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Peterzén, Bengt
Publications (10 of 27) Show all publications
Hubbert, L., Sundbom, P., Loebe, M., Peterzén, B., Granfeldt, H. & Ahn, H. (2014). Acoustic Analysis of a Mechanical Circulatory Support. Artificial Organs, 38(7), 593-598
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acoustic Analysis of a Mechanical Circulatory Support
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2014 (English)In: Artificial Organs, ISSN 0160-564X, E-ISSN 1525-1594, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 593-598Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mechanical circulatory support technology is continually improving. However, adverse complications do occur with devastating consequences, for example, pump thrombosis that may develop in several parts of the pump system. The aim of this study was to design an experimental clot/thrombosis model to register and analyze acoustic signals from the left ventricular assist device (LVAD) HeartMate II (HMII) (Thoratec Corporation, Inc., Pleasanton, CA, USA) and detect changes in sound signals correlating to clots in the inflow, outflow, and pump housing. Using modern telecom techniques, it was possible to register and analyze the HMII pump-specific acoustic fingerprint in an experimental model of LVAD support using a mock loop. Increase in pump speed significantly (P less than 0.005) changed the acoustic fingerprint at certain frequency (0-23 000 Hz) intervals (regions: R1-3 and peaks: P1,3-4). When the ball valves connected to the tubing were narrowed sequentially by similar to 50% of the inner diameter (to mimic clot in the out-and inflow tubing), the frequency spectrum changed significantly (P less than 0.005) in P1 and P2 and R1 when the outflow tubing was narrowed. This change was not seen to the same extent when the lumen of the ball valve connected to the inflow tube was narrowed by similar to 50%. More significant (P less than 0.005) acoustic changes were detected in P1 and P2 and R1 and R3, with the largest dB figs. in the lower frequency ranges in R1 and P2, when artificial clots and blood clots passed through the pump system. At higher frequencies, a significant change in dB figs. in R3 and P4 was detected when clots passed through the pump system. Acoustic monitoring of pump sounds may become a valuable tool in LVAD surveillance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2014
Keywords
Mechanical circulatory support; Frequency analysis; Thrombosis
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112071 (URN)10.1111/aor.12244 (DOI)000343223400001 ()24372095 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-11-14 Created: 2014-11-13 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Sundbom, P., Hedayati, E., Peterzén, B., Granfeldt, H., Casimir Ahn, H. & Hübbert, L. (2014). Young Woman With Breast Cancer and Cardiotoxicity With Severe Heart Failure Treated With a HeartMate II (TM) for Nearly 6 Years Before Heart Transplantation. ASAIO journal (1992), 60(6), E3-E4
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Young Woman With Breast Cancer and Cardiotoxicity With Severe Heart Failure Treated With a HeartMate II (TM) for Nearly 6 Years Before Heart Transplantation
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2014 (English)In: ASAIO journal (1992), ISSN 1058-2916, E-ISSN 1538-943X, Vol. 60, no 6, p. E3-E4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cardiotoxicity is a multifactorial problem, which has emerged with the improvement of cancer therapies and survival. Heart transplantation is relatively contraindicated in patients with breast cancer, until at least 5 years after complete remission. We present a case where a young woman who in 2001, at the age of 31, was diagnosed with breast cancer. She was considered cured, but 4 years later she suffered a relapse. During her second treatment, in 2006, she suffered from severe heart failure. She received a HeartMate II, as a long-term bridge to transplantation and 6 years later she was successfully transplanted. In this case report we discuss the use of mechanical circulatory support in cancer patients with drug-induced heart failure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott, Williams andamp; Wilkins, 2014
Keywords
breast cancer; cardiotoxicity; heart failure; mechanical circulatory support; heart transplantation
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113018 (URN)10.1097/MAT.0000000000000138 (DOI)000345299200001 ()25232773 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-01-12 Created: 2015-01-08 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Sundbom, P., Hedayati, E., Peterzén, B., Granfeldt, H., Ahn, H. & Hübbert, L. (2013). Kardiotoxicitet med terminal hjärtsvikt och nästan sex år med Heartmate II i väntan på hjärttransplantation. In: : . Paper presented at Thoraxmötet 2013, 17-18 oktober, Linköping.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kardiotoxicitet med terminal hjärtsvikt och nästan sex år med Heartmate II i väntan på hjärttransplantation
