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Henning, Dag
Publications (10 of 17) Show all publications
Amiri, S., Henning, D. & Karlsson, B. (2013). Simulation and introduction of a CHP plant in a Swedish biogas system. Renewable energy, 49(SI), 242-249
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Simulation and introduction of a CHP plant in a Swedish biogas system
2013 (English)In: Renewable energy, ISSN 0960-1481, E-ISSN 1879-0682, Vol. 49, no SI, p. 242-249Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objectives of this study are to present a model for biogas production systems to help achieve a more cost-effective system, and to analyse the conditions for connecting combined heat and power (CHP) plants to the biogas system. The European electricity market is assumed to be fully deregulated. The relation between connection of CHP. increased electricity and heat production, electricity prices, and electricity certificate trading is investigated. A cost-minimising linear programming model (MODEST) is used. MODEST has been applied to many energy systems, but this is the first time the model has been used for biogas production. The new model, which is the main result of this work, can be used for operational optimisation and evaluating economic consequences of future changes in the biogas system. The results from the case study and sensitivity analysis show that the model is reliable and can be used for strategic planning. The results show that implementation of a biogas-based CHP plant result in an electricity power production of approximately 39 GW h annually. Reduced system costs provide a profitability of 46 MSEK/year if electricity and heat prices increase by 100% and electricity certificate prices increase by 50%. CO2 emission reductions up to 32,000 ton/year can be achieved if generated electricity displaces coal-fired condensing power.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
Biogas system, CO2 emissions, Energy systems optimisation, Combined heat and power plant, Marginal electricity
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-85624 (URN)10.1016/j.renene.2012.01.022 (DOI)000309902000051 ()
Available from: 2012-11-26 Created: 2012-11-26 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Danestig, M. & Henning, D. (2008). Efficient heat resource utilisation in energy systems (1ed.). In: Oscar W. Bengtsson,Filip L. Magnusson (Ed.), Energy in Europe: Economics, Policy and Strategy, Filip Magnusson and Oscar W. Bengtsson (eds.) (pp. 315-359). Nova Publishers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Efficient heat resource utilisation in energy systems
2008 (English)In: Energy in Europe: Economics, Policy and Strategy, Filip Magnusson and Oscar W. Bengtsson (eds.) / [ed] Oscar W. Bengtsson,Filip L. Magnusson, Nova Publishers , 2008, 1, p. 315-359Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Energy constitutes the motive force of the civilisation and it determines, in a high degree, the level of economy development as a whole. Despite the increase use of different type of energy, particularly, renewable energy sources, fossil fuels will continue dominating the energy combinations in the world near future. However, oil reserves are declining and this situation would have a negative impact in the future economic development of many countries all over the world. In Europe, the import energy dependency is rising. Unless Europe can make domestic energy more competitive in the next 20 to 30 years, around 70% of the European Unions energy requirements, compared to 50% today, will be met by imported products some of them from regions threatened by insecurity. Now, the energy requirements of the different countries are so high that, for the first time in the humanity's history, there is a need to consider different types of available energy sources and their reserves to plan the economic development of the countries. At the same time, there is also a need to use these sources in the most efficient possible manner in order to sustain that development. The EU leads the world in demand management, in promoting new and renewable forms of energy. If the EU backs up a new common policy with a common voice on energy questions, Europe can lead the global search for energy solutions. However, EU must act urgently because it takes many years to bring innovation on stream in the energy sector, as well as to make productive the investments that are need to update the energy infrastructure in the region. This book provides leading-edge research on this field of study from around the globe.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nova Publishers, 2008 Edition: 1
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17217 (URN)978-1-60456-829-5 (ISBN)1-604-5682-9-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2009-03-11 Created: 2009-03-11 Last updated: 2013-05-24Bibliographically approved
Henning, D. & Trygg, L. (2008). Reduction of electricity use in Swedish industry and its impact on national power supply and European CO2 emissions. Energy Policy, 36(7), 2330-2350
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reduction of electricity use in Swedish industry and its impact on national power supply and European CO2 emissions
2008 (English)In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 36, no 7, p. 2330-2350Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Decreased energy use is crucial for achieving sustainable energy solutions. This paper presents current and possible future electricity use in Swedish industry. Non-heavy lines of business (e.g. food, vehicles) that use one-third of the electricity in Swedish industry are analysed in detail. Most electricity is used in the support processes pumping and ventilation, and manufacturing by decomposition. Energy conservation can take place through e.g. more efficient light fittings and switching off ventilation during night and weekends. By energy-carrier switching, electricity used for heat production is replaced by e.g. fuel. Taking technically possible demand-side measures in the whole lines of business, according to energy audits in a set of factories, means a 35% demand reduction. A systems analysis of power production, trade, demand and conservation was made using the MODEST energy system optimisation model, which uses linear programming and considers the time-dependent impact on demand for days, weeks and seasons. Electricity that is replaced by district heating from a combined heat and power (CHP) plant has a dual impact on the electricity system through reduced demand and increased electricity generation. Reduced electricity consumption and enhanced cogeneration in Sweden enables increased electricity export, which displaces coal-fired condensing plants in the European electricity market and helps to reduce European CO2 emissions. Within the European emission trading system, those electricity conservation measures should be taken that are more cost-efficient than other ways of reducing CO2 emissions. The demand-side measures turn net electricity imports into net export and reduce annual operation costs and net CO2 emissions due to covering Swedish electricity demand by 200 million euros and 6 Mtonne, respectively. With estimated electricity conservation in the whole of Swedish industry, net electricity exports would be larger and net CO2 emissions would be even smaller.

