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Waldén, Markus
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Publications (10 of 53) Show all publications
Lindblom, H., Waldén, M., Carlfjord, S. & Hägglund, M. (2019). Limited positive effects on jump-landing technique in girls but not in boys after 8 weeks of injury prevention exercise training in youth football. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Limited positive effects on jump-landing technique in girls but not in boys after 8 weeks of injury prevention exercise training in youth football
2019 (English)In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To evaluate changes in jump-landing technique in football-playing boys and girls after 8 weeks of injury prevention training.

METHODS: Four boys' and four girls' teams (mean age 14.1 ± 0.8 years) were instructed to use either the original Knee Control injury prevention exercise programme (IPEP) or a further developed IPEP, Knee Control + , at every training session for 8 weeks. Baseline and follow-up testing of jump-landing technique included drop vertical jumps (DVJ), assessed subjectively and with two-dimensional movement analysis, and tuck jump assessment (TJA).

RESULTS: Only minor differences in intervention effects were seen between the two IPEPs, and results are therefore presented for both intervention groups combined. At baseline 30% of the boys showed good knee control during the DVJ, normalised knee separation distances of 77-96% (versus hip) and a median of 3 flaws during the TJA. Among girls, 22% showed good knee control, normalised knee separation distances of 67-86% and a median of 4 flaws during the TJA. At follow-up, boys and girls performed significantly more jumps during TJA. No changes in jump-landing technique were seen in boys, whereas girls improved their knee flexion angle at initial contact in the DVJ (mean change + 4.7°, p < 0.001, 95% CI 2.36-6.99, d = 0.7) and their TJA total score (- 1 point, p = 0.045, r = - 0.4).

CONCLUSION: The study showed small positive effects on jump-landing technique in girls, but not in boys, after 8 weeks of injury prevention training.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level II.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinical Trials gov identifier: NCT03251404.

Keywords
Effect mechanisms, Movement quality, Neuromuscular training
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-160777 (URN)10.1007/s00167-019-05721-x (DOI)31541293 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-07 Created: 2019-10-07 Last updated: 2019-12-03
Asker, M., Holm, L. W., Kallberg, H., Waldén, M. & Skillgate, E. (2018). Female adolescent elite handball players are more susceptible to shoulder problems than their male counterparts. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 26(7), 1892-1900
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Female adolescent elite handball players are more susceptible to shoulder problems than their male counterparts
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2018 (English)In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 1892-1900Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Shoulder problems are frequent among senior elite handball players. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of shoulder problems among adolescent elite handball players and to investigate potential differences in gender, school grade, playing position and playing level. During the 2014 and 2015 pre-season periods, 471 players (age 15-18 years, 54% female) completed a comprehensive baseline questionnaire regarding history of any shoulder pain and shoulder problems experienced during the past season. The players were monitored weekly for one competition season (September-April) regarding shoulder problems and the amount of match and training. Generalised linear models with a binomial link function were used to calculate a prevalence ratio (PR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) to compare the subgroups of players. In total, 110 players (23%) reported having substantial shoulder problems (defined as moderate/severe reduction in training volume, or moderate/severe reduction in performance, or complete inability to participate) at some point during the follow-up season, of which almost half reported complete inability to participate. Of those players reporting substantial problems, 43% (95% CI 39-48) did so for at least 3 consecutive weeks during the season. The prevalence was significantly higher in female players (PR 1.46, 95% 1.04-2.06) and in backcourt players (PR 1.58, 95% CI 1.08-2.32), but no differences were found for school grade (PR 1.21 95% CI 0.88-1.67) or playing level (PR 1.09 95% CI 0.76-1.56). The prevalence of substantial shoulder problems in adolescent elite handball players is high, especially among females, and this warrants further studies on risk factors for shoulder injury and the development of prevention strategies in handball players already before the age of 15. These findings also highlight the importance of introducing a clinical monitoring programme on a routine basis and improving the medical support, taking gender-related aspects into consideration, at handball-profiled secondary schools. II.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2018
Keywords
Athletic injuries; Prevalence; Overuse injury; Overhead sport; Throwing injury; Glenohumeral joint
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149872 (URN)10.1007/s00167-018-4857-y (DOI)000437249800003 ()29427220 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Centrum for Idrottsforskning [CIF 2015/11, CIF 2016/6]; Folksam Insurance Company; Swedish Naprapathic Association

