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Al Haji, Ghazwan
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Publications (6 of 6) Show all publications
Al Haji, G., Fowler, S. & Andersson Granberg, T. (2018). Smart traffic calming measures for smart cities - a pre-study. Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Smart traffic calming measures for smart cities - a pre-study
2018 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Traffic calming measures, such as speed bumps and elevated crossing points, are used to reduce speed, to prevent overtaking and generally contribute to a safer traffic situation. However, they might also cause increased response times for rescue vehicles (e.g. ambulances or fire trucks). An alternative to the conventional traffic calming measures is so-called smart traffic calming measures. These can determine when a vehicle approaches, whose journey should not be hindered, and adjust to allow for free passage for this vehicle.

This report gives an overview of the problem, and some examples of smart  traffic calming measures are discussed. Special focus is put on the wireless communication necessary to detect emergency vehicles. Furthermore, existing challenges and possible solutions for traffic calming measures and the communication needed to make them smart are discussed.

Abstract [sv]

Trafiklugnande åtgärder, såsom vägbulor och förhöjda övergångsställen, används för att minska hastigheten, hindra farliga omkörningar och generellt bidra till en säkrare trafiksituation. Dock kan de också bidra till att insatstiderna för räddningsfordon (t.ex. ambulanser eller räddningstjänstens släckbilar) förlängs. Ett alternativ till de konventionella trafiklugnande åtgärderna, är s.k. smarta trafiklugnade åtgärder. Dessa kan avgöra när ett fordon närmar sig, vars färd inte bör hindras, och anpassa sig så att fri färd för detta fordon tillåts.

I denna rapport ges en översikt av problemet, och några exempel på smarta trafiklugnade åtgärder diskuteras, med fokus på sådana som hämtar information och styrs med hjälp av trådlös kommunikation. Vidare diskuteras existerande utmaningar och möjliga lösningar för trafiklugnande åtgärder och den kommunikation som krävs för att göra dem smarta.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2018. p. 20
Series
CARER Report ; 22
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics Computer Engineering Infrastructure Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-145386 (URN)
Available from: 2018-02-27 Created: 2018-02-27 Last updated: 2018-02-27Bibliographically approved
al-Haji, G. (2014). Integrated system for monitoring road safety performance in cities. In: Pratelli, A (Ed.), Urban street design & planning: (pp. 105-114). WIT Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrated system for monitoring road safety performance in cities
2014 (English)In: Urban street design & planning / [ed] Pratelli, A, WIT Press, 2014, p. 105-114Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A strong monitoring system of road safety in a city is necessary to ensure that the strategies implemented will meet stated targets at city and national levels. Although road safety performance is a result of many key indicators, only a few of these indicators are generally considered in monitoring the performance of road safety in a city and in comparison to other cities. A number of monitoring systems are already being developed and used in road safety and they range from relatively simple models to highly complex ones depending on the number of indicators involved, details of data and complexity of methods used in calculations and analysis. In road safety, there are three main types of monitoring that are generally used, which are: Process Monitoring, Outcome Monitoring and Target Monitoring. The aim of this paper is to provide the importance and usefulness of having a fourth type of monitoring, so-called Integrated Monitoring, that links process, outcome and targets together. The paper also provides a conceptual overview, and illustrations that are used in the construction of the integrated monitoring system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WIT Press, 2014
Series
Transport Systems and Traffic Engineering, ISSN 2051-6827 ; 2
Keywords
traffic safety; monitoring system; performance indicators
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111628 (URN)000342067100011 ()978-1-84564-848-0 (ISBN)978-1-84564-847-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-11-12 Created: 2014-10-27 Last updated: 2014-11-18Bibliographically approved
al-Haji, G. (2011). Integrated system for monitoring road safety performance in cities. In: WIT Transactions on the Built Environment: vol 116. Paper presented at Urban Transport 2011 (pp. 475-484). , 116
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrated system for monitoring road safety performance in cities
2011 (English)In: WIT Transactions on the Built Environment: vol 116, 2011, Vol. 116, p. 475-484Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A strong monitoring system of road safety in a city is necessary to ensure that the strategies implemented will meet stated targets at city and national levels. Although road safety performance is a result of many key indicators, only a few of these indicators are generally considered in monitoring the performance of road safety in a city and in comparison to other cities. A number of monitoring systems are already being developed and used in road safety and they range from relatively simple models to highly complex ones depending on the number of indicators involved, details of data and complexity of methods used in calculations and analysis. In road safety, there are three main types of monitoring that are generally used, which are: Process Monitoring, Outcome Monitoring and Target Monitoring. The aim of this paper is to provide the importance and usefulness of having a fourth type of monitoring, so-called Integrated Monitoring, that links process, outcome and targets together. The paper also provides a conceptual overview, and illustrations that are used in the construction of the integrated monitoring system. © 2011 WIT Press.

