liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Eriksson, Henrik
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 84) Show all publications
Rankin, A., Linder, R., Sainz, M., Rosenqvist, S., Bång, M. & Eriksson, H. (2017). City Resilience: Analysis of Strategies World-Wide. In: Proceedings of the 7th REA symposium: . Paper presented at Resilience Engineering Association Symposium Liége, Belgum, 26-29 June, 2017. Sophia Antipolis Cedex, France: Resilience Engineering Association
Open this publication in new window or tab >>City Resilience: Analysis of Strategies World-Wide
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the 7th REA symposium, Sophia Antipolis Cedex, France: Resilience Engineering Association , 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In recent years, resilience has become an important goal for cities, particularly in the face of political uncertainty, climate change and increasing urbanisation. Resilience theory has yielded informative lessons and brought new perspective when preparing for, and responding to vulnerabilities cities face today, such as natural hazards and social inequalities. However, critical questions on how to operationalize resilience through political decision making and community engagement are still unanswered, and supporting methods and concrete action plans are needed. In this paper, we offer an overview of the result from three studies conducted as part of an ongoing H2020 research project, Smart Mature Resilience. The three studies inlucde a literature review of definitions and approaches in city resilience, analysis of city resilience strategies and requirements for standardization. Key findings from the studies are presented and implications of their findings for the development of resiliience management guidelines are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sophia Antipolis Cedex, France: Resilience Engineering Association, 2017
Keywords
Resilience, Cities, Strategies, Guidelines, Standardisation
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-141270 (URN)
Conference
Resilience Engineering Association Symposium Liége, Belgum, 26-29 June, 2017
Projects
Smart Mature Resilience (SMR) EU H2020
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020
Available from: 2017-09-28 Created: 2017-09-28 Last updated: 2018-04-03Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, H., Timpka, T., Spreco, A., Dahlström, Ö., Strömgren, M. & Holm, E. (2016). Dynamic Multicore Processing for Pandemic Influenza Simulation.. In: AMIA Annual Symposium Proceedings: . Paper presented at AMIA 2016 Annual Symposium November 12-16, 2016, Chicago,IL (pp. 534-540). American Medical Informatics Association, 2016
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamic Multicore Processing for Pandemic Influenza Simulation.
Show others...
2016 (English)In: AMIA Annual Symposium Proceedings, American Medical Informatics Association , 2016, Vol. 2016, p. 534-540Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Pandemic simulation is a useful tool for analyzing outbreaks and exploring the impact of variations in disease, population, and intervention models. Unfortunately, this type of simulation can be quite time-consuming especially for large models and significant outbreaks, which makes it difficult to run the simulations interactively and to use simulation for decision support during ongoing outbreaks. Improved run-time performance enables new applications of pandemic simulations, and can potentially allow decision makers to explore different scenarios and intervention effects. Parallelization of infection-probability calculations and multicore architectures can take advantage of modern processors to achieve significant run-time performance improvements. However, because of the varying computational load during each simulation run, which originates from the changing number of infectious persons during the outbreak, it is not useful to us the same multicore setup during the simulation run. The best performance can be achieved by dynamically changing the use of the available processor cores to balance the overhead of multithreading with the performance gains of parallelization.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Medical Informatics Association, 2016
Series
AMIA Annual Symposium Proceedings, ISSN 1559-4076, E-ISSN 1942-597X
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-137039 (URN)28269849 (PubMedID)
Conference
AMIA 2016 Annual Symposium November 12-16, 2016, Chicago,IL
Available from: 2017-05-02 Created: 2017-05-02 Last updated: 2018-04-07
Timpka, T., Eriksson, H., Holm, E., Strömgren, M., Ekberg, J., Spreco, A. & Dahlström, Ö. (2016). Relevance of workplace social mixing during influenza pandemics: an experimental modelling study of workplace cultures. Epidemiology and Infection, 144(10), 2031-2042
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relevance of workplace social mixing during influenza pandemics: an experimental modelling study of workplace cultures
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Epidemiology and Infection, ISSN 0950-2688, E-ISSN 1469-4409, Vol. 144, no 10, p. 2031-2042Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Workplaces are one of the most important regular meeting places in society. The aim of this study was to use simulation experiments to examine the impact of different workplace cultures on influenza dissemination during pandemics. The impact is investigated by experiments with defined social-mixing patterns at workplaces using semi-virtual models based on authentic sociodemographic and geographical data from a North European community (population 136 000). A simulated pandemic outbreak was found to affect 33% of the total population in the community with the reference academic-creative workplace culture; virus transmission at the workplace accounted for 10.6% of the cases. A model with a prevailing industrial-administrative workplace culture generated 11% lower incidence than the reference model, while the model with a self-employed workplace culture (also corresponding to a hypothetical scenario with all workplaces closed) produced 20% fewer cases. The model representing an academic-creative workplace culture with restricted workplace interaction generated 12% lower cumulative incidence compared to the reference model. The results display important theoretical associations between workplace social-mixing cultures and community-level incidence rates during influenza pandemics. Social interaction patterns at workplaces should be taken into consideration when analysing virus transmission patterns during influenza pandemics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS, 2016
Keywords
Epidemiology; infectious disease control; influenza; medical informatics (veterinary and medical); modelling
National Category
Probability Theory and Statistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130396 (URN)10.1017/S0950268816000169 (DOI)000379785600002 ()26847017 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency [2010-2788]; Swedish Science Council [2006-4433, 2008-5252]; Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovations (VINNOVA) [2011-03231]

