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Axelson, Olav
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 44) Show all publications
Axelson, O., Forastiere, F. & Fredrikson, M. (2007). Assessing dose-response relationships by cumulative exposures in epidemiological studies. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 50(3), 217-220
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing dose-response relationships by cumulative exposures in epidemiological studies
2007 (English)In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 217-220Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: If the occurrence of disease monotonically increases with the degree of exposure in an epidemiologic study, a dose-response (or exposure-response) relationship is indicated and facilitates the interpretation that the exposure has a causal role. It is not uncommon, however, that there is some effect in terms of an overall increased relative risk but no clear dose-response relationship. Methods: Models presented here show that cumulative exposure, as involving the duration of exposure, is not an adequate parameter when more recent exposure or the intensity of the exposure plays the greater role for the disease outcome. Conclusions: In lack of a dose-response pattern by cumulative exposure, the interpretation of an overall increased risk might well be that there is no definite effect. The proper consideration should be, however, that the measure of exposure could be inadequate, suggesting a need for further analyses and evaluations of the material studied. © 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-39215 (URN)10.1002/ajim.20377 (DOI)47328 (Local ID)47328 (Archive number)47328 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Wingren, G. & Axelson, O. (2007). Cancer incidence and mortality in a Swedish rubber tire manufacturing plant. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 50(12), 901-909
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cancer incidence and mortality in a Swedish rubber tire manufacturing plant
2007 (English)In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 901-909Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A classification of 12 work categories was used to evaluate the cancer incidence and mortality among a cohort of Swedish rubber tire workers. Methods: Cancer incidence and mortality in the cohort was compared with expected values from national rates. Standardized incidence and mortality ratios were calculated for the total cohort, for sub-cohorts and with the inclusion of a latency requirement. Results: Among men, increased incidence and mortality risks were found for cancer in the larynx, SIR = 2.10, 95% confidence intervals (95% CI): 1.05-3.76, SMR = 2.08, 95% CI: 0.42-6.09. Increased risks were also seen for cancer in the trachea, bronchus, and lung, SIR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.28-2.02, SMR = 1.54, 95% CI: 1.21-1.94, the incidence risk was highest among those with the longest exposure duration and among workers in compounding/mixing, milling, and maintenance. Decreased incidence risks were seen for cancer of the prostate (SIR = 0.74, 95% CI: 059-0.92) and skin (SIR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.36-0.84). Conclusions: The finding of an excess of tumors in the respiratory system is in agreement with earlier findings in other studies on rubber tire workers. The results on other cancer types are compared to earlier findings and related to work processes and chemical exposures of possible causal importance. © 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-39548 (URN)10.1002/ajim.20536 (DOI)49667 (Local ID)49667 (Archive number)49667 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Persson, B., Magnusson, A., Westberg, H., Andersson, E., Torén, K., Wingren, G. & Axelson, O. (2007). Cardiovascular mortality among Swedish pulp and paper mill workers. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 50(3), 221-226
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cardiovascular mortality among Swedish pulp and paper mill workers
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2007 (English)In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 221-226Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Malignant diseases but also cardiovascular and respiratory disorders and diabetes mellitus have been associated with work in pulp and paper production. The present cohort focuses on cardiovascular mortality in relation to various exposures in this industry. Methods: The cohort, followed-up for mortality, includes 7,107 workers, 6,350 men and 757 women, from three major old mills in the middle of Sweden. Results: Instead of a healthy-worker effect, a slightly increased risk for death in diseases of the circulatory system was found for male workers. Notably, work with sulfate digestion, steam and power generation and maintenance was associated with significantly increased risks. Cerebrovascular diseases showed non-significantly increased risks for maintenance and paper and paperboard production and manufacture. Conclusions: The differences in risk among various parts of the production are striking although it is hard to pinpoint any specific exposures. Dust and small particles along with sulfur compounds might be suspected. © 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-39217 (URN)10.1002/ajim.20449 (DOI)47346 (Local ID)47346 (Archive number)47346 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Landtblom, A.-M., Tondel, M., Hjalmarsson, P., Flodin, U. & Axelson, O. (2006). The risk for multiple sclerosis in female nurse anaesthetists: A register based study. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 63(6), 387-389
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The risk for multiple sclerosis in female nurse anaesthetists: A register based study
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2006 (English)In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 63, no 6, p. 387-389Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Previous studies have suggested that exposure to organic solvents, including volatile anaesthetic agents, may be a risk factor for multiple sclerosis (MS), possibly in combination with genetic and other environmental factors. Aims: To further investigate the role of volatile anaesthetic agents having similar acute toxic effects to other organic solvents. Methods: Female nurse anaesthetists, other female nurses, and female teachers from middle and upper compulsory school levels were identified and retrieved from the 1985 census, Statistics Sweden. By means of the unique personal identity number in Sweden, these individuals were linked with the disability pension registers at The National Social Insurance Board and also with data on hospital care 1985-2000 at The National Board of Health and Welfare. Results: The cumulative incidence rate ratio of MS was found to be increased in female nurse anaesthetists in relation to other nurses (statistically not significant) and teachers (statistically significant), respectively. Conclusions: These findings give some support to previous findings of an increased risk for MS in nurse anaesthetists. This is interesting in the context of previous observations of organic solvents in general as a potential risk factor in MS.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-34807 (URN)10.1136/oem.2005.024604 (DOI)23305 (Local ID)23305 (Archive number)23305 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Westberg, H. B., Hardell, L. O., Malmqvist, N., Ohlson, C.-G. & Axelson, O. (2005). On the use of different measures of exposure - experiences from a case-control study on testicular cancer and PVC exposure.. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, 2(7), 351-356
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the use of different measures of exposure - experiences from a case-control study on testicular cancer and PVC exposure.
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2005 (English)In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, ISSN 1545-9624, E-ISSN 1545-9632, Vol. 2, no 7, p. 351-356Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Associations between exposure to PVC plastics and testicular cancer have been reported. To improve the exposure-response analysis in a matched case-control study on testicular cancer and occupational exposures, a self-administered exposure questionnaire and expert assessment was applied and different exposure measures were developed. The questionnaires regarding work histories and employment in PVC production, manufacturing, and handling of PVC products were completed by 1582 subjects (90%). By expert assessment, 360 subjects were considered exposed, and the exposure intensity to PVC plastics for different working periods was determined. Different exposure measures to PVC plastics were then developed, such as ever/never exposed, duration, maximum intensity, median intensity, and cumulative median intensity. The correlation between the different measures of exposure was high for exposure duration and the cumulative median exposure intensity (Spearman rank coefficient rs = 0.94), as was the correlation between the maximum intensity and the median intensity (rs = 0.94). The agreement between the answers in the questionnaire and the expert assessments was moderate, Kappa value 0.56. The odds ratio for “ever” exposed based on the exposure as reported in the questionnaire was 1.1 (95%, CI 0.82-1.56), and as determined by expert assessment 1.3 (CI 1.05-1.69). The odds ratios for all four different categories of exposure measures varied between 0.86 and 2.6 but decreased by increasing exposure. An overall excess of testicular cancer for the PVC exposed vs. the unexposed was not supported by the pattern seen in a standard exposure-response analysis based on several exposure measures. The findings stress the importance of using several exposure measures as dose surrogates when the underlying toxic mechanisms are unknown and when there are indications of an overall effect.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-31222 (URN)10.1080/15459620590969046 (DOI)16972 (Local ID)16972 (Archive number)16972 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Medin, J., Nordlund, A., Eklund, J., Ekberg, K. & Axelsson, O. (2005). Organisational change, job strain, effort reward and increased risk of stroke: a case control study.. In: Second ICOH International Conference on Psychosocial factors at Work.,2005.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organisational change, job strain, effort reward and increased risk of stroke: a case control study.
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2005 (English)In: Second ICOH International Conference on Psychosocial factors at Work.,2005, 2005Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-29341 (URN)14663 (Local ID)14663 (Archive number)14663 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2018-10-08
Bochicchio, F., Forastiere, F., Farchi, S., Quarto, M. & Axelson, O. (2005). Residential radon exposure, diet and lung cancer: A case-control study in a Mediterranean region. International Journal of Cancer, 114(6), 983-991
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Residential radon exposure, diet and lung cancer: A case-control study in a Mediterranean region
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2005 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 114, no 6, p. 983-991Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We performed a case-control study in Lazio, a region in central Italy characterized by high levels of indoor radon, Mediterranean climate and diet. Cases (384) and controls (404) aged 35-90 years were recruited in the hospital. Detailed information regarding smoking, diet and other risk factors were collected by direct interview. Residential history during the 30-year period ending 5 years before enrolment was ascertained. In each dwelling, radon detectors were placed in both the main bedroom and the living room for 2 consecutive 6-month periods. We computed odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for time-weighted radon concentrations using both categorical and continuous unconditional logistic regression analysis and adjusting for smoking, diet and other variables. Radon measurements were available from 89% and 91% of the time period for cases and controls, respectively. The adjusted ORs were 1.30 (1.03-1.64), 1.48 (1.08-2.02), 1.49 (0.82-2.71) and 2.89 (0.45-18.6) for 50-99, 100-199, 200-399 and 400+ Bq/m3, respectively, compared with 0-49 Bq/m3 (OR = 1, 0.56-1.79). The excess odds ratio (EOR) per 100 Bq/m3 was 0.14 (-0.11, 0.46) for all subjects, 0.24 (-0.09, 0.70) for subjects with complete radon measurements and 0.30 (-0.08, 0.82) for subjects who had lived in 1 or 2 dwellings. There was a tendency of higher risk estimates among subjects with low-medium consumption of dietary antioxidants (EOR = 0.32, -0.19, 1.16) and for adenocarcinoma, small cell and epidermoid cancers. This study indicates an association, although generally not statistically significant, between residential radon and lung cancer with both categorical and continuous analyses. Subjects with presumably lower uncertainty in the exposure assessment showed a higher risk. Dietary antioxidants may act as an effect modifier. © 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-31068 (URN)10.1002/ijc.20799 (DOI)16790 (Local ID)16790 (Archive number)16790 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Axelson, O. (2004). Ethylene oxide and cancer. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 61
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethylene oxide and cancer
2004 (English)In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 61Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-22018 (URN)1046 (Local ID)1046 (Archive number)1046 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Semple, S., Dick, F., Cherrie, J., Study Group, G., Axelson, O., Hällsten, A.-L. & Tondel, M. (2004). Exposure assessment for a population-based case-control study combining a job-exposure matrix with interview data.. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 30(3), 241-248
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exposure assessment for a population-based case-control study combining a job-exposure matrix with interview data.
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2004 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 241-248Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-22016 (URN)1044 (Local ID)1044 (Archive number)1044 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Tondel, M., Hjalmarsson, P., Hardell, L., Carlsson, G. & Axelson, O. (2004). Increase of regional total cancer incidence in north Sweden due to the Chernobyl accident?. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 58(12), 1011-1016
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increase of regional total cancer incidence in north Sweden due to the Chernobyl accident?
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2004 (English)In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 58, no 12, p. 1011-1016Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Study objective: Is there any epidemiologically visible influence on the cancer incidence after the Chernobyl fallout in Sweden?

