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Tai, F.-i., Sterner, O., Andersson, O., Ekblad, T. & Ederth, T. (2019). Interaction Forces on Polyampholytic Hydrogel Gradient Surfaces. ACS Omega, 4(3), 5670-5681
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interaction Forces on Polyampholytic Hydrogel Gradient Surfaces
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2019 (English)In: ACS Omega, ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 5670-5681Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rational design and informed development of nontoxic antifouling coatings requires a thorough understanding of the interactions between surfaces and fouling species. With more complex antifouling materials, such as composites or zwitterionic polymers, there follows also a need for better characterization of the materials as such. To further the understanding of the antifouling properties of charge-balanced polymers, we explore the properties of layered polyelectrolytes and their interactions with charged surfaces. These polymers were prepared via self-initiated photografting and photopolymerization (SIPGP); on top of a uniform bottom layer of anionic poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA), a cationic poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) thickness gradient was formed. Infrared microscopy and imaging spectroscopic ellipsometry were used to characterize chemical composition and swelling of the combined layer. Direct force measurements by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy were performed to investigate the forces between the polymer gradients and charged probes. The swelling of PMAA and PDMAEMA are very different, with steric and electrostatic forces varying in a nontrivial manner along the gradient. The gradients can be tuned to form a protein-resistant charge-neutral region, and we demonstrate that this region, where both electrostatic and steric forces are small, is highly compressed and the origin of the protein resistance of this region is most likely an effect of strong hydration of charged residues at the surface, rather than swelling or bulk hydration of the polymer. In the highly swollen regions far from charge-neutrality, steric forces dominate the interactions between the probe and the polymer. In these regions, the SIPGP polymer has qualitative similarities with brushes, but we were unable to quantitatively describe the polymer as a brush, supporting previous data suggesting that these polymers are cross-linked.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2019
National Category
Polymer Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-156495 (URN)10.1021/acsomega.9b00339 (DOI)000462921900124 ()2-s2.0-85063358089 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agencies: European Commissions Sixth Framework Program Integrated Project AMBIO (Advanced Nanostructured Surfaces for the Control of Biofouling) [NMP-CT-2005-011827]; European Communitys Seventh Framework Program [237997]; Swedish Government Strategic Research Area

Available from: 2019-04-24 Created: 2019-04-24 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved
Li, Z., Sun, H., Hsiao, C.-L., Yao, Y., Xiao, Y., Shahi, M., . . . Zhang, F. (2018). A Free-Standing High-Output Power Density Thermoelectric Device Based on Structure-Ordered PEDOT:PSS. Advanced Electronic Materials, 4(2), Article ID 1700496.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Free-Standing High-Output Power Density Thermoelectric Device Based on Structure-Ordered PEDOT:PSS
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2018 (English)In: Advanced Electronic Materials, ISSN 2199-160X, Vol. 4, no 2, article id 1700496Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A free-standing high-output power density polymeric thermoelectric (TE) device is realized based on a highly conductive (approximate to 2500 S cm(-1)) structure-ordered poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate film (denoted as FS-PEDOT:PSS) with a Seebeck coefficient of 20.6 mu V K-1, an in-plane thermal conductivity of 0.64 W m(-1) K-1, and a peak power factor of 107 mu W K-2 m(-1) at room temperature. Under a small temperature gradient of 29 K, the TE device demonstrates a maximum output power density of 99 +/- 18.7 mu W cm(-2), which is the highest value achieved in pristine PEDOT:PSS based TE devices. In addition, a fivefold output power is demonstrated by series connecting five devices into a flexible thermoelectric module. The simplicity of assembling the films into flexible thermoelectric modules, the low out-of-plane thermal conductivity of 0.27 W m(-1) K-1, and free-standing feature indicates the potential to integrate the FS-PEDOT:PSS TE modules with textiles to power wearable electronics by harvesting human bodys heat. In addition to the high power factor, the high thermal stability of the FS-PEDOT:PSS films up to 250 degrees C is confirmed by in situ temperature-dependent X-ray diffraction and grazing incident wide angle X-ray scattering, which makes the FS-PEDOT:PSS films promising candidates for thermoelectric applications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, 2018
Keywords
free-standing PEDOT:PSS film; output power density; p-type; thermoelectric generators
National Category
Other Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-145465 (URN)10.1002/aelm.201700496 (DOI)000424888600015 ()2-s2.0-85039784826 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Vinnova Marie Curie incoming project [2016-04112]; Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Functional Materials at Linkoping University [200900971]; Recruitment Program of Global Youth Experts; National Natural Science Foundation of China [21474035]; United States National Science Foundation [DMR-1262261]; Open Fund of the State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices [2016-skllmd-03]; European Research Council [ERC 307596]