Available from: 2016-08-15 Created: 2016-08-05 Last updated: 2018-04-07
Timpka, T., Spreco, A., Dahlström, Ö., Eriksson, O., Gursky, E., Ekberg, J., . . . Holm, E. (2014). Performance of eHealth data sources in local influenza surveillance: a 5-year open cohort study. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 16(4), e116
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Performance of eHealth data sources in local influenza surveillance: a 5-year open cohort study
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 16, no 4, p. e116-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: There is abundant global interest in using syndromic data from population-wide health information systems--referred to as eHealth resources--to improve infectious disease surveillance. Recently, the necessity for these systems to achieve two potentially conflicting requirements has been emphasized. First, they must be evidence-based; second, they must be adjusted for the diversity of populations, lifestyles, and environments.

OBJECTIVE: The primary objective was to examine correlations between data from Google Flu Trends (GFT), computer-supported telenursing centers, health service websites, and influenza case rates during seasonal and pandemic influenza outbreaks. The secondary objective was to investigate associations between eHealth data, media coverage, and the interaction between circulating influenza strain(s) and the age-related population immunity.

METHODS: An open cohort design was used for a five-year study in a Swedish county (population 427,000). Syndromic eHealth data were collected from GFT, telenursing call centers, and local health service website visits at page level. Data on mass media coverage of influenza was collected from the major regional newspaper. The performance of eHealth data in surveillance was measured by correlation effect size and time lag to clinically diagnosed influenza cases.

RESULTS: Local media coverage data and influenza case rates showed correlations with large effect sizes only for the influenza A (A) pH1N1 outbreak in 2009 (r=.74, 95% CI .42-.90; P<.001) and the severe seasonal A H3N2 outbreak in 2011-2012 (r=.79, 95% CI .42-.93; P=.001), with media coverage preceding case rates with one week. Correlations between GFT and influenza case data showed large effect sizes for all outbreaks, the largest being the seasonal A H3N2 outbreak in 2008-2009 (r=.96, 95% CI .88-.99; P<.001). The preceding time lag decreased from two weeks during the first outbreaks to one week from the 2009 A pH1N1 pandemic. Telenursing data and influenza case data showed correlations with large effect sizes for all outbreaks after the seasonal B and A H1 outbreak in 2007-2008, with a time lag decreasing from two weeks for the seasonal A H3N2 outbreak in 2008-2009 (r=.95, 95% CI .82-.98; P<.001) to none for the A p H1N1 outbreak in 2009 (r=.84, 95% CI .62-.94; P<.001). Large effect sizes were also observed between website visits and influenza case data.

CONCLUSIONS: Correlations between the eHealth data and influenza case rates in a Swedish county showed large effect sizes throughout a five-year period, while the time lag between signals in eHealth data and influenza rates changed. Further research is needed on analytic methods for adjusting eHealth surveillance systems to shifts in media coverage and to variations in age-group related immunity between virus strains. The results can be used to inform the development of alert-generating eHealth surveillance systems that can be subject for prospective evaluations in routine public health practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Journal of Medical Internet Research, 2014
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-106758 (URN)10.2196/jmir.3099 (DOI)000336501600017 ()24776527 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-05-21 Created: 2014-05-21 Last updated: 2018-04-07Bibliographically approved
Timpka, T., Spreco, A., Eriksson, O., Dahlström, Ö., Gursky, E. A., Stromgren, M., . . . Eriksson, H. (2014). Predictive performance of telenursing complaints in influenza surveillance: a prospective cohort study in Sweden. Eurosurveillance, 19(46), 24-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictive performance of telenursing complaints in influenza surveillance: a prospective cohort study in Sweden
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Eurosurveillance, ISSN 1025-496X, E-ISSN 1560-7917, Vol. 19, no 46, p. 24-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Syndromic data sources have been sought to improve the timely detection of increased influenza transmission. This study set out to examine the prospective performance of telenursing chief complaints in predicting influenza activity. Data from two influenza seasons (2007/08 and 2008/09) were collected in a Swedish county (population 427,000) to retrospectively determine which grouping of telenursing chief complaints had the largest correlation with influenza case rates. This grouping was prospectively evaluated in the three subsequent seasons. The best performing telenursing complaint grouping in the retrospective algorithm calibration was fever (child, adult) and syncope (r=0.66; pless than0.001). In the prospective evaluation, the performance of 14-day predictions was acceptable for the part of the evaluation period including the 2009 influenza pandemic (area under the curve (AUC)=0.84; positive predictive value (PPV)=0.58), while it was strong (AUC=0.89; PPV=0.93) for the remaining evaluation period including only influenza winter seasons. We recommend the use of telenursing complaints for predicting winter influenza seasons. The method requires adjustments when used during pandemics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
EUR CENTRE DIS PREVENTION and CONTROL, 2014
National Category
Basic Medicine Mathematics Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113057 (URN)000345424100004 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency [2010-2788]; Swedish Science Council [2008-5252]; Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovations (VINNOVA) [2011-03231]

