people with psychosis: An interview study with health staff
2012 (English)In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 480-490Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study was to describe mental health staff experiences of giving support to prevent type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) among people with psychosis in community psychiatry. A qualitative interview study with a purposeful sample of 12 community health staff was conducted. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The results show how staff reported continuously supporting people with psychosis to adapt to healthy lifestyles, but stated that support is not given until after a person becomes overweight or is diagnosed with type 2 DM. Support was described as a never‐ending process of motivation facing many reverses. Individually‐adapted support given in practical situations was perceived as most successful. Cooperation between health‐care organizations was seen as essential, but inadequate. Limitations in income and social network, and easy access to fast food and alcohol, were seen as obstacles to support. The results indicate that community health staff are in a position to make a considerable impact in motivating and supporting healthy lifestyle changes in practical situations in daily life among people with psychosis. This study raises awareness of how community health staff's support can be useful when developing nursing skills and health‐care plans for people with psychosis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2012
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-162644 (URN)10.1111/j.1447-0349.2012.00820.x (DOI)000308584100010 ()22616560 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84866147537 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-12-12 Created: 2019-12-12 Last updated: 2019-12-19Bibliographically approved
Hultsjö, S. & Hjelm, K. (2012). Organizing care for persons with psychotic disorders and risk of or existing diabetes mellitus type 2. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, 19(10), 891-902
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organizing care for persons with psychotic disorders and risk of or existing diabetes mellitus type 2
2012 (English)In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 19, no 10, p. 891-902Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This literature review aimed to explore previous knowledge about specific care requirements for persons with psychotic disorders and risk of or existing type 2 diabetes. Sixteen qualitative and quantitative studies in the area were identified and summarized. The studies together indicate that mental health nurses play an important role in motivating people to perform diabetes care as they are often known to and trusted by the patients. A holistic approach to the person's health, with close follow‐ups by psychiatric care and cooperation with diabetes care, may have benefits for the person with diabetes. Screening for and treating psychotic symptoms is an important task for the mental health nurse, as these symptoms drain energy from the person and prevent diabetes self‐care. Lifestyle and diabetes education needs to be practical, adapted to the individual and focused on maintaining a healthy diet, regular exercise, changing smoking habits and preventing diabetes complications. Treatment with antipsychotic drugs increases the need for follow‐ups of glycaemic control.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2012
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-162643 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2850.2012.01874.x (DOI)000310675100007 ()22314180 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84868518899 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-12-12 Created: 2019-12-12 Last updated: 2019-12-19Bibliographically approved
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