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Rasmusson, Birgitta
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 26) Show all publications
Ottinger, T., Gavier-Widen, D., Hard af Segerstad, C. & Rasmusson, B. (2012). DEVELOPMENT OF VETERINARY FORENSIC PATHOLOGY FROM CRIME SCENE TO COURT in JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE PATHOLOGY, vol 146, issue 1, pp 61-61. In: JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE PATHOLOGY (pp. 61-61). Elsevier, 146(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>DEVELOPMENT OF VETERINARY FORENSIC PATHOLOGY FROM CRIME SCENE TO COURT in JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE PATHOLOGY, vol 146, issue 1, pp 61-61
2012 (English)In: JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE PATHOLOGY, Elsevier , 2012, Vol. 146, no 1, p. 61-61Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

n/a

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2012
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-75733 (URN)000300141900067 ()
Available from: 2012-03-09 Created: 2012-03-09 Last updated: 2012-03-09
Hedman, J., Nordgaard, A., Dufva, C., Rasmusson, B., Ansell, R. & Rådström, P. (2010). Synergy between DNA polymerases increases polymerase chain reaction inhibitor tolerance in forensic DNA analysis. Analytical Biochemistry, 405, 192-200
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Synergy between DNA polymerases increases polymerase chain reaction inhibitor tolerance in forensic DNA analysis
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2010 (English)In: Analytical Biochemistry, ISSN 0003-2697, E-ISSN 1096-0309, Vol. 405, p. 192-200Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The success rate of diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis is lowered by inhibitory substancespresent in the samples. Recently, we showed that tolerance to PCR inhibitors in crime scene salivastains can be improved by replacing the standard DNA polymerase AmpliTaq Gold with alternative DNApolymerase–buffer systems (Hedman et al., BioTechniques 47 (2009) 951–958). Here we show thatblending inhibitor-resistant DNA polymerase–buffer systems further increases the success rate of PCRfor various types of real crime scene samples showing inhibition. For 34 of 42 ‘‘inhibited” crime scenestains, the DNA profile quality was significantly improved using a DNA polymerase blend of ExTaq HotStart and PicoMaxx High Fidelity compared with AmpliTaq Gold. The significance of the results was confirmedby analysis of variance. The blend performed as well as, or better than, the alternative DNA polymerasesused separately for all tested sample types. When used separately, the performance of the DNApolymerases varied depending on the nature of the sample. The superiority of the blend is discussed interms of complementary effects and synergy between the DNA polymerase–buffer systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
-: Elsevier Inc., 2010
Keywords
DNA polymerase, DNA polymerase blend, Forensic DNA analysis, PCR inhibition, PCR inhibitors, Synergy
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-58545 (URN)10.1016/j.ab.2010.06.028 (DOI)
Available from: 2010-08-13 Created: 2010-08-13 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Nordenfelt, P., Winberg Tinnerfelt, M., Lonnbro, P., Rasmusson, B. & Tapper, H. (2009). Different Requirements for Early and Late Phases of Azurophilic Granule-Phagosome Fusion. TRAFFIC, 10(12), 1881-1893
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Different Requirements for Early and Late Phases of Azurophilic Granule-Phagosome Fusion
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2009 (English)In: TRAFFIC, ISSN 1398-9219, Vol. 10, no 12, p. 1881-1893Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Phagocytosis and killing of microorganisms are complex processes that involve tightly regulated membrane traffic events. Because many signaling molecules associate with membrane rafts and because these structures can be found on azurophilic granules, we decided to investigate raft recruitment and the signaling requirements for azurophilic granule secretion during phagosome maturation. At the site of phagocytosis of immunoglobulin G-opsonized prey in human neutrophils, we found that early secretion of azurophilic granules was both raft- and calcium-dependent. Subsequently, rafts at the phagocytic site were internalized with the prey. At the fully formed phagosome, the fusion of azurophilic granules was no longer dependent on rafts or calcium. These findings were found to be true also when using Streptococcus pyogenes bacteria as prey, and depletion of calcium affected the kinetics of bacterial intracellular survival. These findings suggest that the mechanisms for delivery of azurophilic content to nascent and sealed phagosomes, respectively, differ in their dependence on calcium and membrane rafts.