Series
WIT Transactions on the Built Environment, ISSN 1743-3509
Keywords
Monitoring system; Performance indicators; Traffic safety
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-100718 (URN)10.2495/UT110401 (DOI)
Conference
Urban Transport 2011
Available from: 2013-11-12 Created: 2013-11-11 Last updated: 2013-11-12
Al-Haji, G. (2007). Road Safety Development Index: Theory, Philosophy and Practice. (Doctoral dissertation). Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Road Safety Development Index: Theory, Philosophy and Practice
2007 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This dissertation develops, presents and tests a new international tool, the so-called Road Safety Development Index (RSDI), which indicates in a comprehensive and easy way the severity of the road safety situation in a specific country and/or in comparison with other countries. There are three pillars of outcomes involved in the framework of RSDI. One pillar is the People focus (road user behaviour). The second is the System focus (safer vehicles, safer roads, enforcement, management, etc). The third is the Product focus in terms of accident death rates. This thesis analyses each of these pillars. In addition, RSDI links the key national practices of road safety to each other and to the end-results (accident death rates). The study suggests a master-list of performance indicators to be implemented for assessing road safety level in a country and for RSDI building. Based on the “master-list”, a short key list of performance indicators is chosen and classified into two primary categories that correspond to two groups of countries: LMCs “Less Motorised Countries” and HMCs “Highly Motorised Countries”. RSDI aggregates the key performance indicators into one single quantitative value (composite index). Four main objective and subjective approaches are used to calculate RSDI and determine which one is the best. One approach uses equal weights for all indicators and countries, whereas the other approaches give different weights depending on the importance of indicators. Two empirical studies were carried out, in different parts of the world, to determine the applicability of this tool in real world applications. The first empirical study comes from eight European countries (HMCs). The second empirical study comes from five Southeast Asian countries (LMCs). The RSDI results from this study indicate a remarkable difference between the selected countries even at the same level of motorisation and/or with close accident death rates. The unavailability of comparable and useful data are problems for deeper analysis of RSDI, especially the index should be as relevant as possible for different parts of the world. The empirical and theoretical assessments prove that RSDI can give a broader picture of the whole road safety situation in a country compared to the traditional models and can offer a simple and easily understandable tool to national policy makers and public.

Abstract [sv]

Denna avhandling utvecklar, presenterar och testar ett nytt internationellt verktyg, det så kallade Road Safety Development Index (RSDI), vilket på ett begripligt och lättillgängligt sätt beskriver trafiksäkerhetsläget i ett visst land jämfört med andra länder. Resultatet av RSDI utgörs av tre grundpelare. Den första pelaren är Fokus på människor (vägtrafikbeteende). Den andra är Fokus på systemet (säkrare fordon, säkrare vägar, beivrande, management, osv). Den tredje pelaren är Fokus på produkten med avseende på antal döda per fordon och per invånare. Arbetet analyserar var och en av dessa tre pelare. RSDI kopplar dessutom samman de viktigaste nationella praxisarna och erfarenheterna med varandra och till slutresultaten (antal dödsfall). Studien föreslår en lista med de viktigaste indikatorerna på hur olika länder vidtar åtgärder för trafiksäkerheten. Grundat på denna “master-lista” kan en kort lista med de viktigaste indikatorerna skapas och klassificeras i två huvudkategorier för två typer av länder: LMC “länder med låg andel fordon” och HMC “länder med hög andel fordon”. RSDI aggregerar de viktigaste performance-indikatorerna till ett enda kvantitativt mått (ett sammansatt index). Fyra olika objektiva och subjektiva huvudangreppssätt används för att beräkna RSDI och bestämma vilket av dem som är det bästa. En metod använder sig av lika stora vikter för alla indikatorer och länder, medan en annan metod ger olika vikter beroende på indikatorernas betydelse. Två empiriska studier genomfördes i olika delar av världen för att bestämma tillämpligheten av detta verktyg i verkliga situationer. Den första empiriska studien kommer från åtta länder i Europa (HMC-länder). Den andra empiriska studien har gjorts i fem länder i Sydostasien (LMC-länder). Resultaten från detta RSDI tyder på en anmärkningsvärd skillnad mellan de valda länderna, också om andelen bilägare och/eller andra variabler för trafiksäkerhet hålls konstanta. Bristen på jämförbara och användbara data medför problem vid en djupare analys av RSDI för olika delar av världen. De empiriska och teoretiska skattningarna visar att RSDI kan ge en bredare bild av hela trafiksäkerhetssituationen i ett land jämfört med traditionella modeller och kan erbjuda ett enkelt och lättförståeligt verktyg för de nationella beslutsfattarna liksom för allmänheten.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2007. p. 143
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Dissertations, ISSN 0345-7524 ; 1100
Keywords
Transport, Road Traffic, Sustainability, Road safety, European research cooperation, Civil engineering and architecture, Research on Europe, Public health science, Statistics
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-8812 (URN)978-91-85715-04-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2007-05-25, K2, Kåkenhus, Campus Norrköping, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2007-05-02 Created: 2007-05-02 Last updated: 2009-04-22Bibliographically approved
Lindskog, P. & al-Haji, G. (2005). Road safety in South-East Asia. Factors affecting motorcycle safety. In: ICTCT Extra Workshop,2005.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Road safety in South-East Asia. Factors affecting motorcycle safety
2005 (English)In: ICTCT Extra Workshop,2005, 2005Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-32361 (URN)18258 (Local ID)18258 (Archive number)18258 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09
Al Haji, G. (2005). Towards a Road Safety Development Index (RSDI): Development of an International Index to Measure Road Safety Performance. (Licentiate dissertation). Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards a Road Safety Development Index (RSDI): Development of an International Index to Measure Road Safety Performance
2005 (English)Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Aim. This study suggests a set of methodologies to combine different indicators of road safety into a single index. The RSDI is a simple and quick composite index, which may become a significant measurement in comparing, ranking and determining road safety levels in different countries and regions worldwide. Design. One particular concern in designing a Road Safety Development Index (RSDI) is to come up with a comprehensive set of exposure and risk indicators which includes as far as possible the main parameters in road safety related to human-vehicle-road and country patterns instead of considering few and isolated indicators such as accident rates. The RSDI gives a broad picture compared to the traditional models in road safety.

 Challenges. The differences in definitions, non-collection of data, no reliability of data and underreporting are problems for the construction of RSDI. In addition, the index should be as relevant as possible for different countries of the world, especially in developing countries.

Empirical study. This study empirically compares the road safety situation and trends between ten Southeast Asian countries and Sweden for the period 1994- 2003. Methodologies. Eleven indicators are chosen in RSDI, which have been categorised in nine dimensions. Four main approaches (objective and subjective) are used to calculate RSDI and determine which one is the best. One approach uses equal weights for all indicators and countries, whereas the other approaches give different weights depending on the importance of indicators.

Findings. The thesis examines the RSDI for the ten ASEAN countries and Sweden in 2003. The results from this study indicate a remarkable difference between ASEAN countries even at the same level of motorisation. Singapore and Brunei seem to have the best RSDI record among the ASEAN countries according to the indicators used, while Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam show lower RSDI records. Conclusions. The RSDI results seem very promising and worth testing further applications with bigger samples of countries and from different parts of the world.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2005. p. 113
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Thesis, ISSN 0280-7971 ; 1174
Keywords
Technology, Road safety, RSDI, ASEAN, international comparisons, Human Development, Index, ranking, principal components, composite indicators, macro-performance indicators, macro-models, TEKNIKVETENSKAP
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-2989 (URN)91-85299-70-7 (ISBN)
Presentation
(English)
Supervisors
Note
ISRN/Report code: LiU-Tek-Lic 2005:29Available from: 2005-07-19 Created: 2005-07-19 Last updated: 2009-02-12Bibliographically approved
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