Available from: 2018-03-13 Created: 2018-03-13 Last updated: 2018-04-09Bibliographically approved
Ederth, T. (2018). Neutrons for scattering: What they are, where to get them, and how to deal with them. EPJ Web of Conferences, 188, Article ID 01002.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neutrons for scattering: What they are, where to get them, and how to deal with them
2018 (English)In: EPJ Web of Conferences, ISSN 2101-6275, E-ISSN 2100-014X, Vol. 188, article id 01002Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In neutron scattering studies of soft matter, a diverse array of methods and instruments are used, providing information on structure and dynamics on various length and energy scales. However, much of the infrastructure needed for neutron scattering is common for many instruments. After a brief historical retrospect of neutron scattering, this chapter introduces the basic infrastructure needed to conduct scattering experiments. This includes equipment that is used to produce, spectrally adjust and purify, and to deliver neutrons to the instruments where scattering experiments are conducted. The basics of the interaction of neutrons with matter is also introduced, as a preparation for the final sections on the different means at hand for neutron detection.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
EDP Sciences, 2018
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-151458 (URN)10.1051/epjconf/201818801002 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-09-21 Created: 2018-09-21 Last updated: 2018-09-21Bibliographically approved
Yandi, W., Mieszkin, S., di Fino, A., Martin-Tanchereau, P., Callow, M. E., Callow, J. A., . . . Ederth, T. (2016). Charged hydrophilic polymer brushes and their relevance for understanding marine biofouling. Biofouling (Print), 32(6), 609-625
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Charged hydrophilic polymer brushes and their relevance for understanding marine biofouling
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2016 (English)In: Biofouling (Print), ISSN 0892-7014, E-ISSN 1029-2454, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 609-625Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The resistance of charged polymers to biofouling was investigated by subjecting cationic (PDMAEMA), anionic (PSPMA), neutral (PHEMA-co-PEG10MA), and zwitterionic (PSBMA) brushes to assays testing protein adsorption; attachment of the marine bacterium Cobetia marina; settlement and adhesion strength of zoospores of the green alga Ulva linza; settlement of barnacle (Balanus amphitrite and B. improvisus) cypris larvae; and field immersion tests. Several results go beyond the expected dependence on direct electrostatic attraction; PSPMA showed good resistance towards attachment of C. marina, low settlement and adhesion of U. linza zoospores, and significantly lower biofouling than on PHEMA-co-PEG10MA or PSBMA after a field test for one week. PDMAEMA showed potential as a contact-active anti-algal coating due to its capacity to damage attached spores. However, after field testing for eight weeks, there were no significant differences in biofouling coverage among the surfaces. While charged polymers are unsuitable as antifouling coatings in the natural environment, they provide valuable insights into fouling processes, and are relevant for studies due to charging of nominally neutral surfaces.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
Keywords
Balanus spp.; Cobetia marina; Polymer brushes; Ulva linza; antifouling surfaces; surface charge
National Category
Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127522 (URN)10.1080/08927014.2016.1170816 (DOI)000377117900001 ()27125564 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies:This study has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Program FP7/2007-2013 [ grant agreement number 237997] (SEACOAT). TE acknowledges financial support from the Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Functional Materials at Linkoping University [Faculty Grant SFO-Mat-LiU #2009-00971].

Available from: 2016-05-02 Created: 2016-05-02 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Maleshlijski, S., Sendra, G. H., Aldred, N., Clare, A. S., Liedberg, B., Grunze, M., . . . Rosenhahn, A. (2016). Imaging SPR combined with stereoscopic 3D tracking to study barnacle cyprid-surface interactions. Surface Science, 643, 172-177
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Imaging SPR combined with stereoscopic 3D tracking to study barnacle cyprid-surface interactions
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2016 (English)In: Surface Science, ISSN 0039-6028, E-ISSN 1879-2758, Vol. 643, p. 172-177Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Barnacle larvae (cyprids) explore surfaces to identify suitable settlement sites. This process is selective, and cyprids respond to numerous surface cues. To better understand the settlement process, it is desirable to simultaneously monitor both the surface exploration behavior and any close interactions with the surface. Stereoscopic 3D tracking of the cyprids provides quantitative access to surface exploration and pre-settlement rituals. Imaging surface plasmon resonance (SPR) reveals any interactions with the surfaces, such as surface inspection during bipedal walking and deposition of temporary adhesives. We report on a combination of both techniques to bring together information on swimming behavior in the vicinity of the interface and physical interactions of the cyprid with the surface. The technical requirements are described, and we applied the setup to cyprids of Balanus amphitrite. Initial data shows the applicability of the combined instrument to correlate exploration and touchdown events on surfaces with different chemical termination. (C) 2015 Published by Elsevier B.V.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2016
Keywords
Barnacle cyprid; Balanus amphitrite; Stereoscopic 3D tracking; Surface exploration; Imaging surface plasmon resonance; Temporary adhesive
National Category
Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124101 (URN)10.1016/j.susc.2015.08.027 (DOI)000366790700026 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|European Communitys Seventh Framework Programme FP7 [23797]; Office of Naval Research [N000141210498, N000141512324, N00014-13-1-0634, N00014-13-1-0633]

