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Frisk, Jessica
Publications (10 of 13) Show all publications
Ginstman, C., Frisk, J., Ottosson, J. & Brynhildsen, J. (2015). Contraceptive Use Before and After Gastric Bypass: a Questionnaire Study. Obesity Surgery, 25(11), 2066-2070
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contraceptive Use Before and After Gastric Bypass: a Questionnaire Study
2015 (English)In: Obesity Surgery, ISSN 0960-8923, E-ISSN 1708-0428, Vol. 25, no 11, p. 2066-2070Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

At present, women are recommended to avoid pregnancy 12-18 months after bariatric surgery. Our aim in this study was to describe patterns of contraceptive use before and after gastric bypass in Sweden, and to describe the contraceptive counseling given preoperatively to women undergoing gastric bypass. In October 2012, a questionnaire was sent to 1000 Swedish women who all had undergone gastric bypass during 2010. The women had been included in the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Register at time of surgery. The main outcome measures were patterns of use of contraception before and after bariatric surgery. The response rate was 57 %. The most commonly used contraceptive methods were intrauterine devices, 29 % preoperatively and 26 % postoperatively even though there was a postoperative switch from the copper intrauterine device to the levonorgestrel intrauterine system. Thirty percent did not use any contraceptive during the first 12 months after surgery. Sixty percent of the responders were aware of the recommendations to avoid pregnancy after surgery. Many women who undergo bariatric surgery are not using any contraceptive method despite the recommendation that they should avoid pregnancy for at least 12 months. There is a great need to improve contraceptive counseling for this growing group of women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2015
Keywords
Gastric bypass; Pregnancy; Contraception; Obesity
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122518 (URN)10.1007/s11695-015-1641-7 (DOI)000362578700048 ()25744304 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Bayer AB, Sweden

Available from: 2015-11-09 Created: 2015-11-06 Last updated: 2019-05-02
Frisk, J., Hammar, M., Ingvar, M. & Spetz, A.-C. (2014). How long do the effects of acupuncture on hot flashes persist in cancer patients?. Supportive Care in Cancer, 22(5), 1409-1415
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How long do the effects of acupuncture on hot flashes persist in cancer patients?
2014 (English)In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 1409-1415Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose Acupuncture has been suggested as therapy for hot flashes in women with breast cancer and men with prostate cancer. In this systematic review, we sought to evaluate the long-term effects on vasomotor symptoms after the end of a defined treatment period of acupuncture in women with breast cancer and men with prostate cancer. Methods A literature search revealed 222 articles within the field. With defined exclusion criteria, we identified 17 studies. We also used the Jadad quality score and identified seven studies with a score of at least 3. Results Six of seven identified studies qualified for inclusion in an analysis that measured frequency of hot flashes weighted in relation to number of patients (n=172). The average reduction from baseline to end of acupuncture (ranging between 5 and 12 weeks of treatment) showed 43.2 % reduction of hot flashes. At the last follow-up (mean 5.8 months, range 39 months) after the end of therapy, the weighted reduction from baseline was sustained at 45.6 % in the 153 of 172 patients (89 %) who were followed up. Conclusions Data from six prospective analyzed studies indicate at least 3-month effects after the end of acupuncture treatment for flashes in women with breast cancer and men with prostate cancer. However, larger randomized trials with long-term follow-up will be needed to confirm these preliminary findings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Verlag (Germany), 2014
Keywords
Acupuncture; Breastneoplasm; Prostatic cancer; Hot flashes
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-107453 (URN)10.1007/s00520-014-2126-2 (DOI)000335774600030 ()
Available from: 2014-06-12 Created: 2014-06-12 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Spetz, A.-C., Frisk, J. & Hammar, M. (2012). Acupuncture as Treatment of Hot Flashes and the Possible Role of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide. Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2012(579321)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acupuncture as Treatment of Hot Flashes and the Possible Role of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide
2012 (English)In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1741-427X, E-ISSN 1741-4288, Vol. 2012, no 579321Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The mechanisms behind hot flashes in menopausal women are not fully understood. The flashes in women are probably preceded by and actually initiated by a sudden downward shift in the set point for the core body temperature in the thermoregulatory center that is affected by sex steroids, beta-endorphins, and other central neurotransmitters. Treatments that influence these factors may be expected to reduce hot flashes. Since therapy with sex steroids for hot flashes has appeared to cause a number of side effects and risks and women with hot flashes and breast cancer as well as men with prostate cancer and hot flashes are prevented from sex steroid therapy there is a great need for alternative therapies. Acupuncture affecting the opioid system has been suggested as an alternative treatment option for hot flashes in menopausal women and castrated men. The heat loss during hot flashes may be mediated by the potent vasodilator and sweat gland activator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) the concentration of which increases in plasma during flashes in menopausal women and, according to one study, in castrated men with flushes. There is also evidence for connections between the opioid system and the release of CGRP. In this paper we discuss acupuncture as a treatment alternative for hot flashes and the role of CGRP in this context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation / Oxford University Press (OUP): Policy B, 2012
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-74147 (URN)10.1155/2012/579321 (DOI)000298509100001 ()
Available from: 2012-01-20 Created: 2012-01-20 Last updated: 2017-12-08
Frisk, J., Källström, A.-C., Wall, N., Fredrikson, M. & Hammar, M. (2012). Acupuncture improves health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) and sleep in women with breast cancer and hot flushes. Supportive Care in Cancer, 20(4), 715-724
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acupuncture improves health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) and sleep in women with breast cancer and hot flushes
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2012 (English)In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 715-724Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: Evaluate effects of electro-acupuncture (EA) and hormone therapy (HT) on health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) and sleep in breast cancer survivors with vasomotor symptoms.