Available from: 2018-08-02 Created: 2018-08-02 Last updated: 2019-05-01
Waldén, M., Hägglund, M., Bengtsson, H. & Ekstrand, J. (2018). Perspectives in football medicine. Der Unfallchirurg (Berlin. Print), 121(6), 470-474
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perspectives in football medicine
2018 (English)In: Der Unfallchirurg (Berlin. Print), ISSN 0177-5537, E-ISSN 1433-044X, Vol. 121, no 6, p. 470-474Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The high injury rate among mens professional football players is well-known. Therefore, the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) launched an injury study already in 2001. This study, the UEFA Elite Club Injury Study (ECIS), currently includes data from a total of 51 clubs from 18 European countries with more than 14,000 registered injuries. With the 21(st) World Cup (WC) in Russia just around the corner, we have from our study identified a higher match injury rate and a higher proportion of severe injuries in the European Championships compared to the preceding club competitive seasons. Moreover, we have also recently showed that the muscle injury rate is higher when players are given a recovery window of five days or less between two matches. Considering the congested match schedule of the upcoming WC, it is therefore likely that injuries and fatigue once again will be a topic of discussion this summer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
Research; UEFA; Injury; Epidemiology; Prevention
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149373 (URN)10.1007/s00113-018-0496-5 (DOI)000434044100011 ()29651514 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-07-02 Created: 2018-07-02 Last updated: 2018-08-10
Waldén, M., Hägglund, M., Magnusson, H. & Ekstrand, J. (2016). ACL injuries in mens professional football: a 15-year prospective study on time trends and return-to-play rates reveals only 65% of players still play at the top level 3 years after ACL rupture. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 50(12), 744-750
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ACL injuries in mens professional football: a 15-year prospective study on time trends and return-to-play rates reveals only 65% of players still play at the top level 3 years after ACL rupture
2016 (English)In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 744-750Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Studies investigating the development of ACL injuries over time in football are scarce and more data on what happens before and after return to play (RTP) are needed. Aim To investigate (1) time trends in ACL injury rates, (2) complication rates before return to match play following ACL reconstruction, and (3) the influence of ACL injury on the subsequent playing career in male professional football players. Methods 78 clubs were followed between 2001 and 2015. Time trend in ACL injury rate was analysed using linear regression. ACL-injured players were monitored until RTP and tracked for 3 years after RTP. Results We recorded 157 ACL injuries, 140 total and 17 partial ruptures, with a non-significant average annual increase in the ACL injury rate by 6% (R-2=0.13, b=0.059, 95% CI -0.04 to 0.15, p=0.20). The match ACL injury rate was 20-fold higher than the training injury rate (0.340 vs 0.017 per 1000 h). 138 players (98.6%) with a total rupture underwent ACL reconstruction; all 134 players with RTP data (4 players still under rehabilitation) were able to return to training, but 9 of them (6.7%) suffered complications before their first match appearance (5 reruptures and 4 other knee surgeries). The median layoff after ACL reconstruction was 6.6 months to training and 7.4 months to match play. We report 3-year follow-up data for 106 players in total; 91 players (85.8%) were still playing football and 60 of 93 players (65%) with ACL reconstruction for a total rupture played at the same level. Conclusions The ACL injury rate has not declined during the 2000s and the rerupture rate before return to match play was 4%. The RTP rate within a year after ACL reconstruction was very high, but only two-thirds competed at the highest level 3 years later.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, 2016
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129482 (URN)10.1136/bjsports-2015-095952 (DOI)000376762000010 ()27034129 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|UEFA; Swedish Football Association; Football Association Premier League Limited; Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports

Available from: 2016-06-21 Created: 2016-06-20 Last updated: 2017-11-28
Ekstrand, J., Waldén, M. & Hägglund, M. (2016). Hamstring injuries have increased by 4% annually in mens professional football, since 2001: a 13-year longitudinal analysis of the UEFA Elite Club injury study. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 50(12), 731-737
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hamstring injuries have increased by 4% annually in mens professional football, since 2001: a 13-year longitudinal analysis of the UEFA Elite Club injury study
2016 (English)In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 731-737Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background There are limited data on hamstring injury rates over time in football. Aim To analyse time trends in hamstring injury rates in male professional footballers over 13 consecutive seasons and to distinguish the relative contribution of training and match injuries. Methods 36 clubs from 12 European countries were followed between 2001 and 2014. Team medical staff recorded individual player exposure and time-loss injuries. Injuries per 1000 h were compared as a rate ratio (RR) with 95% CI. Injury burden was the number of lay off days per 1000 h. Seasonal trend for injury was analysed using linear regression. Results A total of 1614 hamstring injuries were recorded; 22% of players sustained at least one hamstring injury during a season. The overall hamstring injury rate over the 13-year period was 1.20 injuries per 1000 h; the match injury rate (4.77) being 9 times higher than the training injury rate (0.51; RR 9.4; 95% CI 8.5 to 10.4). The time-trend analysis showed an annual average 2.3% year on year increase in the total hamstring injury rate over the 13-year period (R-2=0.431, b=0.023, 95% CI 0.006 to 0.041, p=0.015). This increase over time was most pronounced for training injuries-these increased by 4.0% per year (R-2=0.450, b=0.040, 95% CI 0.011 to 0.070, p=0.012). The average hamstring injury burden was 19.7 days per 1000 h (annual average increase 4.1%) (R-2=0.437, b=0.041, 95% CI 0.010 to 0.072, p=0.014). Conclusions Training-related hamstring injury rates have increased substantially since 2001 but match-related injury rates have remained stable. The challenge is for clubs to reduce training-related hamstring injury rates without impairing match performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, 2016
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129480 (URN)10.1136/bjsports-2015-095359 (DOI)000376762000008 ()26746908 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|UEFA; Swedish Football Association; Football Association Premier League Limited; Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports

Available from: 2016-06-21 Created: 2016-06-20 Last updated: 2017-11-28
Kristenson, K., Bjørneboe, J., Waldén, M., Andersen, T. E., Ekstrand, J. & Hägglund, M. (2016). Injuries in male professional football: a prospective comparison between individual and team-based exposure registration. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 26(10), 1225-1232
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Injuries in male professional football: a prospective comparison between individual and team-based exposure registration
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2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 26, no 10, p. 1225-1232Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Methodological considerations of football injury epidemiology have only scarcely been described. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inter-rater agreement in injury capture rate and injury categorisation for data registered in two different prospective injury surveillance audits studying the same two Norwegian male professional football clubs for two consecutive seasons, 2008-2009. One audit used team-based exposure (TBE) recording and the other individual-based exposure (IBE). The number of injuries recorded and corresponding injury rates (injuries/1000 h exposure) were compared between audits. Cohen’s Kappa and Prevalence Adjusted Bias Adjusted Kappa (PABAK) coefficients were calculated for injury variables. Of 323 injuries included, the IBE audit captured 318 (overall capture rate 98.5%, training 98.9%, match 97.8%) and the TBE audit 303 injuries (overall capture rate 93.8%, training 91.4%, match 97.1%). Agreement analysis showed Kappa and PABAK coefficients regarded as almost perfect (> 0.81) for 8 of 9 injury variables, and substantial (ƙ 0.75) for the variable injury severity. In conclusion, the capture rate for training injuries was slightly higher with individual-based exposure recording, and inter-agreement in injury categorisation was very high.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2016
Keywords
Elite, epidemiology, methodology, reliability, soccer, validity
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117169 (URN)10.1111/sms.12551 (DOI)000386937200011 ()26376838 (PubMedID)
Note

At the time for thesis presentation publication was in status: Manuscript

Funding agencies: Union of European Football Associations; Swedish Football Association; Football Association Premier League Limited; Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports; County Council of Ostergotland; Royal Norwegian Ministry of Culture and Church Affairs; Sou