Design: A cohort study was focused on the fallout of caesium-137 in relation to cancer incidence 1988–1996.

Setting: In northern Sweden, affected by the Chernobyl accident in 1986, 450 parishes were categorised by caesium-137 deposition: <3 (reference), 3–29, 30–39, 40–59, 60–79, and 80–120 kiloBecquerel/m2.

Participants: All people 0–60 years living in these parishes in 1986 to 1987 were identified and enrolled in a cohort of 1 143 182 persons. In the follow up 22 409 incident cancer cases were retrieved in 1988–1996. A further analysis focused on the secular trend.

Main results: Taking age and population density as confounding factors, and lung cancer incidence in 1988–1996 and total cancer incidence in 1986–1987 by municipality as proxy confounders for smoking and time trends, respectively, the adjusted relative risks for the deposition categories were 1.00 (reference <3 kiloBecquerel/m2), 1.05, 1.03, 1.08, 1.10, and 1.21. The excess relative risk was 0.11 per 100 kiloBecquerel/m2 (95% CI 0.03 to 0.20). Considering the secular trend, directly age standardised cancer incidence rate differences per 100 000 person years between 1988 to 1996 and the reference period 1986–1987, were 30.3 (indicating a time trend in the reference category), 36.8, 42.0, 45.8, 50.1, and 56.4. No clear excess occurred for leukaemia or thyroid cancer.

Conclusions: Unless attributable to chance or remaining uncontrolled confounding, a slight exposure related increase in total cancer incidence has occurred in northern Sweden after the Chernobyl accident.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: BMJ Publishing Group, 2004
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-31070 (URN)10.1136/jech.2003.017988 (DOI)000226898000010 ()16792 (Local ID)16792 (Archive number)16792 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
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