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Zeiler, Kristin
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Publications (10 of 58) Show all publications
Murano, M. C., Slatman, J. & Zeiler, K. (2018). How sociophenomenology of the body problematises the ‘problem-oriented approach’ to growth hormone treatment. Medical Humanities
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How sociophenomenology of the body problematises the ‘problem-oriented approach’ to growth hormone treatment
2018 (English)In: Medical Humanities, ISSN 1468-215X, E-ISSN 1473-4265Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This article examines how people who are shorter than average make sense of their lived experience of embodiment. It offers a sociophenomenological analysis of 10 semistructured interviews conducted in the Netherlands, focusing on if, how, and why height matters to them. It draws theoretically on phenomenological discussions of lived and objective space, intercorporeality and norms about bodies. The analysis shows that height as a lived phenomenon (1) is active engagement in space, (2) coshapes habituated ways of behaving and (3) is shaped by gendered norms and beliefs about height. Based on this analysis, the article challenges what we label as the ‘problem-oriented approach’ to discussions about growth hormone treatment for children with idiopathic short stature. In this approach, possible psychosocial disadvantages or problems of short stature and quantifiable height become central to the ethical evaluation of growth hormone treatment at the expense of first-hand lived experiences of short stature and height as a lived phenomenon. Based on our sociophenomenological analysis, this paper argues that the rationale for giving growth hormone treatment should combine medical and psychological assessments with investigations of lived experiences of the child. Such an approach would allow considerations not only of possible risks or disadvantages of short stature but also of the actual ways in which the child makes sense of her or his height.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2018
National Category
Medical Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155773 (URN)10.1136/medhum-2018-011548 (DOI)30478090 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85057584066 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-26 Created: 2019-03-26 Last updated: 2019-04-01Bibliographically approved
Zeiler, K. (2018). On the Autós of Autonomous Decision Making: Intercorporeality, Temporality, and Enacted Normativities in Transplantation Medicine. In: Kevin Aho (Ed.), Existential Medicine: Essays on Health and Illness (pp. 81-100). London and New York: Rowman & Littlefield International
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the Autós of Autonomous Decision Making: Intercorporeality, Temporality, and Enacted Normativities in Transplantation Medicine
2018 (English)In: Existential Medicine: Essays on Health and Illness / [ed] Kevin Aho, London and New York: Rowman & Littlefield International, 2018, p. 81-100Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter brings phenomenological philosophy to bioethics debates about decision-making in transplantation medicine in general and parental live kidney donation in specific. It clarifies why both discussions of parental live kidney donation in terms of coercion (Kärrfelt et al 2004) and as “indicative” of parents’ autonomy (if it expresses what they want or who they want to be, see Crouch and Elliot 1999) fail to make sense of the complexity of the situation. Noting that the rich literature that explores relational aspects of subjectivity and conceptualises autonomous individuals as making decisions situated within and dependent on particular social contexts (see Freeman 2011; Donchin 2001; Mackenzie and Stoljars 2000; Christman 1998; Friedman 1997) still rarely addresses the role of the body, the chapter also addresses the role of embodiment for perception and choice. It argues for the need to think-through what may be labelled as the autós of autonomy and, more precisely, the focus on one’s own, the same/sameness, oneself or one’s self that has come to characterise much autonomy discussions, via phenomenological philosophy.

The chapter is divided into three parts. First, I make use of the phenomenological understanding of the intercorporeal self as being-in-the-world, in a discussion of how pain, fear or bodily symptoms of ESRD that unfolds in the shared space of child and parent can shape both of them in relation to each other (c.f. Käll 2013; Zeiler 2014a), feed into their bodily style of being-together, and help form parents’ perception of actions ‘within’ reach for them. Second, I shift the focus from the parent–child dyad to the larger semiotic–material context of haemodialysis and kidney transplantation in Sweden. This allows for an examination of embodied and enacted normativities, through an engagement with what Martin Gunnarson (2016: 128) has identified as a ‘dominant […] orientation towards transplantation’ in Sweden and Latvia. This second part also combines the discussion of an orientation towards transplantation with that of how norms about parenthood may be incorporated and excorporated into parents’ lived bodies,4 thereby making it possible to show why the no-choice theme in previous empirical work is understandable but more disconcerting than may first be assumed. Third, I argue that the acknowledgement of intercorporeal dimensions of bodily existence (argued for in Part I) and the role of orientation (argued for in Part II) demonstrates the need for a thinking-through of the autós of autonomous decision making, i.e. the understanding of the ‘ownness’ of this decision making, in ways other than those argued for in much of the bioethical autonomy and relational autonomy literature.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London and New York: Rowman & Littlefield International, 2018
Series
New Heidegger Research
Keywords
Merleau-Ponty; embodiment; relationality; transplantation medicine; intercorporeality; autonomy; parenthood; kidney donation
National Category
Philosophy Medical Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150908 (URN)9781786604835 (ISBN)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2018-09-04 Created: 2018-09-04 Last updated: 2018-09-05Bibliographically approved
Zeiler, K. (2018). Teenage Girlhood and Bodily Agency: On Power, Weight, Dys-Appearance and Eu-Appearance in a Norwegian Lifestyle Programme. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology, 8(1), 1-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teenage Girlhood and Bodily Agency: On Power, Weight, Dys-Appearance and Eu-Appearance in a Norwegian Lifestyle Programme
2018 (English)In: Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology, ISSN 2079-7222, E-ISSN 1445-7377, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite the growing literature on childhood obesity and lifestyle intervention programmes focusing on weight loss, few studies have examined young persons’ experiences of being identified as candidates for such programmes and of participating in them. This paper does so. Juxtaposing insights from phenomenology with an approach inspired by Foucault, the paper shows how teenage girls’ bodily self-perception and bodily self-awareness are shaped in intercorporeal assemblages comprising other people and specific features or elements of the lifestyle programme.

Inspired by van Manen’s hermeneutic-phenomenological approach, with its point of departure in lived experience, this paper draws on interviews with Norwegian teenage girls participating in the same lifestyle programme and identifies three core thematic aspects of the girls’ experiences: being identified as a candidate for a lifestyle programme and not wanting this; negotiating the lack of weight loss and the scales; and bodily situated agency – feeling good and being able. Permeating all three themes are two central, interrelated phenomena: agency and resistance. Furthermore, the paper shows how a combination of Foucauldian insights and a phenomenological understanding of intercorporeality can help to shed light on the power, affective, material and temporal dimensions of dys-appearance (i.e., when one’s body appears as bad or wrong), as well as those of eu-appearance (i.e., when one’s body appears as healthy or strong), and thus contribute to the understanding of the girls’ narrated lived experiences.

On the basis of these findings, we argue that weight-related treatment goals are not necessarily compatible with the strengthening of adolescents’ body images and self-esteem. However, whilst being obliged to attend to their bodies while in the programme, the girls also encountered unexpected, positive bodily feelings and experiences. Such events, we suggest, offer a means of resisting the more troubling dys-appearing bodily situations our participants described so powerfully.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NISC - National Inquiry Services Centre, 2018
Keywords
embodiment; bodily self-awareness; weight; agency; phenomenology; intercorporeality; Foucault
National Category
Philosophy Other Humanities not elsewhere specified Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150888 (URN)10.1080/20797222.2018.1450202 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-09-03 Created: 2018-09-03 Last updated: 2018-09-25Bibliographically approved
Malmqvist, E. & Zeiler, K. (Eds.). (2016). Bodily Exchanges, Bioethics and Border Crossing: Perspectives on Giving, Selling and Sharing Bodies (1ed.). London and New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bodily Exchanges, Bioethics and Border Crossing: Perspectives on Giving, Selling and Sharing Bodies
2016 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Medical therapy, research and technology enable us to make our bodies, or parts of them, available to others in an increasing number of ways. This is the case in organ, tissue, egg and sperm donation as well as in surrogate motherhood and clinical research. Bringing together leading scholars working on the ethical, social and cultural aspects of such bodily exchanges, this cutting-edge book develops new ways of understanding them.

Bodily Exchanges, Bioethics and Border Crossing both probes the established giving and selling frameworks for conceptualising bodily exchanges in medicine, and seeks to develop and examine another, less familiar framework: that of sharing. A framework of sharing can capture practices that involve giving up and giving away part of one’s body, such as organ and tissue donation, and practices that do not, such as surrogacy and research participation. Sharing also recognizes the multiple relationalities that these exchanges can involve and invites inquiry into the context in which they occur. In addition, the book explores the multiple forms of border crossing that bodily exchanges in medicine involve, from the physical boundaries of the body to relational borders – as can happen in surrogacy – to national borders and the range of ethical issues that these various border-crossings can give rise to. 

Engaging with anthropology, sociology, philosophy, and feminist and postcolonical perspectives, this is an original and timely contribution to contemporary bioethics in a time of increasing globalization. It will be of use to students and researchers from a range of humanities and social science backgrounds as well as medical and other healthcare professionals with an interest in bioethics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London and New York: Routledge, 2016. p. 212 Edition: 1
Series
Routledge Studies in the Sociology of Health and Illness
Keywords
Transplantation, Assisted reproductive techniques, Ethics, Organdonationer, Organhandel, Transplantation, Etik och moral
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Medical Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127095 (URN)9781138858763 (ISBN)
Funder
Linköpings universitetRiksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2016-04-13 Created: 2016-04-13 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Malmqvist, E. & Zeiler, K. (2016). Concluding reflections: Bodily exchanges as sharing. In: Erik Malmqvist, Kristin Zeiler (Ed.), Bodily Exchanges, Bioethics and Border Crossing: Perspectives on Giving, Selling and Sharing Bodies (pp. 197-207). London and New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Concluding reflections: Bodily exchanges as sharing
2016 (English)In: Bodily Exchanges, Bioethics and Border Crossing: Perspectives on Giving, Selling and Sharing Bodies / [ed] Erik Malmqvist, Kristin Zeiler, London and New York: Routledge, 2016, p. 197-207Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London and New York: Routledge, 2016
National Category
Philosophy Medical Ethics Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123631 (URN)978-11-3885-876-3 (ISBN)
Funder
Linköpings universitetRiksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2016-01-02 Created: 2016-01-02 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Munthe, C., Broström, L., Brülde, B., Cutas, D., Eriksson, S., Helgeson, G., . . . Johansson, M. (2016). Efter skandalen: ”Gråzoner sätt att blanda bort korten”. Svenska Dagbladet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Efter skandalen: ”Gråzoner sätt att blanda bort korten”
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2016 (Swedish)In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal, News item (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [sv]

Efter skandalen kring kirurgen på Karolinska Institutet som gjorde experimentella operationer, talas det om gråzoner i lagen. Men detta stämmer inte, utan är ett sätt att blanda bort korten, skriver en rad professorer från sex olika universitet gemensamt.

Keywords
research ethics, grey zone, macciarini, forskningsetik, gråzon, macchiarini
National Category
Ethics Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127132 (URN)
Available from: 2016-04-14 Created: 2016-04-14 Last updated: 2019-06-27
Zbikowski, A., Zeiler, K. & Swahnberg, K. (2016). Forum Play as a method for learning ethical practice: A qualitative study among Swedish health-care staff. Clinical Ethics, 11(1), 9-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Forum Play as a method for learning ethical practice: A qualitative study among Swedish health-care staff
2016 (English)In: Clinical Ethics, ISSN 1477-7509, E-ISSN 1758-101X, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 9-18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: In Scandinavia 13–28% of gynecology patients have experienced abuse in health care in their life time, which contradicts the ethical obligations not to harm the patient and to protect the patient's dignity. Concerning learning to act ethically, scholars have emphasized the importance of combining theoretical and practical dimensions. This article explores Forum Play as a way of learning to act ethically in abusive situations in health care.

Method: Ten health-care workers participating in a Forum Play course took part in this study. To explore participants' experiences of Forum Play, semi-structured interviews were conducted and processed by using the grounded theory analysis techniques of coding and constant comparison.

Results: The analysis resulted in the core category “developing response–ability.” It encompasses the processes bringing about the ability to respond adequately to situations where abuse occurs and the conditions for these processes, as well as the participants' achieved understanding of the third person's potential to act in a situation with a power imbalance. Forum Play allows participants to reflect on both verbal and body language, and gives them time to enact and think through issues of moral agency.