Available from: 2015-04-21 Created: 2015-04-21 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Hägglund, M., Waldén, M. & Ekstrand, J. (2016). Injury recurrence is lower at the highest professional football level than at national and amateur levels: does sports medicine and sports physiotherapy deliver?. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 50(12), 751-758
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Injury recurrence is lower at the highest professional football level than at national and amateur levels: does sports medicine and sports physiotherapy deliver?
2016 (English)In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 751-758Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Previous injury is a well-documented risk factor for football injury. The time trends and patterns of recurrent injuries at different playing levels are not clear. Aim To compare recurrent injury proportions, incidences and patterns between different football playing levels, and to study time trends in recurrent injury incidence. Methods Time-loss injuries were collected from injury surveillance of 43 top-level European professional teams (240 team-seasons), 19 Swedish premier division teams (82 team-seasons) and 10 Swedish amateur teams (10 team-seasons). Recurrent injury was defined as an injury of the same type and at the same site as an index injury within the preceding year, with injury amp;lt;2 months defined as an early recurrence, and amp;gt;2 months as a delayed recurrence. Seasonal trend for recurrent injury incidence, expressed as the average annual percentage of change, was analysed using linear regression. Results 13 050 injuries were included, 2449 (18.8%) being recurrent injuries, with 1944 early (14.9%) and 505 delayed recurrences (3.9%). Recurrence proportions were highest in the second half of the competitive season for all cohorts. Recurrence proportions differed between playing levels, with 35.1% in the amateur cohort, 25.0% in the Swedish elite cohort and 16.6% in the European cohort (chi(2) overall effect, pamp;lt;0.001). A decreasing trend was observed in recurrent injury incidence in the European cohort, a -2.9% average annual change over the 14-year study period (95% CI -5.4% to -0.4%, p=0.026). Similarly, a decreasing tendency was also seen in the Swedish premier division. Conclusions Recurrence proportions showed an inverse relationship with playing level, and recurrent injury incidence has decreased over the past decade.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, 2016
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129483 (URN)10.1136/bjsports-2015-095951 (DOI)000376762000011 ()27015858 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|UEFA; Swedish Football Association; Football Association Premier League Limited; Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports

Available from: 2016-06-21 Created: 2016-06-20 Last updated: 2017-11-28
Kristenson, K., Bjørneboe, J., Waldén, M., Ekstrand, J., Andersen, T. E. & Hägglund, M. (2016). No association between surface shifts and time-loss overuse injury risk in male professional football: a prospective cohort study. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 19(3), 218-221
Open this publication in new window or tab >>No association between surface shifts and time-loss overuse injury risk in male professional football: a prospective cohort study
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, ISSN 1440-2440, E-ISSN 1878-1861, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 218-221Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To investigate frequent surface shifts, match play on an unaccustomed surface, and climate type as potential risk factors for injury in Scandinavian male professional football.

Design: Prospective cohort study.

Methods: 32 clubs from two climate zones, warm temperate (n=19) and snow climates (n=13), were followed during seasons 2010 and 2011. The association between number of surface shifts during fivematch sequences and subsequent overuse injury risk was evaluated with generalized estimating equations. Injury rate was expressed as time loss injuries/1000 hours, and compared between groups with a rate ratio and 95% confidence interval (CI).

Results: No association was found between the number of surface shifts and subsequent overuse injury risk (risk ratio 1.01, 95% CI 0.91-1.12). Grass clubs (grass installed at home venue) had a lower match injury rate when playing away matches on artificial turf vs. away matches on grass (rate ratio 0.66, 95% CI 0.40-0.89). Analyses on the total cohort showed no difference in injury rates between clubs in the two climate zones, but sub-analyses revealed that grass clubs from the snow climate zone had lower training and match injury rates than grass clubs from the warm temperate zone (rate ratio 0.69, 95% CI 0.55-0.87).

Conclusions: No influence on injury risk was seen from frequent surface shifts or from playing matches on an unaccustomed surface. Climate type at club home venue had minimal influence on injury rates.

Keywords
Epidemiology, Lower extremity, Soccer, Surface, Surveillance
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117166 (URN)10.1016/j.jsams.2015.06.001 (DOI)000371445600006 ()
Note

Funding agencies:  Union of European Football Associations; Swedish Football Association; Football Association Premier League Limited; Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports; Region Ostergotland; Royal Norwegian Ministry of Culture and Church Affairs; South-Eastern 