METHODS: Forty-five women, randomized to EA (n = 27) for 12 weeks or HT (n = 18) for 24 months, were followed for up to 2 years. Distress caused by, and numbers of, hot flushes, hours slept and times woken up/night, Psychological and General Well-being Index (PGWB) and Women's Health Questionnaire (WHQ) were registered before and during treatment and at 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months after start of treatment.

RESULTS: After 12 weeks of EA (n = 19), WHQ improved from 0.32 (IQR 0.23-0.53) at baseline to 0.24 (IQR 0.12-0.39; p < 0.001) and PGWB from 78 (IQR 53-89) to 79 (IQR 68-93; p = 0.002). All sleep parameters improved and Hot Flush Score (HFS) decreased by 80%. At 12 months, WHQ, PGWB and all sleep parameters remained significantly improved (n = 14) and HFS decreased by 65%. After 12 weeks of HT (n = 18), WHQ improved from 0.29 (IQR 0.15-0.44) at baseline to 0.15 (IQR 0.05-0.22; p = 0.001), PGWB from 75 (IQR 59-88) to 90 (62-97; p = 0.102) and three of five sleep parameters improved.

CONCLUSION: Both EA and HT increased HRQoL and sleep, probably through decreasing numbers of and distress by hot flushes. Although flushes decreased less in the EA group than in the HT group, HRQoL improved at least to the same extent maybe due to other effects of EA, not induced by HT, e.g. on anxiety, vitality and sleep, supported by subscale analyses. EA should be further evaluated as treatment for women with breast cancer and climacteric complaints, since HT no longer can be recommended for these women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2012
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-68804 (URN)10.1007/s00520-011-1134-8 (DOI)000301525700006 ()21468626 (PubMedID)
Note
funding agencies|Medical research council of South-East of Sweden||Swedish Medical Research Council| K2002-72X-12651-O5C |County Council of Ostergotland||Available from: 2011-06-07 Created: 2011-06-07 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Frisk, J. (2011). Acupuncture treatment for hot flushes in women with breast cancer and men with prostate cancer. (Doctoral dissertation). Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acupuncture treatment for hot flushes in women with breast cancer and men with prostate cancer
2011 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: The group of women and men with a history of cancer and distressing hot flushes and sweating is growing. The flushes negatively affect Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL), perhaps partially by disturbing sleep. Treatments that are effective, tolerable and safe need to be developed. There are a number of treatment alternatives that are often not very effective or associated with more or less serious side-effects. Based on theories on the mechanisms behind hot flushes and acupuncture, treatment with acupuncture has been tried in menopausal women with hot flushes and in a few studies in women with breast cancer (BCa).