Available from: 2016-01-25 Created: 2016-01-19 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Ullah Khan, Z., Bubnova, O., Jafari, M. J., Brooke, R., Liu, X., Gabrielsson, R., . . . Crispin, X. (2015). Acido-basic control of the thermoelectric properties of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)tosylate (PEDOT-Tos) thin films. Journal of Materials Chemistry C, 3, 10616-10623
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acido-basic control of the thermoelectric properties of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)tosylate (PEDOT-Tos) thin films
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Materials Chemistry C, ISSN 2050-7526, E-ISSN 2050-7534, Vol. 3, p. 10616-10623Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PEDOT-Tos is one of the conducting polymers that displays the most promising thermoelectric properties. Until now, it has been utterly difficult to control all the synthesis parameters and the morphology governing the thermoelectric properties. To improve our understanding of this material, we study the variation in the thermoelectric properties by a simple acido-basic treatment. The emphasis of this study is to elucidate the chemical changes induced by acid (HCl) or base (NaOH) treatment in PEDOT-Tos thin films using various spectroscopic and structural techniques. We could identify changes in the nanoscale morphology due to anion exchange between tosylate and Cl- or OH-. But, we identified that changing the pH leads to a tuning of the oxidation level of the polymer, which can explain the changes in thermoelectric properties. Hence, a simple acid-base treatment allows finding the optimum for the power factor in PEDOT-Tos thin films.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society of Chemistry, 2015
National Category
Polymer Chemistry Textile, Rubber and Polymeric Materials
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121977 (URN)10.1039/C5TC01952D (DOI)000363251600035 ()
Note

Funding agencies: European Research Council (ERC) [307596]

Available from: 2015-10-14 Created: 2015-10-14 Last updated: 2018-08-20Bibliographically approved
Nugraha, R., Finlay, J. A., Hill, S., Fyrner, T., Yandi, W., Callow, M. E., . . . Ederth, T. (2015). Antifouling properties of oligo(lactose)-based self-assembled monolayers. Biofouling (Print), 31(1), 123-134
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Antifouling properties of oligo(lactose)-based self-assembled monolayers
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2015 (English)In: Biofouling (Print), ISSN 0892-7014, E-ISSN 1029-2454, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 123-134Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The antifouling (AF) properties of oligo(lactose)-based self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), using four different proteins, zoospores of the green alga Ulva linza and cells of the diatom Navicula incerta, were investigated. The SAM-forming alkylthiols, which contained 1, 2 or 3 lactose units, showed significant variation in AF properties, with no differences in wettability. Non-specific adsorption of albumin and pepsin was low on all surfaces. Adsorption of lysozyme and fibrinogen decreased with increasing number of lactose units in the SAM, in agreement with the generally observed phenomenon that thicker hydrated layers provide higher barriers to protein adsorption. Settlement of spores of U. linza followed an opposite trend, being greater on the bulkier, more hydrated SAMs. These SAMs are more ordered for the larger saccharide units, and it is therefore hypothesized that the degree of order, and differences in crystallinity or stiffness between the surfaces, is an important parameter regulating spore settlement on these surfaces.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor andamp; Francis: STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Titles, 2015
Keywords
marine biofouling; oligo(lactose); self-assembled monolayer; Ulva linza; Navicula incerta; protein resistance
National Category
Physical Sciences Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114588 (URN)10.1080/08927014.2014.1001841 (DOI)000348531500011 ()25629533 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|European Community [23797]; Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Functional Materials at Linkoping University [2009-00971]; ONR (USA) [N0001-08-1-0010]

