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Samuelsson, Christina
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Publications (10 of 48) Show all publications
Johansson, I.-L., Samuelsson, C. & Müller, N. (2019). Patients’ and communication partners’ experiences of communicative changes in Parkinson’s disease. Disability and Rehabilitation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients’ and communication partners’ experiences of communicative changes in Parkinson’s disease
2019 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The aim of the present study was to investigate the experiences of people with Parkinson’s disease and their close communication partners regarding disease-related communicative changes and participation in everyday conversations.

Materials and methods: Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with six dyads consisting of a person with Parkinson’s disease and a close communication partner. The interview material was analysed through thematic analysis.

Results: The main theme was the experiences of barriers and facilitators for participation in conversations. Subthemes were experiences related to changes in voice and articulation, language and cognition, body language and facial expressions, fatigue, self-image, communicative initiative, and familiarity with conversation partner. The results show individual variation. A change observed in almost all dyads was the person with Parkinson’s disease participating less in conversations.

Conclusions: Assessment and interventions should be based on a broad perspective on communication, and individuals’ priorities should be foregrounded in intervention planning. Both the person with Parkinson’s disease and communication partners need to make adjustments for communication to work. Therefore, close communication partners should be included in assessment and intervention of communicationin Parkinson’s disease from an early stage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Communication; participation; dysarthria; Parkinson’s disease; experiences; communication partner
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155068 (URN)10.1080/09638288.2018.1539875 (DOI)30669899 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060575229 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-12 Created: 2019-03-12 Last updated: 2019-07-26Bibliographically approved
Sundström, S., Lyxell, B. & Samuelsson, C. (2018). Prosodic aspects of repetition in Swedish-speaking children with developmental language disorder. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prosodic aspects of repetition in Swedish-speaking children with developmental language disorder
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, ISSN 1754-9507, E-ISSN 1754-9515Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To examine repetition of stress and tonal word accents in real words and non-words in Swedish-speaking children with developmental language disorder (DLD), and to investigate the relation of prosodic repetition to measures of language ability.

Method: A cross-sectional study was undertaken with 30 monolingual Swedish-speaking children with DLD, mean age 4;11 (years;months) and 29 age-matched controls, mean age 5;1, who repeated words and non-words with systematically varying prosody. Group differences for the repetition of prosodic features, and correlations between repetition and phonology, grammar, and vocabulary, were explored.

Result: Children with DLD performed below controls on repetition of prosodic features of words and non-words. Repetition of stress and tonal word accent was not correlated with phonological production or receptive vocabulary, but a significant correlation was found between stress repetition in words and expressive grammar.

Conclusion: Repetition of stress and tonal word accents is challenging for children with DLD acquiring Swedish as their first language, but may not be a good indicator of general language ability. Prosody should be taken into account when interpreting results from clinically used word repetition (WR) and non-word repetition (NWR) tasks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
children, language disorder, word repetition, non-word repetition, prosody, Swedish
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154583 (URN)10.1080/17549507.2018.1508500 (DOI)30557520 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85058710025 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-02-20 Created: 2019-02-20 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
Larsson, E., Ekström, A. & Samuelsson, C. (2018). Recycling narratives as a joint accomplishment in interaction with people with dementia. In: : . Paper presented at 5th International Conference on Conversation Analysis, Loughborough, July 11-15, 2018..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recycling narratives as a joint accomplishment in interaction with people with dementia
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This presentation focuses on recycling of stories in conversations involving people with dementia. In dementia, communicative ability gradually deteriorates as the disease progresses typically leading to profound decline of communicative skills in the late stage. Of all of the domains affected by dementia diseases, communication is one of the areas where people with dementia and their caregivers experience most challenges. A significant characteristic for persons with dementia is a tendency to tell the same stories over and over (e.g. Hydén et al., 2013). While the significance conversational partners have on the organization of stories told by people with dementia are highly recognized (e.g. Hydén, et al., 2013; Hydén, 2011), how conversational partners to people with dementia orient toward recycling of stories are still in need of further investigation. In previous research, the phenomenon of recycling stories is mainly credited to the person with dementia. In our present study, we would like to propose another parallel point of view in which caregivers also tend to recycle stories repetitively in conversation with persons with dementia. We argue that recycling of stories in interaction involving people with dementia is a highly collaborative activity, and sometimes even initiated by conversational partners to people with dementia. In this presentation, we focus on how recycling of stories are sequentially organized is ordinary interaction between people with dementia and professional caregivers. The data consist of video recordings of 4 dyads (one person diagnosed with dementia and a professional caregiver in each dyad) totaling approximately 2,5 hours of recordings. In the analyses, we have focused specifically on how the telling of recycled stories is initiated in conversation, and what kind of feedback such stories receive. Our analyses show that recycled stories told by persons with dementia receive strong interactional support from conversational partners by, for example, the use of responses signaling newness and surprise (cf. Hydén et al., 2013). Conversational partners are also actively involved in the telling of recycled stories by, for example, asking guiding questions expanding the stories and use prompting techniques in cases where the person with dementia seem to have difficulties telling the whole story. In our analyses, we have also seen examples where conversational partners to people with dementia not only support the telling of recycled stories, but actually initiate such stories by instructing the person with dementia to talk about a specific topic.

National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150192 (URN)
Conference
5th International Conference on Conversation Analysis, Loughborough, July 11-15, 2018.
Available from: 2018-08-16 Created: 2018-08-16 Last updated: 2019-02-06
Ekström, A., Ferm, U. & Samuelsson, C. (2017). Digital communication support and Alzheimer’s disease. Dementia, 16(6), 711-731
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital communication support and Alzheimer’s disease
2017 (English)In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 711-731Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Communication is one of the areas where people with dementia and their caregivers experience most challenges. The purpose of this study is to contribute to the understanding of possibilities and pitfalls of using personalized communication applications installed on tablet computers to support communication for people with dementia and their conversational partners. The study is based on video recordings of a woman, 52 years old, with Alzheimer’s disease interacting with her husband in their home. The couple was recorded interacting with and without a tablet computer including a personalized communication application. The results from the present study reveal both significant possibilities and potential difficulties in introducing a digital communication device to people with dementia and their conversational partners. For the woman in the present study, the amount of interactive actions and the number of communicative actions seem to increase with the use of the communication application. The results also indicate that problems associated with dementia are foregrounded in interaction where the tablet computer is used.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
Alzheimer’s disease, communication support, interaction, tablet computers, video recordings
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125627 (URN)10.1177/1471301215615456 (DOI)000407560100004 ()26643684 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Foundation for Humanities and Social Sciences