Aim: The general aim of the research leading to this thesis was to evaluate the effect of acupuncture on hot flushes, HRQoL and sleep in men with prostate cancer (PCa) and women with BCa. To evaluate the effect in women with BCa of 12 weeks of electrostimulated acupuncture (EA) and two years of hormone therapy (HT) on number of, and distress caused by, hot flushes, and on HRQoL and sleep. To evaluate whether acupuncture therapy could be used to treat hot flushes in men with PCa treated with castration therapy, and then to evaluate in men with PCa and hot flushes the effect of 12 weeks of traditional acupuncture (TA) or EA on number of, and distress caused by, hot flushes and on urinary excretion of CGRP, HRQoL and sleep.

Subjects and methods: Forty-five women with a history of BCa were randomized to oral HT for two years or EA for 12 weeks and were followed up till two years after start of therapy. Thirty-eight men with PCa and hot flushes were treated with acupuncture. Seven men were treated with EA for 10 to 12 weeks in a pilot study. After positive results from this study 31 men were randomized between EA and TA for 12 weeks and followed up till nine months after end of treatment. Hot flushes, HRQoL and sleep were monitored by means of log books and validated questionnaires.

Results: The pilot study showed that 10 to 12 weeks of EA in men with PCa reduced number of hot flushes to below 50% of baseline with persistent effects at a follow up three months later. The two randomized studies showed that treatment with acupuncture in women with a history of BCa, and men with PCa was associated with a decrease in both the number of and distress caused by hot flushes by at least 50%. HT almost eliminated the hot flushes. There was no difference in reduction of hot flushes between men receiving EA or TA. Reduction of the number of hot flushes and distress caused by hot flushes probably leads to decreased disturbances at night, and was associated in women with a significant improvement in HRQoL and sleep variables. The improvement in HRQoL was as great in women treated with EA as in women receiving HT although the latter group had a more substantial reduction in number of flushes than the EA group suggesting that EA might have other effects in addition to those on hot flushes. In the men HRQoL did not change significantly. We saw very few and non-serious side-effects in the acupuncture groups and no signs that acupuncture activated the cancer or ovarian/testicular function.

Conclusions: Acupuncture reduced the number of hot flushes and distress caused by hot flushes with at least 50% in women and men with hot flushes and a cancer disease and also improved HRQoL and sleep at least in women. Acupuncture should be further evaluated in these patient groups and could be a treatment alternative in patients with troublesome symptoms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2011. p. 110
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1245
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-68806 (URN)978-91-7393-180-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2011-06-10, Berzeliussalen, Hälsouniversitetet, Campus US, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2011-06-07 Created: 2011-06-07 Last updated: 2011-06-07Bibliographically approved
Frisk, J. (2010). Managing hot flushes in men after prostate cancer-A systematic review. Maturitas, 65(1), 15-22
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managing hot flushes in men after prostate cancer-A systematic review
2010 (English)In: Maturitas, ISSN 0378-5122, E-ISSN 1873-4111, Vol. 65, no 1, p. 15-22Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Context and objective: The aim of this study was to describe hot flushes in men with prostate cancer, and their treatment methods. Method: A systematic review was conducted of the literature indexed between 1966 and 2009 on the MEDLINE, the ISI Web of Knowledge, Cinahl and PsycINFO. Of 252 articles identified, 32 were selected for consideration of their complete texts, of which five were subject to detailed analysis. Results: Diethylstilbestrol, megestrol acetate and cyproterone acetate have the strongest effect, giving a 75% or larger decrease of the number of hot flushes, but they may have severe or bothersome side-effects. Gabapentin has an uncertain effect. Clonidine is not proven effective for hot flushes. Long-term effects were not evaluated in any of the studies. SSRI/SNRI and acupuncture may have a moderate effect on hot flushes but are not proven in any RCTs. Conclusion: Hot flushes are common and bothersome symptoms in men with prostate cancer and those taking anti-androgen treatment, and reduce quality of life. Few treatments are available and some are avoided for these patients. Additional prospective treatment studies are needed, with long-term follow-up, in order to evaluate the effects and risks of treatments. Treatments with few or no severe side-effects should be prioritised in future investigations. Experimental studies are also needed to elucidate the mechanism behind hot flushes in men and to suggest routes for the development of new treatments.