Keywords
azurophilic granules, calcium, HL-60 cells, membrane rafts, membrane traffic, neutrophil, phagosome
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-52369 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0854.2009.00986.x (DOI)
Available from: 2009-12-18 Created: 2009-12-18 Last updated: 2009-12-18
Hedman, J., Nordgaard, A., Rasmusson, B., Ansell, R. & Radstrom, P. (2009). Improved forensic DNA analysis through the use of alternative DNA polymerases and statistical modeling of DNA profiles. BIOTECHNIQUES, 47(5), 951-958
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improved forensic DNA analysis through the use of alternative DNA polymerases and statistical modeling of DNA profiles
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2009 (English)In: BIOTECHNIQUES, ISSN 0736-6205, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 951-958Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

DNA evidence, linking perpetrators to crime scenes, is central to many legal proceedings. However, DNA samples from crime scenes often contain PCR-inhibitory substances, which may generate blank or incomplete DNA profiles. Extensive DNA purification can be required to rid the sample of these inhibitors, although these procedures increase the risk of DNA loss. Most forensic laboratories use commercial DNA amplification kits (e.g., AmpFlSTR SGM Plus) with the DNA polymerase AmpliTaq Gold as the gold standard. Here, we show that alternative DNA polymerase-buffer systems can improve the quality of forensic DNA analysis and efficiently circumvent PCR inhibition in crime scene samples, without additional sample preparation. DNA profiles from 20 of 32 totally or partially inhibited crime scene saliva samples were significantly improved using Bio-X-Act Short, ExTaq Hot Start, or PicoMaxx High Fidelity instead of AmpliTaq Gold. A statistical model for unbiased quality control of forensic DNA profiles was developed to quantify the results. Our study demonstrates the importance of adjusting the chemistry of the PCR to enhance forensic DNA analysis and diagnostic PCR, providing an alternative to laborious sample preparation protocols.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Eaton Publishing, 2009
Keywords
crime scene samples, DNA polymerase, forensic DNA analysis, PCR inhibition, principal components, statistical modeling
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-56691 (URN)10.2144/000113246 (DOI)000277560200010 ()
Available from: 2010-05-31 Created: 2010-05-31 Last updated: 2012-01-17
Winberg Tinnerfelt, M., Holm, Å., Särndahl, E., Vinet, A. F., Descoteaux, A., Magnusson, K.-E., . . . Lerm, M. (2009). Leishmania donovani lipophosphoglycan inhibits phagosomal maturation via action on membrane rafts. Microbes and infection, 11(2), 215-222
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Leishmania donovani lipophosphoglycan inhibits phagosomal maturation via action on membrane rafts
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2009 (English)In: Microbes and infection, ISSN 1286-4579, E-ISSN 1769-714X, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 215-222Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lipophosphoglycan (LPG), the major surface glycoconjugate on Leishmania donovani promastigotes, is crucial for the establishment of infection inside macrophages. LPG comprises a polymer of repeating Gal beta 1,4Man alpha-PO4 attached to a lysophosphatidylinositol membrane anchor. LPG is transferred from the parasite to the host macrophage membrane during phagocytosis and induces periphagosomal F-actin accumulation correlating with an inhibition of phagosomal maturation. The biophysical properties of LPG suggest that it may be intercalated into membrane rafts of the host-cell membrane. The aim of this study was to investigate if the effects of LPG on phagosomal maturation are mediated via action on membrane rafts. We show that LPG accumulates in rafts during phagocytosis of L. donovani and that disruption of membrane rafts abolished the effects of LPG on periphagosomal F-actin and phagosomal maturation, indicating that LPG requires intact membrane rafts to manipulate host-cell functions. We conclude that LPG associates with membrane rafts in the host cell and exert its actions on host-cell actin and phagosomal maturation through subversion of raft function.

