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Nordin, Conny
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Sjoberg, S., Eriksson, M., Werner, S., Bjellerup, P. & Nordin, C. (2011). L-thyroxine treatment in primary hypothyroidism does not increase the content of free triiodothyronine in cerebrospinal fluid: A pilot study. SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL and LABORATORY INVESTIGATION, 71(1), 63-67
Open this publication in new window or tab >>L-thyroxine treatment in primary hypothyroidism does not increase the content of free triiodothyronine in cerebrospinal fluid: A pilot study
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2011 (English)In: SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL and LABORATORY INVESTIGATION, ISSN 0036-5513, Vol. 71, no 1, p. 63-67Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The association between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum concentration of thyroid hormones and pituitary thyrotropin stimulating hormone (TSH) was studied in nine hypothyroid patients (HT) before and in seven after L-thyroxine treatment. With L-thyroxine, median free T4 increased 4-fold in serum (3.5 pmol/L vs 17.5 pmol/L) and 3-fold in CSF, (3.9pmol/L vs 11.5 pmol/L). Correspondingly, total T3 in serum increased two-fold (0.9 nmol/L vs 2.2 nmol/L). Unexpectedly, free T3 concentration in CSF was similar (1.5 pmol/L vs.1.5 pmol/L) before and during treatment. In HT, TSH in serum correlated with TSH in CSF as did free T4 in serum and in CSF. During L-thyroxine, the correlation with TSH in serum and CSF remained. Likewise, the free T4 concentration in serum correlated with that in CSF. However, no correlation was found between T3 in serum and free T3 in CSF. It seems evident that free T4 in serum equilibrates with that in the CSF both in the HT and during L-thyroxine. Despite a two-fold increase in total serum T3, free T3 in CSF remained unchanged, which agrees with previous results in rats showing that T3 is less exchangeable between serum and CSF. Alternatively, an accelerated conversion of T4 to T3 might have maintained the concentration of T3, due to strongly increased levels of TSH found in the hypothyroid state. The notion that free T4 in serum reflects the CSF concentration of free T4 is consistent with previous reports from studies in animals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2011
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-66117 (URN)10.3109/00365513.2010.541931 (DOI)000286825100009 ()
Available from: 2011-03-04 Created: 2011-03-04 Last updated: 2012-01-19Bibliographically approved
Nordin, C. & Sjödin, I. (2009). Increased CSF homocysteine in pathological gamblers compared with healthy controls. International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction, 7(1), 168-176
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increased CSF homocysteine in pathological gamblers compared with healthy controls
2009 (English)In: International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction, ISSN 1557-1874, E-ISSN 1557-1882, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 168-176Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Neurocognitive disturbances suggesting a frontal lobe dysfunction have been observed in pathological gamblers and alcohol dependents. Given that a high homocysteine level has been suggested to be a mediating factor in alcohol-related cognitive decline, we have determined homocysteine and cobalamine in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from 11 pathological male gamblers and 11 healthy male controls. Compared with healthy controls, pathological gamblers displayed higher CSF levels of homocysteine while the opposite was the case with CSF cobalamine. Smoking decreased the levels of homocysteine while the concentrations of cobalamine were increased. Homocysteine is a sulphur-containing amino acid exerting cytotoxic effects in living cells. The metabolism of homocysteine to methionine is mediated by cobalamine and folate. Human studies suggest that homocysteine plays a role in brain damage and cognitive and memory decline. The relationship between pathological gambling, homocysteine, cobalamine, folate (not determined in the study) and cognitive processing warrants further investigation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2009
Keywords
Cobalamine; CSF; Homocysteine; Pathological gambling
National Category
Substance Abuse
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-18856 (URN)10.1007/s11469-008-9172-2 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-06-05 Created: 2009-06-05 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Samuelsson, M., Dahl, M.-L., Gupta, R. & Nordin, C. (2009). Taurine in plasma and CSF: a study in healthy male volunteers. Amino Acids, 36(3), 529-533
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Taurine in plasma and CSF: a study in healthy male volunteers
2009 (English)In: Amino Acids, ISSN 0939-4451, E-ISSN 1438-2199, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 529-533Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In order to explore the interrelationship between plasma and cerebrospinal fluid taurine concentrations, three consecutive 6-ml fractions of cerebrospinal fluid were drawn from 30 healthy male volunteers in the early morning after 8 h in the fasting condition. Repeated plasma samples were drawn over 24 h the day before lumbar puncture. Taurine in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid was determined by high performance liquid chromatography. The subjects were categorized as extensive or poor metabolizers with respect to the cytochrome P450 2D6 genotype. The taurine cerebrospinal fluid/plasma ratio at 8 a.m. was negatively influenced by the plasma taurine concentration at 4 p.m. the previous day. It was also negatively influenced by body mass index and positively by the intraspinal pressure. Three poor metabolizers of cytochrome P450 2D6 had higher plasma taurine areas under the curve than 27 extensive metabolizers. Hypothetically, cytochrome P450 2D6 influences the transport of taurine across the blood-brain barrier.

Keywords
Taurine, Cerebrospinal fluid, Plasma, Cytochrome P450 2D6, Genotype
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17389 (URN)10.1007/s00726-008-0115-9 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-03-21 Created: 2009-03-21 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Atlas, A., Gisslen, M., Nordin, C., Lindstrom, L. & Schwieler, L. (2007). Acute psychotic symptoms in HIV-1 infected patients are associated with increased levels of kynurenic acid in cerebrospinal fluid. Brain, behavior, and immunity, 21(1), 86-91
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute psychotic symptoms in HIV-1 infected patients are associated with increased levels of kynurenic acid in cerebrospinal fluid
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2007 (English)In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 86-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is associated with psychiatric complications including cognitive impairment, affective disorders, and psychosis. Previous studies have revealed a disturbed kynurenine metabolism in these patients leading to increased levels of neuroactive compounds acting at glutamatergic neurotransmission. Kynurenic acid (KYNA), one of these metabolites is a glutamate-receptor antagonist, preferentially blocking the glycine site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NNIDA) receptor. Increased levels of brain KYNA have been suggested to induce a NNIDA receptor hypofunction that is associated with psychotic symptoms. In the present study, we analyze the concentration of KYNA in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from HIV-1 infected patients (n = 22), including HIV-1 infected patients with psychotic symptoms (n = 8) and HIV-1 infected patients without psychiatric symptoms (n = 14). We found that HIV-1 infected patients had significantly higher median concentration of CSF KYNA (3.02 nM) compared to healthy controls (1.17 nM). Furthermore, CSF KYNA levels were significantly elevated in HIV-1 infected patients with psychotic symptoms (4.54 nM) compared to patients with HIV-1 without psychiatric symptoms (2.28 nNI). Present results indicate that increased levels of CSF KYNA may be associated with development of psychotic symptoms in HIV-1 infected patients. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Keywords
kynurenic acid, cerebrospinal fluid, HIV-1 infection, psychos, schizophrenia
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-45970 (URN)10.1016/j.bbi.2006.02.005 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Nordin, C., Gupta, R. & Sjödin, I. (2007). Cerebrospinal fluid amino acids in pathological gamblers and healthy controls. Neuropsychobiology, 56( 2-3), 152-158
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cerebrospinal fluid amino acids in pathological gamblers and healthy controls
2007 (English)In: Neuropsychobiology, ISSN 0302-282X, E-ISSN 1423-0224, Vol. 56, no 2-3, p. 152-158Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Amino acids, such as valine, isoleucine and leucine compete with tyrosine and tryptophan for transport into the brain and might thus affect the central serotonin and catecholamine patterns. Furthermore, the excitatory amino acids glutamic acid, aspartic acid and glycine are known to act on the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, which is part of the reward system. Based on these facts, we have explored the role of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amino acids in pathological gambling. Concentrations of amino acids were determined in CSF obtained from one female and 11 pathological male gamblers and 11 healthy male controls. In an ANCOVA with best subset regression, pathological male gamblers had higher CSF levels of the excitatory glutamic and aspartic acids, as well as of phenylalanine, isoleucine, citrulline and glycine. A negative contribution of glycine in interaction with the neuraxis distance might mirror a reduced spinal supply or an altered elimination of glycine in pathological gamblers. A decreasing CSF gradient from the first (0-6 ml) to the third (13-18 ml) CSF fraction was found for glutamic acid, glycine, leucine, isoleucine, lysine, ornithine and glutamine in both pathological gamblers and healthy controls. A decreasing gradient was found, however, for aspartic acid and phenylalanine in pathological male gamblers. The altered pattern of CSF amino acids in pathological gamblers might exert an influence on central monoamines as well as on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function. Copyright © 2008 S. Karger AG.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-41713 (URN)10.1159/000115782 (DOI)58820 (Local ID)58820 (Archive number)58820 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Nilsson, L. K., Nordin, C., Jönsson, E. G., Engberg, G., Linderholm, K. R. & Erhardt, S. (2007). Cerebrospinal fluid kynurenic acid in male and female controls - Correlation with monoamine metabolites and influences of confounding factors. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 41( 1-2), 144-151
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cerebrospinal fluid kynurenic acid in male and female controls - Correlation with monoamine metabolites and influences of confounding factors
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2007 (English)In: Journal of Psychiatric Research, ISSN 0022-3956, E-ISSN 1879-1379, Vol. 41, no 1-2, p. 144-151Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The concentrations of the tryptophan metabolite kynurenic acid (KYNA) and the monoamine metabolites homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylglycol (HMPG) were determined in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 43 healthy volunteers (30 males and 13 females). Healthy female controls displayed higher CSF concentration of KYNA (1.91 nM ± 0.20) compared to healthy male controls (1.06 nM ± 0.07) and lower CSF levels of HMPG (39.2 nM ± 2.0 and 43.4 ± 1.2, respectively). CSF levels of HVA and 5-HIAA did not differ between females (181.3 nM ± 21.9 and 93.7 nM ± 11.4, respectively) and males (138.9 nM ± 12.6 and 74.8 nM ± 5.9, respectively). Positive intercorrelations were found between CSF KYNA, HVA and 5-HIAA while CSF content of HMPG did not correlate with KYNA or the other monoamine metabolites in CSF. A negative correlation was found between back length and CSF concentrations of KYNA, HVA and 5-HIAA and also between CSF KYNA levels and body height. The results of the present study suggest that concentrations of KYNA and the monoamine metabolites in CSF from healthy controls are dependent on gender and back length, which must be taken in consideration when analysing mixed groups of men and women. The higher KYNA concentration found in female controls compared to male might be attributed to a shorter back in women compared to men. Furthermore, these findings suggest that increased KYNA formation is associated with an increased dopamine and serotonin turnover. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Homovanillic acid; 5-Hydroxy-indoleacetic acid; 4-Hydroxy-3methoxyphenylglycol; Human; Cerebrospinal fluid
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-36138 (URN)10.1016/j.jpsychires.2005.12.001 (DOI)30085 (Local ID)30085 (Archive number)30085 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Nilsson-Todd, L. K., Nordin, C., Jönsson, E. G., Skogh, E. & Erhardt, S. (2007). Cerebrospinal fluid kynurenic acid in male patients with schizophrenia - Correlation with monoamine metabolites. Acta Neuropsychiatrica, 19(1), 45-52
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cerebrospinal fluid kynurenic acid in male patients with schizophrenia - Correlation with monoamine metabolites
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2007 (English)In: Acta Neuropsychiatrica, ISSN 0924-2708, E-ISSN 1601-5215, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 45-52Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The tryptophan metabolite kynurenic acid (KYNA) is an endogenous glutamate/nicotinic receptor antagonist. Previous studies have shown that the concentration of the compound is increased in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with schizophrenia. Furthermore, it has been found that the CSF concentration of KYNA is positively correlated to CSF concentrations of the monoamine metabolites homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxy indoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in healthy control subjects. Objectives: To study the correlations between KYNA and the monoamine metabolites HVA, 5-HIAA and 4-hydroxy-3- methoxyphenylglycol (HMPG) in CSF of male patients (n = 53, ranging from 20 to 48 years of age) with verified schizophrenia. Methods: CSF was obtained by lumbar puncture, and KYNA analysis was performed with an isocratic reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography system connected to a fluorescence detector. HVA, 5-HIAA and HMPG concentrations were measured by mass fragmentography with deuterium-labelled internal standards. Results: Positive intercorrelations were found between CSF KYNA, HVA and 5-HIAA, while CSF content of HMPG did not correlate to KYNA or any of the monoamine metabolites in CSF. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that increased KYNA formation is associated with an increased dopamine and serotonin turnover in male patients with schizophrenia. © 2007 Blackwell Munksgaard.

Keywords
Homovanillic acid (HVA); 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid (5-HIAA); 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylglycol (HMPG), human
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-39546 (URN)10.1111/j.1601-5215.2006.00170.x (DOI)49628 (Local ID)49628 (Archive number)49628 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Nordin, C. & Sjödin, I. (2007). CSF cholecystokinin, γ-aminobutyric acid and neuropeptide Y in pathological gamblers and healthy controls. Journal of neural transmission, 114(4), 499-503
Open this publication in new window or tab >>CSF cholecystokinin, γ-aminobutyric acid and neuropeptide Y in pathological gamblers and healthy controls
2007 (English)In: Journal of neural transmission, ISSN 0300-9564, E-ISSN 1435-1463, Vol. 114, no 4, p. 499-503Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The sulphated cholecystokinin (CCK) octapeptide (CCK-8S), the CCK tetrapeptide (CCK-4), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were determined in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from 11 pathological male gamblers and 11 healthy male controls. Compared with healthy controls, pathological male gamblers displayed higher concentrations of CCK-8S, CCK-4 and GABA (but not NPY). A gradient with decreasing concentrations from the first to the third 6-ml CSF fraction was found for CCK-8S, CCK-4 and NPY, but only in pathological gamblers. Disrupted gradients were found for GABA and for NPY in healthy controls. Given that CCK is a modulator of dopamine in the reward process, the increase in CCK-8S and CCK-4 is not unexpected. The high level of GABA in pathological gamblers is in conformity with a compensatory inhibitory action on noradrenergic neurons. The CSF gradient of CCK-8S and CCK-4 in pathological male gamblers (but not healthy controls) might indicate a difference in diurnal variation. The results obtained are in line with an altered CCK and GABA function in pathological gambling. © 2006 Springer-Verlag.

Keywords
Pathological gambling, CSF, cholecystokinin, NPY, GABA
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-37782 (URN)10.1007/s00702-006-0593-4 (DOI)38545 (Local ID)38545 (Archive number)38545 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Lundberg, K., Josefsson, A. & Nordin, C. (2007). Diurnal and seasonal variation of cholecystokinin peptides in humans. Neuropeptides, 41(1), 59-63
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diurnal and seasonal variation of cholecystokinin peptides in humans
2007 (English)In: Neuropeptides, ISSN 0143-4179, E-ISSN 1532-2785, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 59-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cholecystokinin (CCK) was determined in plasma obtained from 10 female (aged 23.4 ± SD 2.3 years) and nine male (aged 22.0 ± SD 1.4 years) healthy volunteers. Blood samples were drawn three times (8.00 a.m., 12 noon and 8.00 a.m.) on each of two sessions, one in the winter (November-December) and one in the summer (April-July). The participants had fasted (and were nicotine-free) since midnight preceding the sampling. A standardized breakfast was served after the first sampling. CCK was determined by radioimmunoassay. The area under the curve 0-24 h (AUC)CCK Winter was lower than AUCCCK Summer (F1:17 = 4.73, P = 0.0440) in the whole group of volunteers. On comparing the CCK concentrations within each session, there was an overall difference in winter (F2:36 = 14.81, P < 0.0001) as well in summer (F2:36 = 18.39, P < 0.0001). Post hoc comparisons yielded a difference between the 8.00 a.m. and 12 noon concentrations on the first day in winter (t = -3.96, P = 0.0009) as well as in summer (t = -4.64, P = 0.0002). The difference between the summer and winter AUCsCCK correlated with the difference between AUCs for temperatures in summer and winter (r = 0.58, P = 0.0089). The correlation was accounted for by the females (r = 0.73, P = 0.0171). The results are in accord with a diurnal and a seasonal variation of CCK in human plasma. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-39205 (URN)10.1016/j.npep.2006.09.049 (DOI)47233 (Local ID)47233 (Archive number)47233 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2019-06-28
Bång, M., Timpka, T., Eriksson, H., Holm, E. & Nordin, C. (2007). Mobile phone computing for in-situ cognitive-behavioral therapy. In: MedINFO 2007,2007: . Paper presented at 12th World Congress on Health (Medical) Informatics (pp. 1078-1082). IOS Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mobile phone computing for in-situ cognitive-behavioral therapy
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2007 (English)In: MedINFO 2007,2007, IOS Press, 2007, p. 1078-1082Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for psychological disorders is becoming increasingly popular on the Internet. However when using this workstation approach, components such as training and learning relaxation skills, problem solving, exposure exercises, and sleep management guidance must be done in the domestic environment. This paper describes design concepts for providing spatially explicit CBT with mobile phones. We reviewed and analyzed a set of treatment manuals to distinguish elements of CBT that can be improved and supported using mobile phone applications. The key advantage of mobile computing support in CBT is that multimedia can be applied to record, scale, and label anxiety-provoking situations where the need arises, which helps the CBT clients formulate and convey their thoughts and feelings to relatives and friends, as well as to therapists at subsequent treatment sessions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOS Press, 2007
Series
Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, ISSN 0926-9630
National Category
Computer Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-40333 (URN)53013 (Local ID)978-1-58603-774-1 (ISBN)53013 (Archive number)53013 (OAI)
Conference
12th World Congress on Health (Medical) Informatics
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2018-01-13
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