Available from: 2016-02-27 Created: 2016-02-27 Last updated: 2018-05-03
From, A., Sundström, S. & Samuelsson, C. (2016). Differences in phonologic and prosodic abilities in children with phonological language impairment and phonological-grammatical language impairment assessed with non-word repetition. Logopedics, Phoniatrics, Vocology, 41(2), 66-76
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differences in phonologic and prosodic abilities in children with phonological language impairment and phonological-grammatical language impairment assessed with non-word repetition
2016 (English)In: Logopedics, Phoniatrics, Vocology, ISSN 1401-5439, E-ISSN 1651-2022, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 66-76Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Prosody can be described as the rhythmic, dynamic, and melodic aspects of language. Swedish has a relatively complex prosodic system compared to, for example, English. A large percentage of Swedish children with language impairment show prosodic problems to some extent. In the present study, non-word repetition was used to assess the phonological and prosodic abilities in children with phonological language impairment and children with phonological-grammatical language impairment. In the study, 10 children with phonological language impairment and 14 children with phonological-grammatical language impairment from 4;3 to 6;2 years of age participated. All children heard the same recorded non-words and words. The group with phonological language impairment received higher scores in all variables, compared to the group with phonological-grammatical language impairment. The results showed significant differences between the groups regarding production of vowels correct in words and production of phonemes correct in non-words as well as production of unstressed syllables in non-words and production of correct stress in non-words. Percent correctly produced vowels in words, but not in non-words, correlated significantly with grammatical ability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2016
Keywords
Children; phonology; prosody; non-word; language impairment
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127555 (URN)10.3109/14015439.2014.982171 (DOI)000373838600002 ()25436899 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-05-04 Created: 2016-05-03 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Samuelsson, C., Ekström, A., Majlesi, A. R. & Plejert, C. (2016). Kommunikation vid demens (1ed.). In: Ingrid Hellström & Lars-Christer Hydén (Ed.), Att leva med demens: (pp. 63-70). Gleerups Utbildning AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kommunikation vid demens
2016 (Swedish)In: Att leva med demens / [ed] Ingrid Hellström & Lars-Christer Hydén, Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016, 1, p. 63-70Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016 Edition: 1
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125461 (URN)978-91-4069-165-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-02-24 Created: 2016-02-24 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Samuelsson, C., Lundeborg Hammarström, I. & Plejert, C. (2016). Video Recording as a Tool for Assessing Children’s Everyday Use of Features Targeted in Phonological Intervention. Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders/Equinox, 7(1), 27-48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Video Recording as a Tool for Assessing Children’s Everyday Use of Features Targeted in Phonological Intervention
2016 (English)In: Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders/Equinox, ISSN 2040-5111, E-ISSN 2040-512X, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 27-48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The last decades, speech and language pathology services have been subject to changes, and there has been a growing demand for intervention activities to be effective and evidence-based. The aim of the present study was to investigate if and how video recording can be used to assess the use of features targeted in phonological intervention, in everyday talk by children with LI. Three five-year-old girls with phonological problems participated in the study, and data consist of video recordings of intervention sessions and of interaction at home. Three different paths of development were identified: Some targeted speech sounds are displayed in everyday interaction; Targeted speech sound is present in intervention-like activity; No displays of targeted sounds. The results of the present study clearly demonstrate that the use of video recordings, transcriptions and analysis of interaction outside of the clinical setting contribute important information that may guide planning, goal-setting and evaluation of intervention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Equinox Publishing, 2016
National Category
Other Health Sciences General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130716 (URN)10.1558/jircd.v6i2.25725 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-08-22 Created: 2016-08-22 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Samuelsson, C. & Plejert, C. (2015). On the use of Conversation Analysis and retrospection in intervention for children with language impairment. Child Language Teaching and Therapy, 31(1), 19-36
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the use of Conversation Analysis and retrospection in intervention for children with language impairment
2015 (English)In: Child Language Teaching and Therapy, ISSN 0265-6590, E-ISSN 1477-0865, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 19-36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Models of speech and language intervention for communicative disabilities vary from structured programmes to more interactive and ecological methods (Fey, 1986). Ideally, a model for intervention should fit the interests and personality of the patient, focus on crucial aspects of speech and language, and be suited to the patients everyday communication needs (Johnston, 2006). The present article addresses how features of everyday interaction and speech and language intervention may be captured and used for children with language impairment (LI), their caretakers, and speech and language therapists (SLTs), within and outside of clinical practice. Specifically, the aim of the study is to explore the use of retrospection (Erickson and Schultz, 1982), based on Conversation Analytical (CA) methodology (e.g. Schegloff, 2007), and to establish if and how CA-based retrospection may contribute to raising participants awareness of their own and others interactional behaviours. Retrospection here refers to sessions where participants watch and comment on sequences of video-recordings from intervention, as well as from situations captured in a variety of everyday settings. Four children with LI and three speech and language therapists participated, as well as parents of the children. The procedure comprised analysis and transcription of video-recordings of everyday interaction and intervention involving the children, retrospections with the children, the parents of the children with LI, and the SLTs, and analysis and transcription of the recordings made of the retrospections. The analysis of the retrospections generated four categories of phenomena relevant for intervention and everyday interaction: (I) Observations of well-functioning interaction strategies; (2) Observations of less well-functioning interaction strategies; (3) Assessment of positive performance; and (4) Comments relating to intervention. The results show that CA-based retrospection may be used to raise the participants awareness of their own interactional behaviours, and provide the opportunity to discuss strategies relevant for both intervention and everyday interaction for children with LI.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE Publications (UK and US), 2015
Keywords
Conversation Analysis; interaction; intervention; language impairment; retrospection
National Category
Clinical Medicine Languages and Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114980 (URN)10.1177/0265659014532477 (DOI)000348749300002 ()
Available from: 2015-03-10 Created: 2015-03-06 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Samuelsson, C., Hjalmarsson Österholm, J. & Olaison, A. (2015). Orally Positioning Older People in Assessment Meetings. Educational gerontology, 41(11), 767-785
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Orally Positioning Older People in Assessment Meetings
2015 (English)In: Educational gerontology, ISSN 0360-1277, E-ISSN 1521-0472, Vol. 41, no 11, p. 767-785Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It has been demonstrated that persons with dementia may be positioned as less competent than participants of the same age without dementia, and that persons with dementia possibly also are positioned as less competent than other older persons without dementia. In the present study, we aim to explore this further by analysing Swedish assessment meetings, in which needs and preferences are investigated for older persons without dementia. The material consists five audio-recorded assessment meetings, where there were at least two conversational partners present (a spouse and/or a child) and where the older person applying for social services was not diagnosed with dementia. The ages of the older persons ranged from 81 to 88, while the age of the relatives ranged from 46 to 93. The results of the present study demonstrate that older persons without dementia mainly are positioned as competent. However, it may be related to the degree of frailty, since the frailest person in the present study appears to be positioned as less competent than the other participants. The present paper adds to existing knowledge on how professionals in assessment meetings contribute to the positioning of older persons as competent and capable of making decisions. The results of the present article may be useful to promote development of education and training of communication skills for care mangers in assessments in order to further ensure that older persons with and without cognitive impairments can be actively involved in the creation and interpretation of their applications for social services.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2015
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-118085 (URN)10.1080/03601277.2015.1039470 (DOI)000359635600003 ()
Note