Keywords
Prostate cancer, Androgen deprivation therapy, Vasomotor symptoms, Hot flushes, Treatment
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-53817 (URN)10.1016/j.maturitas.2009.10.017 (DOI)000273856900005 ()
Available from: 2010-02-05 Created: 2010-02-05 Last updated: 2017-12-12
Frisk, J., Källström, A.-C., Wall, N. & Hammar, M. (2009). Long term follow up of acupuncture and hormone therapy on hot flushes and well-being in women with breast cancer - a prospective, randomized multi centre trial in CANCER RESEARCH, vol 69, issue 2, pp 204S-204S. In: CANCER RESEARCH (pp. 204S-204S). , 69(2)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long term follow up of acupuncture and hormone therapy on hot flushes and well-being in women with breast cancer - a prospective, randomized multi centre trial in CANCER RESEARCH, vol 69, issue 2, pp 204S-204S
2009 (English)In: CANCER RESEARCH, 2009, Vol. 69, no 2, p. 204S-204SConference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

n/a

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-53926 (URN)000262583201028 ()
Available from: 2010-02-12 Created: 2010-02-12 Last updated: 2011-08-30
Frisk, J., Spetz, A.-C., Hjertberg, H., Petersson, B. & Hammar, M. (2009). Two Modes of Acupuncture as a Treatment for Hot Flushes in Men with Prostate Cancer—A Prospective Multicenter Study with Long-Term Follow-Up. European Urology, 55(1), 156-163
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Two Modes of Acupuncture as a Treatment for Hot Flushes in Men with Prostate Cancer—A Prospective Multicenter Study with Long-Term Follow-Up
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2009 (English)In: European Urology, ISSN 0302-2838, E-ISSN 1873-7560, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 156-163Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Hot flushes are common and distressing among men with castrational treatment for prostate cancer. Of the few treatments, most have side effects.

Objective: Assess changes in hot flushes of electrostimulated (EA) and traditional acupuncture (TA).

Design, Setting, and Participants: Thirty-one men with hot flushes due to prostate cancer treatment were recruited from three urological departments in Sweden, from 2001 to 2004.

Intervention: Thirty-one men were randomized to EA (4 electrostimulated needle points) or TA (12 needle points) weekly for 12 wk.

Measurements: Primary outcome: number of and distress from hot flushes in 24h and change in “hot flush score.” Secondary outcome: change in 24-h urine excretion of CGRP (calcitonin gene–related peptide).

Results and Limitations: Twenty-nine men completed the treatment. Hot flushes per 24h decreased significantly, from a median of 7.6 (interquartile range [IQR], 6.0–12.3) at baseline in the EA group to 4.1 (IQR, 2.0–6.5) (p=0.012) after 12 wk, and from 5.7 (IQR, 5.1–9.5) in the TA group to 3.4 (IQR1.8–6.3) (p=0.001). Distress by flushes decreased from 8.2 (IQR, 6.5–10.7) in the EA group to 3.3 (IQR, 0.3–8.1) (p=0.003), and from 7.6 (IQR, 4.7–8.3) to 3.4 (IQR, 2.0–5.6) (p=0.001) in the TA group after 12 wk, (78% and 73% reduction in “hot flush score,” respectively). The effect lasted up to 9 mo after treatment ended. CGRP did not change significantly. Few, minor side effects were reported.

Limitations: small number of patients; no placebo control, instead a small group controlled for 6 wk pretreatment.

Conclusions: EA and TA lowered number of and distress from hot flushes. The hot flush score decreased 78% and 73%, respectively, in line with or better than medical regimens for these symptoms. Acupuncture should be considered an alternative treatment for these symptoms, but further evaluation is needed, preferably with a non- or placebo-treated control group.

Keywords
Hot flushes, Prostate neoplasms, Acupuncture, Castration
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12621 (URN)10.1016/j.eururo.2008.02.002 (DOI)
Note
Original publication: Jessica Frisk, Anna-Clara Spetz, Hans Hjertberg, Bill Petersson, Mats Hammar, Two Modes of Acupuncture as a Treatment for Hot Flushes in Men with Prostate Cancer—A Prospective Multicenter Study with Long-Term Follow-Up, 2008, European Urology. Copyright: Elsevier B.V., http://www.elsevier.com/ Available from: 2008-09-18 Created: 2008-09-18 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Frisk, J., Carlhäll, S., Källström, A.-C., Lindh-Åstrand, L., Malmström, A. & Hammar, M. (2008). Long-term follow-up of acupuncture and hormone therapy on hot flushes in women with breast cancer: a prospective, randomized, controlled multicenter trial. Climacteric, 11(2), 166-174
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term follow-up of acupuncture and hormone therapy on hot flushes in women with breast cancer: a prospective, randomized, controlled multicenter trial
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2008 (English)In: Climacteric, ISSN 1369-7137, E-ISSN 1473-0804, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 166-174Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To evaluate the effects of electro-acupuncture (EA) and hormone therapy (HT) on vasomotor symptoms in women with a history of breast cancer.