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2013 (Swedish)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-104988 (URN)
Conference
Thoraxmötet 2013, 17-18 oktober, Linköping
Available from: 2014-03-05 Created: 2014-03-05 Last updated: 2015-11-09Bibliographically approved
Casimir Ahn, H., Granfeldt, H., Hübbert, L. & Peterzén, B. (2013). Long-term left ventricular support in patients with a mechanical aortic valve. Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, 47(4), 236-239
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term left ventricular support in patients with a mechanical aortic valve
2013 (English)In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 236-239Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives. The presence of a mechanical prosthesis has been regarded as an increased risk of thromboembolic complications and as a relative contraindication for a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). Five patients in our center had a mechanical aortic valve at the time of device implantation and were studied regarding thromboembolic complications. Design. Five patients operated upon with an LVAD (1 HeartMate I (TM), 4 HeartMate II (TM)) between 2002 and 2011 had a mechanical aortic valve at the time of implantation. The first patient had a patch closure of the aortic valve. In four patients, the prosthesis was left in place. Anticoagulants included aspirin, warfarin, and clopidogrel. Results. The average and accumulated treatment times were 150 and 752 days, respectively. Three of the five patients showed early signs of valve thrombosis on echo with concomitant valve dysfunction. Four patients were transplanted without thromboembolic events during pump treatment. One patient died from a hemorrhagic stroke after 90 days on the LVAD. Conclusions. The strategy of leaving a mechanical heart valve in place at the time of LVAD implantation in five patients led to valvular thrombosis in three but did not provoke embolic events. It increased the complexity of postoperative anticoagulation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
INFORMA HEALTHCARE, TELEPHONE HOUSE, 69-77 PAUL STREET, LONDON EC2A 4LQ, ENGLAND, 2013
Keywords
aortic valve, left ventricular support, mechanical valve
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-96976 (URN)10.3109/14017431.2013.795655 (DOI)000322607700007 ()
Available from: 2013-09-05 Created: 2013-09-02 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Hübbert, L., Jorde, U. P., Peterzén, B., Granfeldt, H., Kornhall, B., Morrison, K. & Ahn, H. C. (2012). Early Results from the SoundMate Study. Acoustic Analysis of a Thromboembolic Event in a Patient Treated with HeartMate II (TM), Mechanical Circulatory Support. Paper presented at 32nd Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions of the International-Society-for-Heart-and-Lung-Transplantation/Meeting of the ISHLT Academy - Core Competencies in Mechanical Circulatory Support, APR 17-21, 2012, Prague, CZECH REPUBLIC. The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation, 31(4 Suppl.), S134-S135
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early Results from the SoundMate Study. Acoustic Analysis of a Thromboembolic Event in a Patient Treated with HeartMate II (TM), Mechanical Circulatory Support
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2012 (English)In: The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation, ISSN 1053-2498, E-ISSN 1557-3117, Vol. 31, no 4 Suppl., p. S134-S135Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2012
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-76942 (URN)10.1016/j.healun.2012.01.388 (DOI)000302207900379 ()
Conference
32nd Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions of the International-Society-for-Heart-and-Lung-Transplantation/Meeting of the ISHLT Academy - Core Competencies in Mechanical Circulatory Support, APR 17-21, 2012, Prague, CZECH REPUBLIC
Available from: 2012-05-02 Created: 2012-04-27 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Lundin, Å., Nyberg, H., Svanberg, C., Hallingbäck, C., Philipsson, S., Kindahl, P., . . . Walther, S. (2012). Hur mår den hjärtopererade patienten ett år efter operationen?. In: : . Paper presented at Thoraxmötet 2012, 10-12 oktober, Göteborg. Göteborg
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hur mår den hjärtopererade patienten ett år efter operationen?