Funders: Swedish Riksbankens Jubileumsfond [M10-0187:1]

Available from: 2015-05-21 Created: 2015-05-21 Last updated: 2018-05-16
Hjalmarsson Österholm, J. & Samuelsson, C. (2015). Orally positioning persons with dementia in assessment meetings. Ageing & Society, 35(2), 367-388
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Orally positioning persons with dementia in assessment meetings
2015 (English)In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 367-388Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper the authors study if and how persons with dementia are orally positioned by others, and how they position themselves while participating in assessment meetings held in order to discuss access to supportive services. We analysed five assessment meetings where two older persons (one diagnosed with dementia and one without a dementia diagnosis) participated to investigate whether the person with dementia is positioned differently than the other old person. Interactional phenomena used to position the person with dementia were identified by interactional analysis.

The paperidentifies six phenomena that positioned the person with dementia as an individual with less interactional competence than the other participants: ignoring the person with dementia; voicing the feelings, capacity or opinion of the person with dementia; posing questions implying lack of competence; others' use of diagnosis; self-(re)positioning; and elderspeak. Persons with dementia are often orally positioned as less competent, indicating that they suffer further from discrimination than other older persons. We suggest that this has an impact on the participation of people with dementia in negotiations regarding their future care. The results indicate that social workers should be made aware that negative positioning exists and how it may affect the ability of people with dementia to contribute to discussions about their everyday life. Social workers should be encouraged to find strategies to reduce negative positioning in interaction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015
Keywords
Äldreriktat tal positionerna biståndshandläggarsamtal demens
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103361 (URN)10.1017/S0144686X13000755 (DOI)000357881000007 ()
Available from: 2014-01-17 Created: 2014-01-17 Last updated: 2018-05-16
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