Keywords
Electricity consumption, Energy conservation, Power generation
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14162 (URN)10.1016/j.enpol.2007.08.033 (DOI)
Available from: 2006-11-27 Created: 2006-11-27 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Henning, D. & Danestig, M. (2007). Local development possibilities for sustainable energy supply and use in Sweden. In: In B. Frostell, Å. Danielsson, L. Hagberg, B.-O. Linnér, E. Lisberg Jensen (eds., Science for Sustainable Development - The Social Challenge with emphasis on conditions for change, Proceedings from the 2nd VHU Conference, Linköping 6-7 September, Uppsala: VHU: .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Local development possibilities for sustainable energy supply and use in Sweden
2007 (English)In: In B. Frostell, Å. Danielsson, L. Hagberg, B.-O. Linnér, E. Lisberg Jensen (eds., Science for Sustainable Development - The Social Challenge with emphasis on conditions for change, Proceedings from the 2nd VHU Conference, Linköping 6-7 September, Uppsala: VHU, 2007Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Large structural changes are necessary to reduce the resource use in industrialised countries to a sustainable level. Modifications of municipalities’ normal operations can contribute to a more ecologically, economically and socially sustainable society through, for example, promotion of measures concerning energy conservation and renewable energy supply. In the Swedish Energy Agency’s Sustainable municipality programme, it is developed how spatial plans of ground use and building development can promote local renewable energy sources and efficient energy utilisation. Energy issues can be integrated in spatial planning through scenarios of future energy supply and use, which are discussed by local stakeholders. It can be shown how wall insulation, solar heating and heat recovery can reduce primary energy demand and that switching from electricity to biofuel can reduce CO2 emissions. The indicator heat load density depends on building structure and shows, for instance, preconditions for district heating, which often is a favourable heating option. If the local energy utility is involved in spatial planning, it may facilitate the introduction of temporary solutions, such as pellets boilers, to make more customers chose district heating in areas where the network is delayed. District heating systems enable efficient electricity generation in combined heat and power (CHP) plants, which can be elucidated by an optimisation model that considers economy and environment. Strategic spatial planning can promote establishment and expansion of district heating networks.

Keywords
District heating, energy conservation, heat load density, municipality, renewable
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17216 (URN)
Available from: 2009-03-11 Created: 2009-03-11 Last updated: 2009-03-11Bibliographically approved
Gebremedhin, A., Henning, D. & Palm, J. (2006). Energianalys Vingåker. Eskilstuna: Energimyndighetens förlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energianalys Vingåker
2006 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Eskilstuna: Energimyndighetens förlag, 2006
Series
ER / Energimyndigheten ; 7
Keywords
energi, fjärrvärme, monopol, konkurs, kommun, energianalys, industri, Vingåker
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-33627 (URN)19662 (Local ID)19662 (Archive number)19662 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2018-01-13
Henning, D. & Palm, J. (2006). Energitillförsel och energihushållning i samverkan. Eskilstuna: Energimyndighetens förlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energitillförsel och energihushållning i samverkan
2006 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Eskilstuna: Energimyndighetens förlag, 2006
Series
ER / Energimyndigheten ; 15
Keywords
energi, hushållning, värme, uthållig kommun, samverkan, industri
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-34521 (URN)21611 (Local ID)21611 (Archive number)21611 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2018-01-13
Henning, D., Trygg, L. & Gebremedhin, A. (2006). Enhanced biofuel utilisation in Swedish industries, buildings and district heating. In: the World Bioenergy 2006 Conference and exhibition on Biomass for Energy, Jönköping, Sweden, 30 may – 1 June: (pp. 198-203).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enhanced biofuel utilisation in Swedish industries, buildings and district heating
2006 (English)In: the World Bioenergy 2006 Conference and exhibition on Biomass for Energy, Jönköping, Sweden, 30 may – 1 June, 2006, p. 198-203Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14159 (URN)
Available from: 2006-11-27 Created: 2006-11-27 Last updated: 2009-05-18
Henning, D., Amiri, S. & Holmgren, K. (2006). Modelling and optimisation of electricity, steam and district heating production for a local Swedish utility. European Journal of Operational Research, 175(2), 1224-1247
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modelling and optimisation of electricity, steam and district heating production for a local Swedish utility
2006 (English)In: European Journal of Operational Research, ISSN 0377-2217, E-ISSN 1872-6860, Vol. 175, no 2, p. 1224-1247Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