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2012 (Swedish)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg: , 2012
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103380 (URN)
Conference
Thoraxmötet 2012, 10-12 oktober, Göteborg
Available from: 2014-01-19 Created: 2014-01-19 Last updated: 2014-01-31
Ahn, H., Granfeldt, H., Hübbert, L. & Peterzén, B. (2012). Long-term mechanical circulatory support in patients with a prosthetic aortic valve. Paper presented at 4th Joint Scandinavian Conference in Cardiothoracic Surgery, 16-18 August 2012, Vilnius, Lithuania.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term mechanical circulatory support in patients with a prosthetic aortic valve
2012 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-87606 (URN)
Conference
4th Joint Scandinavian Conference in Cardiothoracic Surgery, 16-18 August 2012, Vilnius, Lithuania
Available from: 2013-01-19 Created: 2013-01-19 Last updated: 2013-02-04
Hübbert, L., Peterzén, B., Ahn, H. & Janerot Sjöberg, B. (2010). Second Harmonic Echocardiography and Spontaneous Contrast during Implantation of a left Ventricular Assist Device. ASAIO journal (1992), 56(5), 417-421
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Second Harmonic Echocardiography and Spontaneous Contrast during Implantation of a left Ventricular Assist Device
2010 (English)In: ASAIO journal (1992), ISSN 1058-2916, E-ISSN 1538-943X, Vol. 56, no 5, p. 417-421Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Implantable mechanical left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are used as a bridge or alternative to heart transplantation. Peroperative transesophageal echocardiography is commonly applied during implantation. Significant air embolism may occur as a result of air leakage at connections and anastomoses when LV filling becomes inadequate, and this must be prevented. Early suspicion and detection of air is mandatory to avoid negative circulatory effects. We hypothesized that monitoring of heart chamber size and occurrence of single air bubbles using second harmonic imaging (SHI) echocardiography may prevent risk for significant air embolism. After implantation of the LVAD in 10 calves, invasive hemodynamic monitoring and epicardial SHI were performed while increasing pump speed. Air bubbles in the ascending aorta were monitored and the left heart visualized for off-line dimensional analysis. Detection of air bubbles in the ascending aorta preceded their appearance in the left ventricle. They occurred exclusively but not always after a decrease in left atrial (LA) size. Decrease in LA pressure did not predict bubble detection or reduction in LA size. We conclude that SHI detects spontaneous ultrasound contrast during implantation of a LVAD and that a decrease in LA size is a warning that air embolism is imminent.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2010
National Category
Mathematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-61517 (URN)10.1097/MAT.0b013e3181e9261d (DOI)
Available from: 2010-11-16 Created: 2010-11-16 Last updated: 2017-12-12
Granfeldt, H., Peterzén, B., Hubbert, L., Jansson, K. & Casimir Ahn, H. (2009). A single center experience with the HeartMate II (TM) Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD). Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, 43(6), 360-365
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A single center experience with the HeartMate II (TM) Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD)
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2009 (English)In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 360-365Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives. Left ventricular assist devices (LVAD), used in the setting bridge-to-transplantation and destination therapy, for patients with deteriorating severe heart failure are continuously developing. The second generation, the axial flow pumps, have been introduced since some years. Design. Eleven consecutive patients, seven male, with severe heart failure due to ischemic cardiomyopathy (n = 5), dilated cardiomyopathy (n = 5) and cytotoxic ethiology (n = 1) were implanted with the HeartMate-II (TM). They were preoperatively treated with inotropic support (n = 9), ventricular assist device (n = 2) and mechanical ventilation (n = 4). Results. Eight patients were bridged to transplant after median 155 days (range, 65 to 316 days). One patient is ongoing for 748 days, intended for destination therapy. Ten of eleven patients were discharged after median 64 days (range, 40 to 105 days). Four patients were reoperated due to bleeding. Two embolic events were recorded. One perioperative death. