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Svärd, J., Schönborn, K. & Hallström, J. (2017). Does Authentic Learning Work?: Evaluating an Innovation Project in Upper Secondary Technology Education in Sweden. In: PATT 34, Technology & Engineering Education: Fostering the Creativity of Youth Around the Globe: . Paper presented at PATT, Pupils' Attitudes Towards Technology, Philadelphia, 10-14 July, 2017 (pp. 1-12). Millersville, PA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does Authentic Learning Work?: Evaluating an Innovation Project in Upper Secondary Technology Education in Sweden
2017 (English)In: PATT 34, Technology & Engineering Education: Fostering the Creativity of Youth Around the Globe, Millersville, PA, 2017, 1-12 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Creativity is widely viewed as a key component of human development. Creativity is part of the “21st century skills” movement as well as a cornerstone of the technology subject in the Swedish school system. Could authentic learning, as described by Herrington, Reeves and Oliver, be one way to promote creativity? In a pilot study conducted in 2016, 13 groups of upper secondary students participated in a five-week authentic innovation project where they cooperated in the design of solutions for real-world problems. This approach mirrors Brown, Collins and Duguid’s statement that in order to learn a subject, students need more than abilities that focus on acquiring abstract concepts; they need to use and apply conceptual tools while performing authentic activities. The outcome of the innovation project was displayed and presented at an exhibition where professional inventors provided feedback on students’ created solutions. This paper presents results from the pilot study as well as preliminary findings from a main study, involving 25 groups, currently underway. Data from the pilot study was collected through questionnaires after each lesson, following the five-week module, and at the end of the entire course, as well as through semi-structured interviews with nine students. The results from the pilot study indicate that the students perceived the project as being authentic, and departed the course with an increased sense of comprehension and understanding. Future studies will explore learning activity within groups, and differences between students’ and teachers’ understanding of authenticity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Millersville, PA: , 2017
Keyword
Technology education, Upper secondary school, Authentic learning, Innovation
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-139789 (URN)
Conference
PATT, Pupils' Attitudes Towards Technology, Philadelphia, 10-14 July, 2017
Available from: 2017-08-16 Created: 2017-08-16 Last updated: 2017-08-17Bibliographically approved
Hallström, J. & Klasander, C. (2017). Visible Parts, Invisible Whole: Swedish Technology Student Teachers’ Conceptions about Technological Systems. International journal of technology and design education (3), 387-405.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Visible Parts, Invisible Whole: Swedish Technology Student Teachers’ Conceptions about Technological Systems
2017 (English)In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804, no 3, 387-405 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Technological systems are included as a component of national technology curricula and standards for primary and secondary education as well as corresponding teacher education around the world. Little is known, however, of how pupils, students, and teachers conceive of technological systems. In this article we report on a study investigating Swedish technology student teachers’ conceptions of technological systems. The following research question is posed: How do Swedish technology student teachers conceive of technological systems? Data was collected through in-depth qualitative surveys with 26 Swedish technology student teachers. The data was analysed using a hermeneutic method, aided by a theoretical synthesis of established system theories (system significants). The main results of the study are that the technology student teachers expressed diverse conceptions of technological systems, but that on average almost half of them provided answers that were considered as undefined. The parts of the systems that the students understood were mostly the visible parts, either components, devices, or products such as buttons, power lines, hydroelectric plants, or the interface with the software inside a mobile phone. However, the ‘invisible’ or abstract aspects of the technological systems, such as flows of information, energy or matter, or control operations were difficult to understand for the majority of the students. The flow of information was particularly challenging in this regard. The students could identify the input and often the output of the systems, that is, what systems or components do, but the processes that take place within the systems were elusive. Comparing between technological systems also proved difficult for many students. The role of humans was considered important but it was mostly humans as users not as actors on a more systemic level, for example, as system owners, innovators, or politicians. This study confirms previous research in that the students had a basic understanding of structure, input and output of a technological system. Thus, the adult students in this study did not seem to have better understanding of technological systems than school pupils and teachers in previous studies, although this is in line with previous investigations on the general system thinking capabilities of children and adults. The most important implication of this study is that students need to be trained in systems thinking, particularly regarding how components work and connect to each other, flows (especially of information), system dependency, and the human role in technological systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dordrecht: Springer, 2017
Keyword
Technological systems, Conceptions, Technology teacher education, Systems theory, Sweden
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124395 (URN)10.1007/s10798-016-9356-1 (DOI)000408371500002 ()
Available from: 2016-01-28 Created: 2016-01-28 Last updated: 2017-09-12
Samuelsson, J. & Hallström, J. (2016). Matematiksvårigheter i åtgärdsprogram: skolornas intentioner med elever i behov av särskilt stöd (1ed.). In: Anna-Lena Eriksson-Gustavsson, Karin Forslund Frykedal, Marcus Samuelsson (Ed.), Specialpedagogik: i, om, för och med praktiken (pp. 51-71). Stockholm: Liber.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Matematiksvårigheter i åtgärdsprogram: skolornas intentioner med elever i behov av särskilt stöd
2016 (Swedish)In: Specialpedagogik: i, om, för och med praktiken / [ed] Anna-Lena Eriksson-Gustavsson, Karin Forslund Frykedal, Marcus Samuelsson, Stockholm: Liber, 2016, 1, 51-71 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Liber, 2016 Edition: 1
Keyword
Matematikundervisning, Specialundervisning
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125751 (URN)9789147111947 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-03-03 Created: 2016-03-03 Last updated: 2017-02-02Bibliographically approved
Nordlöf, C., Höst, G. E., Klasander, C. & Hallström, J. (2015). An explorative study of the Swedish Technology subject from the teacher’s perspective. In: Marjolaine Chatoney (Ed.), PATT 29 Plurality and Complementarity of Approaches in Design & Technology Education, Marseille, France, April 2015: . Paper presented at PATT 29. Marseille: Presses Universitaires de Provence.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An explorative study of the Swedish Technology subject from the teacher’s perspective
2015 (English)In: PATT 29 Plurality and Complementarity of Approaches in Design & Technology Education, Marseille, France, April 2015 / [ed] Marjolaine Chatoney, Marseille: Presses Universitaires de Provence , 2015Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this study Swedish teachers’ views of the technology subject and technology teaching are examined. Investigations made the last few years show that there are deficiencies in the technology teaching in Swedish schools - e.g. lack of time in the timetable, low status, non-certified teachers and lack of materials. The subject is young, compared to other subjects, and the teachers have different backgrounds and different technological knowledge. Educational research in general tells us that the teacher has a great impact on the pupils and their learning situation. Therefore, the aim is to examine how Swedish Technology teachers experience and view the subject and its teaching.

The study is quantitative and based on a web based inquiry. 1153 teachers participated. The participants teach, or taught, technology in Swedish compulsory schools.  The data was analysed with the Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) software. In order to examine the teacher’s experience consisting of different underlying factors, an exploratory factor analysis was performed on 18 statements from the inquiry. The result of the analysis shows that there are four underlying factors; 1 Technology education is important, 2 Good conditions for technology education, 3 Syllabus is in focus for technology education and 4 Confidence, interest and technology education of the teacher. “Technology education is important” has the highest mean, which indicates that most of the teachers do find Technology important. The lowest mean is found in “Good conditions for technology education”, it shows that the respondents were not satisfied with the circumstances in their school. The factors are a help for a wider understanding of the teachers experience. Further investigations of the factors and the statistical material will follow, with ambitions to find out if there are some preconditions that explain why teachers have different views of the factors found in this first part.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Marseille: Presses Universitaires de Provence, 2015
Keyword
Technology education, technology teachers, teachers’ attitude, factor analysis
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117514 (URN)
Conference
PATT 29
Available from: 2015-04-30 Created: 2015-04-30 Last updated: 2015-11-09
Hallström, J. (2015). Drawing the Boundary Lines of Science Education: Subject Associations and Swedish Pre-Service Biology Teacher Education 1960-1990. History of Education Review, 44(2).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Drawing the Boundary Lines of Science Education: Subject Associations and Swedish Pre-Service Biology Teacher Education 1960-1990
2015 (English)In: History of Education Review, ISSN 0819-8691, Vol. 44, no 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The aim of this article is to describe and analyse how the Swedish Association of Biology Teachers (ABT) and some other subject associations helped form pre-service biology teacher education in two major Swedish reforms from ca. 1960 to 1990.

Design/methodology/approach

The activities of subject associations can be understood as boundary-work since they defend their subject boundaries in terms of content, space in the timetable, and legitimacy. A hermeneutic method of text interpretation is employed in analysing historical archival and parliamentary material.

Findings

The work of the ABT to demarcate their subject in the 1968 and 1988 Teacher Education Reforms may seem like merely defending certain biological items instead of others, in the name of science. However, it was also a professional struggle to assert the importance of the teachers, their jobs, education, knowledge of biology subject matter, and thereby their professional authority and autonomy. The ABT were also caught in a political struggle for their subject throughout the period of investigation. Depending on the political winds of the time they therefore had to ally themselves with or distance themselves from various actors.