District heating may help reduce environmental impact and energy costs, but policy instruments and waste management may influence operations. The energy system optimisation model MODEST has been used for 50 towns, regions and a nation. Investments and operation that satisfy energy demand at minimum cost are found through linear programming. This paper describes the application of MODEST to a municipal utility, which uses several fuels and cogeneration plants. The model reflects diurnal and monthly demand fluctuations. Several studies of the Linköping utility are reviewed. These indicate that the marginal heat cost is lower in summer, a new waste or wood fired cogeneration plant is more profitable than a natural-gas-fired combined cycle, material recycling of paper and hard plastics is preferable to waste incineration from an energy-efficiency viewpoint, and considering external costs enhances wood fuel use. Here, an emission limit is used to show how fossil-fuel cogeneration displaces CO2 from coal-condensing plants. © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-43950 (URN)10.1016/j.ejor.2005.06.026 (DOI)75220 (Local ID)75220 (Archive number)75220 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Henning, D., Danestig, M., Holmgren, K. & Gebremedhin, A. (2006). Modelling the impact of policy instruments on district heating operations: experiences from Sweden. In: 10th International Symposium on District Heating and Cooling, Hanover, Germany: .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modelling the impact of policy instruments on district heating operations: experiences from Sweden
2006 (English)In: 10th International Symposium on District Heating and Cooling, Hanover, Germany, 2006Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Emission allowances aim at reducing carbon dioxide emissions in the European Union. Feed-in tariffs and green certificates increase renewable electricity generation in some countries. Undesired energy carriers, such as fossil fuels, can be taxed to decrease consumption. In Sweden, monetary policy instruments have been used for many years, which has influenced district-heating utilities’ operations and investments.

The energy system optimisation model MODEST may help elucidating the impact of policy instruments on choices of fuels and plants. The model can minimise operation and investment costs for satisfying district heating demand, considering revenues from electricity sales and waste reception. It has been used to analyse heat and electricity production for 50 local Swedish utilities. This paper shows how some plants, systems and policy instruments have been modelled and results from some case studies. It may help analysts who face policy instruments, which probably will have a growing influence on district heating operations.

Policy instruments should reflect external costs and induce behaviour that is beneficial from an overall viewpoint. Swedish fossil-fuel taxes hampered cogeneration during many years. Earlier, fuel input could be freely allocated to output energy forms and wood was often used for heat production and coal for electricity generation to minimise taxes. Now, lower taxes promote fossil cogeneration but green certificates make it more profitable to invest in renewable electricity generation.

Carbon dioxide emission allowances can reduce local emissions due to districtheating and electricity production significantly at current price levels but the impact depends on allowance price. With emission trading, investment in a natural-gas-fired cogeneration plant may be beneficial for some utilities due to high electricity prices in the European electricity market, partly caused by emission allowances.

District-heating demand can enable utilisation of resources that otherwise would be of no value. A landfill ban now increases waste incineration, which may reduce industrial waste heat utilisation and heat disposal from cogeneration plants and thereby decrease electricity production. A tax on incinerated waste may reduce the profitability of investing in waste incineration.

Keywords
Energy policy, taxes, green certificates, emission allowances, CHP
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14204 (URN)
Available from: 2007-01-04 Created: 2007-01-04 Last updated: 2009-05-18Bibliographically approved
Henning, D., Trygg, L., Glad, W. & Gustafsson, S.-I. (2005). Socio-technical analyses of energy supply and use in three Swedish municipalities striving toward sustainability. In: Proceeding of the 1st VHU Conference on Science for Sustainable Development, Västerås, Sweden, 14-16 April: (pp. 133–142-).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Socio-technical analyses of energy supply and use in three Swedish municipalities striving toward sustainability
2005 (English)In: Proceeding of the 1st VHU Conference on Science for Sustainable Development, Västerås, Sweden, 14-16 April, 2005, p. 133–142-Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14158 (URN)
Available from: 2006-11-27 Created: 2006-11-27
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