Available from: 2015-01-09 Created: 2015-01-08 Last updated: 2018-04-07
Kovordanyi, R. & Eriksson, H. (2013). Advanced Decision Support in Simulator-Based Training for Crisis Management. In: : . Paper presented at National Symposium on Technology and Methodology for Security and Crisis Management, TAMSEC.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Advanced Decision Support in Simulator-Based Training for Crisis Management
2013 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper describes the development of a decision support and knowledge management system as part of an EU FP7 funded project, CRISIS. In its final form, the decision support and knowledge management system was implemented as an Android app that uses Esper for complex event processing. The reasoning engine of the decision support and knowledge management system is backed with an ontology and knowledge representation implemented in Topic Maps.

National Category
Computer Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117926 (URN)
Conference
National Symposium on Technology and Methodology for Security and Crisis Management, TAMSEC
Projects
CRISIS
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, FP7-242474
Available from: 2015-05-18 Created: 2015-05-18 Last updated: 2015-05-26Bibliographically approved
Timpka, T., Spreco, A., Dahlström, Ö., Eriksson, H., Gursky, E., Ekberg, J., . . . Holm, E. (2013). Performance of eHealth data sources in local influenza surveillance: a 5-year open cohort study using data from Google Flu Trends, telenursing call centres, health service provider web-pages, and mass media coverage. In: : . Paper presented at Eight Conference of Options for the Control of Influenza, Cape Town, South Africa, September 5-10, 2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Performance of eHealth data sources in local influenza surveillance: a 5-year open cohort study using data from Google Flu Trends, telenursing call centres, health service provider web-pages, and mass media coverage
Show others...
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105055 (URN)
Conference
Eight Conference of Options for the Control of Influenza, Cape Town, South Africa, September 5-10, 2013
Available from: 2014-03-06 Created: 2014-03-06 Last updated: 2018-04-07
Timpka, T., Gursky, E. A., Spreco, A., Eriksson, O., Dahlström, Ö., Strömgren, M., . . . Eriksson, H. (2013). Predictive value of telenursing complaints in influenza surveillance: a prospective cohort study in Sweden. Paper presented at 18th World Congress on Disaster and Emergency Medicine (WCDEM), 28-31 May 2013, Manchester, UK.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictive value of telenursing complaints in influenza surveillance: a prospective cohort study in Sweden
Show others...
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-91382 (URN)
Conference
18th World Congress on Disaster and Emergency Medicine (WCDEM), 28-31 May 2013, Manchester, UK
Available from: 2013-04-23 Created: 2013-04-23 Last updated: 2018-04-07
Timpka, T., Spreco, A., Dahlström, Ö., Eriksson, O., Gursky, E., Ekberg, J., . . . Holm, E. (2013). Predictive value of telenursing complaints in influenza surveillance: a prospective cohort study in Sweden. In: : . Paper presented at Eight Conference of Options for the Control of Influenza, Cape Town, South Africa, September 5-10, 2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictive value of telenursing complaints in influenza surveillance: a prospective cohort study in Sweden
Show others...
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105053 (URN)
Conference
Eight Conference of Options for the Control of Influenza, Cape Town, South Africa, September 5-10, 2013
Available from: 2014-03-06 Created: 2014-03-06 Last updated: 2018-04-07
Karlsson, D., Ekberg, J., Spreco, A., Eriksson, H. & Timpka, T. (2013). Visualization of infectious disease outbreaks in routine practice. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, 192, 697-701
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Visualization of infectious disease outbreaks in routine practice
Show others...
2013 (English)In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, ISSN 0926-9630, E-ISSN 1879-8365, Vol. 192, p. 697-701Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Throughout the history of epidemiology, visualizations have been used as the interface between public-health professionals and epidemiological data. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of the level of abstraction when using visualizations on routine infectious disease control. We developed three interactive visualization prototypes at increasing levels of abstraction to communicate subsets of influenza outbreak surveillance information. The visualizations were assessed through workshops in an exploratory evaluation with infectious disease epidemiologists. The results show that despite the potential of processed, abstract, and information-dense representations, increased levels of abstraction decreased epidemiologists understanding and confidence in visualizations. Highly abstract representations were deemed not applicable in routine practice without training. Infectious disease epidemiologists work routines and decision-making need to be further studied in order to develop visualizations that meet both the quality requirements imposed by policy-makers and the contextual nature of work practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
I O S Press, 2013
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-100786 (URN)10.3233/978-1-61499-289-9-697 (DOI)000341021700143 ()23920646 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-11-12 Created: 2013-11-12 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications