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Lundberg, J., Westin, C.-F., Arvola, M., Holmlid, S. & Josefsson, B. (2018). Cognitive work analysis and conceptual designing for unmanned air traffic management in cities. In: : . Paper presented at Proceedings of the 36th European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics (ECCE'19), Utrecht, Netherlands, September 5-7, 2018 (pp. 1-4). New York: ACM Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive work analysis and conceptual designing for unmanned air traffic management in cities
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2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Cognitive Work Analysis (CWA) is an appropriate approach in high-stakes domains, such as Air Traffic Management (ATM). It provides focus on human expert performance in regular as well as contingency situations. However, CWA is not suitable for the design of a first-of-a-kind system, since there is nothing to analyze before the start of the design process. In 2017, unmanned traffic management (UTM) for intense drone traffic in cities was such a system. Making things worse, the UTM system has to be in place before the traffic, since it provides basic safety. In this paper we present conceptual designing as a bootstrapping approach to CWA for UTM as a first-of-a-kind system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: ACM Press, 2018
Keywords
cognitive work analysis, conceptual designing, work domain analysis, unmanned aircraft traffic management
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-157104 (URN)10.1145/3232078.3232082 (DOI)2-s2.0-85055319921 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-6449-2 (ISBN)
Conference
Proceedings of the 36th European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics (ECCE'19), Utrecht, Netherlands, September 5-7, 2018
Projects
UTM50
Available from: 2019-05-28 Created: 2019-05-28 Last updated: 2019-06-13Bibliographically approved
Arvola, M. & Linder, J. (2018). Know thy users by interpretative phenomenological analysis. Journal of Interaction Science, 6(3)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Know thy users by interpretative phenomenological analysis
2018 (English)In: Journal of Interaction Science, E-ISSN 2194-0827, Vol. 6, no 3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

One approach to getting to know a user and understanding the user experience (UX) is phenomenology. Currently, there is a lack of clearly defined methods for phenomenological analysis of user experience in design projects. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) is an approach developed in psychology, and in this article, it is adapted to the case of a pro bono design project at a UX design agency supporting a disadvantaged group of people, newly arrived immigrants to Sweden. The design project involved research on how the immigrants experienced a service that introduced them to the job market. The adapted method, UX IPA, contributed to the pro bono project with a focus on both experience and meaning, which is important in design projects that relate to major events in users’ lives. The method was considered less appropriate in UX projects for specific products with highly instrumental use. The method can, in many cases, be too costly. However, costs can possibly be reduced by top-down approaches. In commercial UX projects, the method may be appropriate for the fuzzy front-end of design and innovation, but clients may be unimpressed by the small sample size. This can potentially be alleviated by mixed-methods approaches.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Germany: Journal of Interaction Science, 2018
Keywords
user experience, interaction design, user-centred design, interpretative phenomenological analysis, user research methods
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155632 (URN)10.24982/jois.1719018.003 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-03-21 Created: 2019-03-21 Last updated: 2019-03-28Bibliographically approved
Ziemke, T., Arvola, M., Dahlbäck, N. & Billing, E. (Eds.). (2018). Proceedings of the 14th SweCog Conference: Linköping 2018, 11-12 October. Paper presented at Swecog 2018, the 14th Swecog conference, Linköping, Sweden, October 11-12, 2018. Skövde: University of Skövde
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Proceedings of the 14th SweCog Conference: Linköping 2018, 11-12 October
2018 (English)Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Welcome to SweCog 2018 in Linköping!

This booklet contains the program and short papers for oral and poster presentations at SweCog 2018, this year’s edition of the annual conference of the Swedish Cognitive Science Society. Following the SweCog tradition and its aim to support networking among researchers in cognitive science and related areas, contributions cover a wide spectrum of research.

A trend in recent years, also reflected in this year’s conference program, is an increasing number of contributions that deal with different types of autonomous technologies, such as social robots, virtual agents or automated vehicles, and in particular people’s interaction with such systems. This clearly is a growing research area of high societal relevance, where cognitive science - with its interdisciplinary and human-centered approach - can make significant contributions.

We look forward to two exciting days in Linköping, and we thank the many people who have contributed to the organization of this year’s SweCog conference, in particular of course all authors and reviewers! The organization of SweCog 2018 has been supported by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Culture Communication (IKK), and the Department of Computer Information Science (IDA) at Linköpping University, as well as Cambio Healthcare Systems and Visual Sweden.

Tom Ziemke, Mattias Arvola, Nils Dahlbäc and Erik Billing

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Skövde: University of Skövde, 2018. p. 30
Series
Skövde University Studies in Informatics, ISSN 1653-2325 ; 2018:1
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-157110 (URN)9789198366730 (ISBN)
Conference
Swecog 2018, the 14th Swecog conference, Linköping, Sweden, October 11-12, 2018
Available from: 2019-05-28 Created: 2019-05-28 Last updated: 2019-05-28Bibliographically approved
Overkamp, T., Blomkvist, J., Rodrigues, V., Arvola, M. & Holmlid, S. (2018). Resource integration as a perspective on value in interaction design. In: : . Paper presented at British HCI 2018. BCS Learning and Development Ltd.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resource integration as a perspective on value in interaction design
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2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Service-dominant logic (SDL) is a theoretical framework that has impacted the development of service design. Resource integration, a core concept in SDL, provides a distinctive perspective that changes the perception of value in situations of interaction. In this paper, we explore the implications of applying the resource integration view on interaction in the context of an illustrative design project. We argue that considering the resources of each actor in a design situation elevates the discussion towards a more strategic level of service and value creation. Through the example, we draw implications of utilising this perspective in specifying, positioning and shaping interactions in the system to provide value for different actors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BCS Learning and Development Ltd., 2018
Keywords
interaction design, service design, resource integration, service-dominant logic, service logic
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149602 (URN)
Conference
British HCI 2018
Available from: 2018-07-09 Created: 2018-07-09 Last updated: 2019-06-13Bibliographically approved
Arvola, M., Samuelsson, M., Nordvall, M. & Ragnemalm, E. L. (2018). Simulated provocations: A hypermedia radio theatre for reflection on classroom management. Journal Simulation & Gaming, 49(2), 98-114
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Simulated provocations: A hypermedia radio theatre for reflection on classroom management
2018 (English)In: Journal Simulation & Gaming, ISSN 1046-8781, E-ISSN 1552-826X, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 98-114Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. Learning to manage a classroom is a difficult but important part of teacher education. Earlier research on simulations for learning classroom management has highlighted the difficulty of supporting reflection.

Purpose. This case study explores and evaluates the design of a simulation for student teachers’ reflection on classroom management.

Design. The design process resulted in the scenario-based SIMPROV simulation, which was made in the form of a hypermedia radio theatre that students go through in pairs or triads. Authoritarian, authoritative, democratic, and compliant leadership styles were built into the choices student teachers made.

Evaluation. The simulation was evaluated in two courses where the participants’ level of reflection and perceived knowledge improvement was measured using a questionnaire. Forty three first-year student teachers, 48 third-year student teachers, and 38 of the student teachers’ mentors participated in the evaluation.

Results. The results indicate that participants engaged in reflection and understanding to a high degree, and only to a low degree in critical reflection or habitual action.