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Available from: 2015-04-21 Created: 2015-04-21 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Hägglund, M. & Waldén, M. (2016). Risk factors for acute knee injury in female youth football.. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 24(3), 737-746
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk factors for acute knee injury in female youth football.
2016 (English)In: Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, ISSN 0942-2056, E-ISSN 1433-7347, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 737-746Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To prospectively evaluate risk factors for acute time-loss knee injury, in particular ACL injury, in female youth football players.andlt;br /andgt;Methods: Risk factors were studied in 4556 players aged 12-17 years from a randomised controlled trial during the 2009 season. Covariates were both intrinsic (body mass index, age, relative age effect, onset of menarche, previous acute knee injury or ACL injury, current knee complaints, and familial disposition of ACL injury) and extrinsic (no. of training sessions/week, no. of matches/week, match exposure ratio, match play with other teams, and artificial turf exposure). Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated from individual variable and multiple Cox regression analyses.andlt;br /andgt;Results: Ninety-six acute knee injuries were recorded, 21 of them ACL injuries. Multiple Cox regression showed a fourfold higher ACL injury rate for players with familial disposition of ACL injury (HR 3.57; 95 % CI 1.48-8.62). Significant predictor variables for acute knee injury were age andgt;14 years (HR 1.97; 95 % CI 1.30-2.97), knee complaints at the start of the season (HR 1.98; 95 % CI 1.30-3.02), and familial disposition of ACL injury (HR 1.96; 95 % CI 1.22-3.16). No differences in injury rates were seen when playing on artificial turf compared with natural grass.andlt;br /andgt;Conclusion: Female youth football players with a familial disposition of ACL injury had an increased risk of ACL injury and acute knee injury. Older players and those with knee complaints at pre-season were more at risk of acute knee injury. Although the predictive values were low, these factors could be used in athlete screening to target preventive interventions.andlt;br /andgt;Level Of Evidence: II.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125909 (URN)10.1007/s00167-015-3922-z (DOI)000371300400016 ()26704794 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies:We thank all the coaches and players who participated in the study as well as the study therapists and study physicians constituting the medical support to the teams. Professor Per Renstrom, MD, PhD, Mrs Annica Nasmark, PT, and Mrs Anneli Gustafsson from the Swedish Football Association (FA) are gratefully acknowledged for study assistance. Isam Atroshi, MD, PhD, Philippe Wagner, MSc, and Henrik Magnusson, MSc, are acknowledged for their contribution to the original RCT. The study was financially supported by the Swedish FA and the Folksam Insurance Company. This research also received grants from the Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports and the Hassleholm Hospital.

Available from: 2016-03-08 Created: 2016-03-08 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Bjorneboe, J., Kristensson, K., Waldén, M., Bengtsson, H., Ekstrand, J., Hägglund, M., . . . Einar Andersen, T. (2016). Role of illness in male professional football: not a major contributor to time loss. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 50(11), 699-702
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Role of illness in male professional football: not a major contributor to time loss
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2016 (English)In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 11, p. 699-702Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background There are limited data on the nature, type and incidence of illness in football. Previous studies indicate that gastrointestinal and respiratory tract illnesses are most common. Aim To describe the incidence and burden of illness in male professional football. Methods Over the 4-year study period, 2011-2014, 73 professional football teams in Europe participated, with a total of 1 261 367 player-days recorded. All time-loss illnesses were recorded by the medical staff of each club. A recordable illness episode was any physical or psychological symptom (not related to injury) that resulted in the player being unable to participate fully in training or match play. Results A total of 1914 illness episodes were recorded. The illness incidence was 1.5 per 1000 player-days, meaning that, on average, a player experienced an illness episode every second season, with a median of 3 days absence per illness episode. Severe illness (absence amp;gt;4 weeks) constituted 2% of all illnesses. Respiratory tract illness was the most common (58%), followed by gastrointestinal illness (38%). Respiratory tract illness, gastrointestinal illness and cardiovascular illness caused the highest illness burden. Conclusions The illness incidence among male professional football players is low compared with the injury incidence. We found that the highest illness burden was caused by illness to the respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract and cardiovascular system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, 2016
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129668 (URN)10.1136/bjsports-2015-095921 (DOI)000376761700017 ()27034126 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|UEFA; Swedish Football Association; Football Association Premier League Limited; Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports; Royal Norwegian Ministry of Culture and Church Affairs; South-Eastern Norway Regional Health Authority; IOC; Norwegian Olympic Committee & Confederation of Sport; Norsk Tipping AS

Available from: 2016-06-23 Created: 2016-06-23 Last updated: 2018-03-20
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