Conclusion: The simulated reality of Forum Play offers a platform where learning to act ethically in abusive situations in health care is facilitated by providing a safe space, suspending constricting structural conditions such as hierarchies and lack of time, fostering moral imagination, allowing creativity in developing and trying out a variety of acting alternatives, and reflecting upon the observed and experienced situation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2016
Keywords
Abuse in health care, professional-patient relation, health care, power, Forum Theater, Forum Play, constant comparative method, ethical learning
National Category
Medical Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-106233 (URN)10.1177/1477750915622032 (DOI)
Note

At the time for thesis presentation publication was in status: Manuscript

At the time for thesis presentation manuscript was named: Forum Play as a Method for Ethical Learning: A Qualitative Study among Swedish Health Care Staff

Available from: 2014-04-29 Created: 2014-04-29 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Malmqvist, E. & Zeiler, K. (2016). Introduction. In: Erik Malmqvist, Kristin Zeiler (Ed.), Bodily Exchanges, Bioethics and Border Crossing: Perspectives on Giving, Selling and Sharing Bodies (pp. 1-18). London and New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction
2016 (English)In: Bodily Exchanges, Bioethics and Border Crossing: Perspectives on Giving, Selling and Sharing Bodies / [ed] Erik Malmqvist, Kristin Zeiler, London and New York: Routledge, 2016, p. 1-18Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London and New York: Routledge, 2016
National Category
Philosophy Medical Ethics Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123630 (URN)978-11-3885-876-3 (ISBN)
Funder
Linköpings universitetRiksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2016-01-02 Created: 2016-01-02 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Zeiler, K. (2016). Relational ontology and ethics in online organ solicitation: the problem of sharing one's body when being touched online. In: Erik Malmqvist and Kristin Zeiler (Ed.), Bodily exchanges, bioethics and border crossing: Perspectives on Giving, Selling and Sharing Bodies (pp. 119-134). Abingdon: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relational ontology and ethics in online organ solicitation: the problem of sharing one's body when being touched online
2016 (English)In: Bodily exchanges, bioethics and border crossing: Perspectives on Giving, Selling and Sharing Bodies / [ed] Erik Malmqvist and Kristin Zeiler, Abingdon: Routledge, 2016, p. 119-134Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2016
National Category
Social and Clinical Pharmacy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123954 (URN)9781138858763 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-01-15 Created: 2016-01-15 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Guntram, L. & Zeiler, K. (2016). ‘You have all those emotions inside that you cannot show because of what they will cause’: Disclosing the absence of one’s uterus and vagina. Social Science and Medicine, 167, 63-70
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘You have all those emotions inside that you cannot show because of what they will cause’: Disclosing the absence of one’s uterus and vagina
2016 (English)In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 167, p. 63-70Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article examines young women's experiences of telling others that they have no uterus and no, or a so-called small, vagina – a condition labelled ‘congenital absence of uterus and vagina’, which falls within the larger category of ‘atypical’ sex development. Our aim is to investigate how affective dissonances such as fear and frustration are expressed in young women's narratives about letting others know about their ‘atypical’ sex development, and how these women narrate desired steps to recognition. By drawing on feminist writings on the performativity of affects or emotions, we examine what affective dissonances accomplish within three identified narratives: how affective dissonances may contribute to the women's positioning of themselves vis-à-vis other individuals and how affective dissonances can imply a strengthening and/or questioning of norms about female embodiment and heterosexuality. This allows us to tease out how routes for questioning of these norms become available through the three narratives that together form a storyline of coming out about a congenital absence of a uterus and vagina in the Swedish context. Furthermore, by demonstrating how others' responses shape the women – their understandings of their own bodies, their envisaged future disclosures and their relations – our analysis highlights the multifaceted intersubjective and in other ways relational, affective and temporal dimensions of coming out about one's 'atypical' sex development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Emotions, intersex, Disorder of sex development (DSD), vagina, uterus, coming out, Sweden, Affective dissonance
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111097 (URN)10.1016/j.socscimed.2016.08.028 (DOI)000384871300008 ()27598551 (PubMedID)
Note

At the time for thesis presentation publication was in status: Manuscript

Funding agencies: Pro Futura Scientia Fellowship; Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study; Uppsala University; Riksbankens Jubileumsfond; Department of Thematic Studies, Linkoping University

Available from: 2014-10-07 Created: 2014-10-07 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
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