Keywords
Leishmania, Lipophosphoglycan, Membrane rafts, Phagosomal maturation, Actin
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17886 (URN)10.1016/j.micinf.2008.11.007 (DOI)
Note

Original Publication: Martin Winberg Tinnerfelt, Åsa Holm, Eva Särndahl, Adrien F Vinet, Albert Descoteaux, Karl-Eric Magnusson, Birgitta Rasmusson and Maria Lerm, Leishmania donovani lipophosphoglycan inhibits phagosomal maturation via action on membrane rafts, 2009, MICROBES AND INFECTION, (11), 2, 215-222. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.micinf.2008.11.007 Copyright: Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. http://www.elsevier.com/

Available from: 2009-05-20 Created: 2009-04-24 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Ansell, R. & Rasmusson, B. (2008). A Swedish PerspectiveThe Forensic Use of Bioinformation: Ethical Issues: Nuffield Council on Bioethics. BioSocieties, 3(1), 88-92
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Swedish PerspectiveThe Forensic Use of Bioinformation: Ethical Issues: Nuffield Council on Bioethics
2008 (English)In: BioSocieties, ISSN 1745-8552, E-ISSN 1745-8560, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 88-92Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

The Nuffield Report is well-written, clear, extensive and up to date, and it covers most of the major ethical issues in the field of forensic DNA analysis and database searching. The ethical analysis is thorough and based on solid theoretical ground.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Palgrave Macmillan, 2008
National Category
Forensic Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-42490 (URN)10.1017/S174585520800598X (DOI)65040 (Local ID)65040 (Archive number)65040 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Welin, A., Winberg Tinnerfelt, M., Abdalla, H., Särndahl Lindblom, E., Rasmusson, B., Stendahl, O. & Lerm, M. (2008). Incorporation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoarabinomannan into macrophage membrane rafts is a prerequisite for the phagosomal maturation block.. Infection and Immunity, 76(7), 2882-2887
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Incorporation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoarabinomannan into macrophage membrane rafts is a prerequisite for the phagosomal maturation block.
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2008 (English)In: Infection and Immunity, ISSN 0019-9567, E-ISSN 1098-5522, Vol. 76, no 7, p. 2882-2887Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lipoarabinomannan (LAM) is one of the key virulence factors for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of tuberculosis. During uptake of mycobacteria, LAM interacts with the cell membrane of the host macrophage and can be detected throughout the cell upon infection. LAM can inhibit phagosomal maturation as well as induce a proinflammatory response in bystander cells. The aim of this study was to investigate how LAM exerts its action on human macrophages. We show that LAM is incorporated into membrane rafts of the macrophage cell membrane via its glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor and that incorporation of mannose-capped LAM from M. tuberculosis results in reduced phagosomal maturation. This is dependent on successful insertion of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. LAM does not, however, induce the phagosomal maturation block through activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, contradicting some previous suggestions.