Methods: Forty-five women were randomized to EA (n = 27) for 12 weeks or HT (n = 18) for 24 months. The number of and distress caused by hot flushes were registered daily before, during and up to 24 months after start of treatment.

Results: In 19 women who completed 12 weeks of EA, the median number of hot flushes/24 h decreased from 9.6 (interquartile range (IQR) 6.6-9.9) at baseline to 4.3 (IQR 1.0-7.1) at 12 weeks of treatment (p < 0.001). At 12 months after start of treatment, 14 women with only the initial 12 weeks of EA had a median number of flushes/24 h of 4.9 (IQR 1.8-7.3), and at 24 months seven women with no other treatment than EA had 2.1 (IQR 1.6-2.8) flushes/24 h. Another five women had a decreased number of flushes after having additional EA. The 18 women with HT had a baseline median number of flushes/24 h of 6.6 (IQR 4.0-8.9), and 0.0 (IQR 0.0-1.6; p = 0.001) at 12 weeks.

Conclusion: Electro-acupuncture is a possible treatment of vasomotor symptoms for women with breast cancer and should be further studied for this group of women.

Keywords
Acupuncture, Breast Neoplasms, Hot Flushes, Hormone Replacement Therapy, Menopause
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12622 (URN)10.1080/13697130801958709 (DOI)
Note

Original publication: J. Frisk, S. Carlhäll, A. -C. Källström, L. Lindh-Åstrand, A. Malmström and M. Hammar, Long-term follow-up of acupuncture and hormone therapy on hot flushes in women with breast cancer: a prospective, randomized, controlled multicenter trial, 2008, Climacteric, (11), 2, 166-174. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, an informa business

Available from: 2008-09-18 Created: 2008-09-18 Last updated: 2018-01-03Bibliographically approved
Sennfält, K., Carlsson, P., Thorfinn, J., Frisk, J., Henriksson, M. & Varenhorst, E. (2003). Technological changes in the management of prostate cancer result in increased healthcare costs: a retrospective study in a defined Swedish population. Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, 37(3), 226-231
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Technological changes in the management of prostate cancer result in increased healthcare costs: a retrospective study in a defined Swedish population
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2003 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, ISSN 0036-5599, E-ISSN 1651-2065, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 226-231Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE:

In two previous studies we calculated direct costs for men with prostate cancer who died in 1984-85 and 1992-93, respectively. We have now performed a third cost analysis to enable a longitudinal cost comparison. The aim was to calculate direct costs for the management of prostate cancer, describe the economic consequences of technological changes over time and estimate total direct costs for prostate cancer in Sweden.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

A total of 204 men in a defined population with a diagnosis of prostate cancer and who died in 1997-98 were included. Data on utilization of health services were extracted from clinical records from time of diagnosis to death from a university hospital and from one county hospital in the county of Ostergötland.

RESULTS:

The average direct cost per patient has been nearly stable over time (1984-85: 143 000 SEK; 1992-93: 150 000 SEK; 1997-98: 146 000 SEK). The share of costs for drugs increased from 7% in 1992-93 to 17% in 1997-98. The total direct costs for prostate cancer in Sweden have increased over time (1994-85: 610 MSEK; 1992-93: 860 MSEK; 1997-98: 970 MSEK).

CONCLUSIONS:

Two-thirds of the total cost is incurred by inpatient care. The share of the total costs for drugs is increasing due to increased use of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analogues. Small changes in average direct costs per patient despite greater use of technology are explained by the fact that more prostate cancers are detected at the early stages.

Keywords
Costs, Prostate cancer, Technological changes
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-46551 (URN)10.1080/00365590310008109 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
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