Originality/value

In comparison with the few other studies of subject associations, this article is unique in outlining how the ABT acted in relation to teacher education. However, the ways of doing boundary-work were still very similar to those used by subject associations in schools in other countries, especially in acting for increased study time in their respective science subjects as well as their resistance to subject integration. An obvious conclusion regarding teacher education is that subject associations such as the ABT did not contribute to bridging the gap between subject matter and pedagogy but rather the opposite. Biology teacher education was seen as an academic pursuit carried out at universities rather than at the practically oriented teacher training colleges.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2015
National Category
History Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120708 (URN)10.1108/HER-02-2014-0008 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-08-24 Created: 2015-08-24 Last updated: 2015-09-17
Hallström, J., Elvstrand, H. & Hellberg, K. (2015). Gender and technology in free play in Swedish early childhood education. International journal of technology and design education, 25(2), 137-149.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender and technology in free play in Swedish early childhood education
2015 (English)In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804, Vol. 25, no 2, 137-149 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the new Swedish curriculum for the preschool (2010) technology education is emphasized as one of the most significant pedagogical areas to work with. The aim of this article is to investigate how girls and boys explore and learn technology as well as how their teachers frame this in free play in two Swedish preschools. The study is inspired by an ethnographic approach and is based on qualitative data collected through video-taped observations and informal talk with children and teachers in two preschools. It is concluded that girls and boys learn to approach and handle technology differently, thereby confirming rather than dissolving gender boundaries. The girls more often have a special purpose in building something they need in their play, that is, they mostly engage in technological construction as a sideline. The boys, on the other hand, more often award technological construction a central part in their play; building is an end in itself. Teachers are not so active in supporting free play involving technology among the older children, nor in giving boys and girls equal opportunities to explore and use material and toys which are not gender-stereotyped. One important implication is that in-service education needs to address not only experiments and construction but also gender issues and how teachers can create equal opportunities for boys and girls in the free play.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2015
Keyword
Preschool Technology education Free play Gender Sweden
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117417 (URN)10.1007/s10798-014-9274-z (DOI)000353406600001 ()
Available from: 2015-04-27 Created: 2015-04-27 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Svenningsson, J., Hultén, M. & Hallström, J. (2015). Swedish Students’ view on Technology: Results from a pilot study using an adaptation of the PATT-SQ questionnaire. In: Marjolaine Chatoney (Ed.), PATT 29 Plurality and Complementarity of Approaches in Design & Technology Education, Marseille, France, April 2015: . Paper presented at PATT 29. Marseille: Presses Universitaires de Provence.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish Students’ view on Technology: Results from a pilot study using an adaptation of the PATT-SQ questionnaire
2015 (English)In: PATT 29 Plurality and Complementarity of Approaches in Design & Technology Education, Marseille, France, April 2015 / [ed] Marjolaine Chatoney, Marseille: Presses Universitaires de Provence , 2015Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Marseille: Presses Universitaires de Provence, 2015
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117516 (URN)
Conference
PATT 29
Available from: 2015-04-30 Created: 2015-04-30 Last updated: 2016-05-04
Schooner, P., Klasander, C. & Hallström, J. (2015). Swedish Teachers’ Views of Assessing Technological Systems in Compulsory School. In: Marjolaine Chatoney (Ed.), PATT 29 Plurality and Complementarity of Approaches in Design & Technology Education, Marseille, France, April 2015: . Paper presented at PATT 29. Marseille: Presses Universitaires de Provence.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish Teachers’ Views of Assessing Technological Systems in Compulsory School
2015 (English)In: PATT 29 Plurality and Complementarity of Approaches in Design & Technology Education, Marseille, France, April 2015 / [ed] Marjolaine Chatoney, Marseille: Presses Universitaires de Provence , 2015Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Technology education is regarded as a new school subject in comparison with other subjects within the compulsory school system – both nationally and internationally. As such, the practice of teaching and assessment in technology lacks the long-term experiences that other teachers within other subjects can use in their own practices. This becomes especially apparent when technology teachers assess students’ knowledge in and about technological systems. Studies have shown that technology teachers lack experience of and support for assessment. Consequently, technology teachers’ (implicit) experiences constitute a crucial factor in the making of the course design and shaping students paths to knowledge about technological systems.

This paper describes the assessment views of five technology teachers and their elaborated thoughts on valuing systems knowledge for students aged 13 to 16 in the Swedish compulsory school through the use of semi-structured qualitative interviews. The research aim is to describe the teachers’ assessment views in terms of types of knowledge, spanning from basic to higher understanding of technological systems. Six focused areas of interest when the teachers assess knowledge about systems are presented. The teachers experienced three levels of understanding - basic, intermediate and advanced. In conclusion, the gap between basic and higher levels of understanding can be defined as a linear, uni-dimensional understanding of systems on a basic level, but a non-linear, multi-dimensional understanding on both an intermediate and advanced level.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Marseille: Presses Universitaires de Provence, 2015
Keyword
technological systems, assessment, teachers’ views, compulsory school
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117515 (URN)
Conference
PATT 29
Available from: 2015-04-30 Created: 2015-04-30 Last updated: 2015-05-07
Axell, C. & Hallström, J. (2015). Technology and the shaping of a Swedish national identity in the educational work of Selma Lagerlöf, 1900-1907. History of Education and Children's Literature, 10(1), 299-316.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Technology and the shaping of a Swedish national identity in the educational work of Selma Lagerlöf, 1900-1907
2015 (English)In: History of Education and Children's Literature, ISSN 1971-1093, E-ISSN 1971-1131, Vol. 10, no 1, 299-316 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the early 1900s Sweden saw an unprecedented societal transformation through ongoing industrialisation, urbanisation, democratisation and new technologies. In 1906-1907 the celebrated Swedish writer Selma Lagerlöf published a book subsequently read by thousands of elementary school children, The Wonderful Adventures of Nils. Although Lagerlöf’s book was mainly seen as a novel, she was commissioned to write it as a textbook in geography for the Swedish elementary school. One of the aims on the part of the commissioner – the Swedish Association of Elementary School Teachers – was for the book to induce Swedish nationalist sentiment and boost the feeling of a national identity in schoolchildren. The aim of this study is to describe and analyse how various representations of technology were utilised to create the sense of a Swedish national identity in The Wonderful Adventures of Nils. A hermeneutic method is employed to analyse the book in relation to the historical context of early 20th century Sweden. It is concluded that technology and human settlements are natural elements of the various landscapes of Sweden, thereby making them as much a part of building a national identity around the physical environment as woods, plains, lakes, animals and plants. The message of the book seems to be that technology is interwoven with society and nature in the formation of modern Sweden. It is impossible to describe the nation and impart nationalism in children without also incorporating technology; it is a human creation and as much a force in shaping the nation as other human endeavours and nature.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Macerata: Università di Macerata, Italy, 2015
Keyword
Children’s Books; History of Education; Nationalization; Science and Technology; Selma Lagerlöf, Sweden; XX Century
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-119696 (URN)000370984900020 ()
Available from: 2015-06-24 Created: 2015-06-24 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Hallström, J., Klasander, C. & Svensson, M. (2015). The Black Box and Beyond: Introducing a Conceptual Model as a Learning Tool for Developing Knowledge about Technological Systems. In: Marjolaine Chatoney (Ed.), PATT 29 Plurality and Complementarity of Approaches in Design & Technology Education, Marseille, France, April 2015: . Paper presented at PATT 29. Marseille: Presses Universitaires de Provence.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Black Box and Beyond: Introducing a Conceptual Model as a Learning Tool for Developing Knowledge about Technological Systems
2015 (English)In: PATT 29 Plurality and Complementarity of Approaches in Design & Technology Education, Marseille, France, April 2015 / [ed] Marjolaine Chatoney, Marseille: Presses Universitaires de Provence , 2015Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the last decade research about technological systems in technology education has attracted increased attention. This research has pinpointed pedagogical challenges in teaching about systems, particularly how pupils are given the opportunity to learn about complex systems in a conscious progression; the components and connections in between, system boundaries, and the relation to society in general and other systems in particular. The aim of this paper is to construct a conceptual model as a learning tool for developing knowledge about technological systems. Since we base this model on previous research about technological systems, this study is a qualitative research synthesis, where we employ comparative and hermeneutic methods. Our model contains focal points for teachers and pupils to attend to in technological systems education: 1. System structure, 2. System function with single or multiple inputs, and 3.The relationship between components without and with feedback loops. Important concepts for education about technological systems are system boundary, function, flow, feedback loop, black box, consequence, and historical evolution. Finally we introduce the concept of systems horizon as the limit for what can fruitfully be analyzed as a technological system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Marseille: Presses Universitaires de Provence, 2015
Keyword
technological system, conceptual model, technology education
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117513 (URN)
Conference
PATT 29
Available from: 2015-04-30 Created: 2015-04-30 Last updated: 2015-05-06
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0829-3349

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