National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-20816 (URN)10.1128/IAI.01549-07 (DOI)18426888 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-09-22 Created: 2009-09-22 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Tejle, K., Lindroth, M., Magnusson, K.-E. & Rasmusson, B. (2008). Wild-type Leishmania donovani promastigotes block maturation, increase integrin expression and inhibit detachment of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells - The influence of phosphoglycans. FEMS Microbiology Letters, 279(1), 92-102
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wild-type Leishmania donovani promastigotes block maturation, increase integrin expression and inhibit detachment of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells - The influence of phosphoglycans
2008 (English)In: FEMS Microbiology Letters, ISSN 0378-1097, E-ISSN 1574-6968, Vol. 279, no 1, p. 92-102Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The protective immune response against the parasite, including the role of dendritic cells (DC) in the course of infection, plays a fundamental role. This study shows that wild-type (WT) Leishmania promastigotes and specifically the phosphoglycans family of virulence-associated antigens inhibit human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDC) maturation and detachment to distinct surfaces. Immature phagocytosis of Leishmania donovani promastigotes by immature MoDC results in the increased expression of CD11b and CD51, and inhibition of cell detachment to distinct surfaces, which was dependent on the presence of phosphoglycans. These findings demonstrate that phosphoglycans of WT L. donovani might also inhibit human DC migration to lymphoid organs. © 2007 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-43422 (URN)10.1111/j.1574-6968.2007.01013.x (DOI)73822 (Local ID)73822 (Archive number)73822 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Winberg Tinnerfelt, M., Rasmusson, B. & Sundqvist, T. (2007). Leishmania donovani: Inhibition of phagosomal maturation is rescued by nitric oxide in macrophages. Experimental parasitology, 117(2), 165-170
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Leishmania donovani: Inhibition of phagosomal maturation is rescued by nitric oxide in macrophages
2007 (English)In: Experimental parasitology, ISSN 0014-4894, E-ISSN 1090-2449, Vol. 117, no 2, p. 165-170Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Leishmania donovani promastigotes, the causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis, survive inside macrophages by inhibiting phagosomal maturation. The main surface glycoconjugate on promastigotes, lipophosphoglycan (LPG), is crucial for parasite survival. LPG has several detrimental effects on macrophage function, including inhibition of periphagosomal filamentous actin (F-actin) breakdown during phagosomal maturation. However, in RAW 264.7 macrophages pre-stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon ? (IFN?), known to up-regulate inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitric oxide (NO) production, L. donovani promastigotes are unable to inhibit periphagosomal F-actin breakdown and phagosomal maturation proceeds normally. Moreover, the iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine, blocked the positive effects of LPS/IFN? suggesting that NO is a key player in F-actin remodeling. In conclusion, production of NO by stimulated macrophages seems to allow phagosomal maturation following uptake of L. donovani promastigotes, suggesting a novel mechanism whereby NO facilitates killing of an intracellular pathogen. © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Actin, AG, aminoguanidine, bovine serum albumine, BSA, cGMP, F-actin, filamentous actin, gamma Interferon, GFP, green fluorescent protein, guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate, IFN?, inducible nitric oxide synthase, iNOS, Leishmania donovani, lipophosphoglycan, lipopolysaccharide, LPG, LPS, Maturation, Nitric oxide, nitric oxide, NO, paraformaldehyde, PFA, Phagosome
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-48433 (URN)10.1016/j.exppara.2007.04.004 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Lerm, M., Holm, Å., Seiron, Å., Särndahl, E., Magnusson, K.-E. & Rasmusson, B. (2006). Leishmania donovani requires functional Cdc42 and Rac1 to prevent phagosomal maturation. Infection and Immunity, 74(5), 2613-2618
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Leishmania donovani requires functional Cdc42 and Rac1 to prevent phagosomal maturation
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2006 (English)In: Infection and Immunity, ISSN 0019-9567, E-ISSN 1098-5522, Vol. 74, no 5, p. 2613-2618Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Leishmania donovani promastigotes survive inside macrophage phagosomes by inhibiting phagosomal maturation. The main surface glycoconjugate on promastigotes, lipophosphoglycan (LPG), is crucial for survival and mediates the formation of a protective shell of F-actin around the phagosome. Previous studies have demonstrated that this effect involves inhibition of protein kinase Cα. The present study shows that functional Cdc42 and Rac1 are required for the formation of F-actin around L. donovani phagosomes. Moreover, we present data showing that phagosomes containing LPG-defective L. donovani, which is unable to induce F-actin accumulation, display both elevated levels of periphagosomal F-actin and impaired phagosomal maturation in macrophages with permanently active forms of Cdc42 and Rac1. We conclude that L. donovani engages Cdc42 and Rac1 to build up a protective coat of F-actin around its phagosome to prevent phagosomal maturation. Copyright © 2006, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-35218 (URN)10.1128/IAI.74.5.2613-2618.2006 (DOI)25767 (Local ID)25767 (Archive number)25767 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
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