Conclusions. The conclusions are that the scenario-based simulation designed as a hypermedia radio theatre supported knowledge improvement, understanding, and reflection and that social interaction during and after simulation sessions was an important feature.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
interaction design, simulation/gaming, reflection, learning, teacher education, classroom management
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-147331 (URN)10.1177/1046878118765594 (DOI)2-s2.0-85044749218 (Scopus ID)
Projects
SIMPROV - Simulerade provokationer
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2011-4741
Available from: 2018-04-18 Created: 2018-04-18 Last updated: 2018-05-14Bibliographically approved
Stergiadis, D. & Arvola, M. (2018). The user repertory grid technique to crowdsourced user research analysis: A mixed-methods approach to creating personas. In: Ekströmer, Philip; Schütte, Simon and Ölvander, Johan (Ed.), DS 91: Proceedings of NordDesign 2018, Linköping, Sweden, 14th - 17th August 2018: . Paper presented at NordDesign 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The user repertory grid technique to crowdsourced user research analysis: A mixed-methods approach to creating personas
2018 (English)In: DS 91: Proceedings of NordDesign 2018, Linköping, Sweden, 14th - 17th August 2018 / [ed] Ekströmer, Philip; Schütte, Simon and Ölvander, Johan, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

There are many different methods for analysing user research data in user-centred design. One method is to create personas. Personas are fictive characters with a name and a face. They are based on data about the users, and designers and other stakeholders can engage in them and empathize with them as a proxy for the actual users. Personas are communication tools that make it easier for a large group of developers and designers to focus on a shared view of whom the design is for. There are different ways of creating personas, including analysis of behavioural variables and goals, thematic analysis, and mixing qualitative and quantitative methods. Creating personas relies heavily on the expertise of the user researcher and others in the design team. The creation of personas could potentially benefit from crowdsourcing the analysis of user data and hence counteract the subjectivity inherent in persona creation. The aim of this case study is to tentatively explore the possibilities and difficulties of crowdsourcing persona creation facilitated by the repertory grid technique (RGT). RGT is a mixed-methods approach that combines qualitative and quantitative data and we used it to investigate individual participants’ view on the summaries and the views of the pool of participants. It is a method derived from personal construct theory (PCP), in which an individual is posed to have personal theories and expectations that direct how he or she views things (in this case a number of interview summaries). In the context of user research, we call the method User Repertory Grids. We had 28 participants in our crowdsourced analysis of five summarized user interviews. The participants’ personal constructs of the summarized interviews were elicited. We then visualized the results in Bertin plots and biplots, and we calculated the importance and dominance of the constructs. We conclude that User Repertory Grids has potential to complement other methods in user modelling, but it is, in the end, no escape from subjectivity. Using this method, the subjectivity of experts is transferred to a subjectivity of the crowd.

Keywords
user-centred design, personas, repertory grid technique, user experience, user research methods
National Category
Design Human Computer Interaction Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155631 (URN)978-91-7685-185-2 (ISBN)
Conference
NordDesign 2018
Available from: 2019-03-21 Created: 2019-03-21 Last updated: 2019-03-29
Ylirisku, S. & Arvola, M. (2018). The varieties of good design. In: Pieter E. Vermaas and Stéphane Vial (Ed.), Advancements in the philosophy of design: (pp. 51-70). Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The varieties of good design
2018 (English)In: Advancements in the philosophy of design / [ed] Pieter E. Vermaas and Stéphane Vial, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 51-70Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter explores the philosopher and logician Georg Henrik von Wright’s metaethical treatise of the varieties of goodness in the context of design. von Wright investigated the use of the notion of ‘good’ in language, and he identified six kinds of goodness: namely utilitarian goodness, instrumental goodness, technical goodness, medical goodness, hedonic goodness, and the good of man. We discuss these different kinds of goodness in relation to six design traditions that we identify, namely conceptual design, usability design, engineering design, ergonomics design, experience design and sustainability design. We argue that the design traditions are grounded in different appreciations of goodness, and that designers and design researchers can benefit from a more precise discernment of values that underpin design processes and design critique in different traditions. von Wright’s treatise serves as a point of departure for the appraisal of the multifaceted and relational character of the idea of good design and of the values of design. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2018
Series
Design Research Foundations, ISSN 2366-4622
Keywords
Design, Goodness, Varieties of goodness, Values, Design traditions, Virtues
National Category
Design Ethics Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-145584 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-73302-9_4 (DOI)978-3-319-73301-2 (ISBN)978-3-319-73302-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-03-06 Created: 2018-03-06 Last updated: 2018-03-07Bibliographically approved
Arvola, M., Bardzell, J., Holmlid, S. & Löwgren, J. (2018). What we mean by interactive form. interactions, 25(4), 6-7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What we mean by interactive form
2018 (English)In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 6-7Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [en]

The following blog post is edited from an email conversation between the authors about the concept of interactive form, which incidentally is the name of a course given at Linköping University. If you do teach a course, it might be a good idea to understand the meaning of the course name.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY: ACM Press, 2018
Keywords
interactive form, use qualities, interaction qualities, interaction design, aesthetics
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149589 (URN)10.1145/3226230 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-07-09 Created: 2018-07-09 Last updated: 2019-06-13
Johan, L. & Arvola, M. (2017). IPA in UX Research: Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis in a User Experience Design Practice. In: : . Paper presented at ECCE 2017 European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics, Umeå, Sweden, September 19-22, 2017 (pp. 17-24). New York, NY.: ACM Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>IPA in UX Research: Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis in a User Experience Design Practice
2017 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [sv]

One approach to user experience (UX) is phenomenology, but there are no well-defined methods for how to conduct UX research using phenomenology, especially not in a professional design practice. One well-defined approach developed in psychology is Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA), which in this paper is adapted to professional UX research practice. The adaptation is put to test in the case of understanding how newly-arrived immigrants to Sweden experience a start-up service that introduce them to the job market. Contributions and shortcomings of the method in the views of professional UX researchers and designers are documented and discussed. It is concluded that IPA contributes to UX research by investigating both experience and meaning, and by providing holistic insights appropriate for service design and the fuzzy front-end of innovation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY.: ACM Press, 2017
Keywords
user experience, interpretative phenomenological analysis, user research methods
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-148772 (URN)10.1145/3121283.3121299 (DOI)2-s2.0-85033453534 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-5256-7 (ISBN)
Conference
ECCE 2017 European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics, Umeå, Sweden, September 19-22, 2017
Available from: 2018-06-19 Created: 2018-06-19 Last updated: 2019-03-22Bibliographically approved
Thellman, S., Lundberg, J., Arvola, M. & Ziemke, T. (2017). What Is It Like to Be a Bot?: Toward More Immediate Wizard-of-Oz Control in Social Human–Robot Interaction. In: HAI 2017 Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Human Agent Interaction: . Paper presented at 5th International Conference on Human Agent Interaction, HAI 2017, Bielefeld, Germany 17-20 October 2017 (pp. 435-438). New York, NY.: ACM Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What Is It Like to Be a Bot?: Toward More Immediate Wizard-of-Oz Control in Social Human–Robot Interaction
2017 (English)In: HAI 2017 Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Human Agent Interaction, New York, NY.: ACM Press, 2017, p. 435-438Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Several Wizard-of-Oz techniques have been developed to make robots appear autonomous and more social in human-robot interaction. Many of the existing solutions use control interfaces that introduce significant time delays and hamper the robot operator's ability to produce socially appropriate responses in real time interactions. We present work in progress on a novel wizard control interface designed to overcome these limitations:a motion tracking-based system which allows the wizard to act as if he or she is the robot. The wizard sees the other through the robot's perspective, and uses his or her own bodily movements to control it. We discuss potential applications and extensions of this system, and conclude by discussing possible methodological advantages and disadvantages.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY.: ACM Press, 2017
Keywords
social robotics, social interaction, Wizard of Oz; HRI methodology, HTC Vive, humanoid, Pepper robot
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-148767 (URN)10.1145/3125739.3132580 (DOI)978-1-4503-5113-3 (ISBN)
Conference
5th International Conference on Human Agent Interaction, HAI 2017, Bielefeld, Germany 17-20 October 2017
Available from: 2018-06-19 Created: 2018-06-19 Last updated: 2019-03-22
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2919-098X

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