Available from: 2015-02-27 Created: 2015-02-26 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Golabi, M., Jafari, M. J., Jager, E., Turner, A. & Ederth, T. (2015). ATR-FTIR: a simple and rapid tool for bacterial resistance detection. In: Conference on Advanced Vibrational Spectroscopy - ICAVS, Vienna, Austria, 12- 17 July 2015.: . Paper presented at Conference on Advanced Vibrational Spectroscopy - ICAVS, Vienna, Austria, 12- 17 July 2015..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ATR-FTIR: a simple and rapid tool for bacterial resistance detection
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2015 (Swedish)In: Conference on Advanced Vibrational Spectroscopy - ICAVS, Vienna, Austria, 12- 17 July 2015., 2015Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-118105 (URN)
Conference
Conference on Advanced Vibrational Spectroscopy - ICAVS, Vienna, Austria, 12- 17 July 2015.
Available from: 2015-05-21 Created: 2015-05-21 Last updated: 2017-01-11
Petrone, L., Aldred, N., Emami, K., Enander, K., Ederth, T. & Clare, A. S. (2015). Chemistry-specific surface adsorption of the barnacle settlement-inducing protein complex. Interface Focus, 5(1), 20140047
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chemistry-specific surface adsorption of the barnacle settlement-inducing protein complex
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2015 (English)In: Interface Focus, ISSN 2042-8898, E-ISSN 2042-8901, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 20140047-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Gregarious settlement in barnacle larvae (cyprids) is induced by a contact pheromone, the settlement-inducing protein complex (SIPC). The SIPC has been identified both in the cuticle of adult barnacles and in the temporary adhesive secretion (footprint) of cyprids. Besides acting as a settlement inducer, the presence of the SIPC in footprints points to its additional involvement in the adhesion process. SIPC adsorption behaviour was therefore investigated on a series of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) by surface plasmon resonance at the pH of seawater (8.3). Fibrinogen and alpha(2)-macroglobulin (A2M) (blood complement protease inhibitors with which the SIPC shares 29% sequence homology) were used in the adsorption experiments as positive and negative standards, respectively. The mass uptake of the SIPC was comparable to that of fibrinogen, with adsorption observed even on the protein-resistant oligo(ethylene glycol) surface. Notably, on the positively charged SAM the SIPC showed a kinetic overshoot, indicating a metastable configuration causing the amount of adsorbed protein to temporarily exceed its equilibrium value. A2M adsorption was low or negligible on all SAMs tested, except for the positively charged surface, indicating that A2M adsorption is mainly driven by electrostatics. Evaluation of SIPC non-specific adsorption kinetics revealed that it adsorbed irreversibly and non-cooperatively on all surfaces tested.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society, The, 2015
Keywords
barnacle; self-assembled monolayer; surface plasmon resonance; adhesion; settlement-inducing protein complex; kinetic overshoot
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113714 (URN)10.1098/rsfs.2014.0047 (DOI)000346703200003 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|European Community [237997]; Office of Naval Research [N00014-08-1-1240]; COST Action [TD0906]

Available from: 2015-01-30 Created: 2015-01-29 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Vater, S. M., Finlay, J., Callow, M. E., Callow, J. A., Ederth, T., Liedberg, B., . . . Rosenhahn, A. (2015). Holographic microscopy provides new insights into the settlement of zoospores of the green alga Ulva linza on cationic oligopeptide surfaces. Biofouling (Print), 31(2), 229-239
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Holographic microscopy provides new insights into the settlement of zoospores of the green alga Ulva linza on cationic oligopeptide surfaces
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2015 (English)In: Biofouling (Print), ISSN 0892-7014, E-ISSN 1029-2454, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 229-239Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Interaction of zoospores of Ulva linza with cationic, arginine-rich oligopeptide self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) is characterized by rapid settlement. Some spores settle (ie permanently attach) in a normal manner involving the secretion of a permanent adhesive, retraction of the flagella and cell wall formation, whilst others undergo pseudosettlement whereby motile spores are trapped (attached) on the SAM surface without undergoing the normal metamorphosis into a settled spore. Holographic microscopy was used to record videos of swimming zoospores in the vicinity of surfaces with different cationic oligopeptide concentrations to provide time-resolved insights into processes associated with attachment of spores. The data reveal that spore attachment rate increases with increasing cationic peptide content. Accordingly, the decrease in swimming activity in the volume of seawater above the surface accelerated with increasing surface charge. Three-dimensional trajectories of individual swimming spores showed a hit and stick motion pattern, exclusively observed for the arginine-rich peptide SAMs, whereby spores were immediately trapped upon contact with the surface.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis: STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Titles, 2015
Keywords
holographic microscopy; cationic peptides; zoospores; Ulva linza; tracking; 3-dimensional motility
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-118256 (URN)10.1080/08927014.2015.1022534 (DOI)000353565900010 ()25875964 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|US Office of Naval Research [N000141210498, N0001-08-1-0010]; EU project AMBIO; DFG [RO 2524/2-2]

Available from: 2015-05-22 Created: 2015-05-22 Last updated: 2017-12-04
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1639-5735

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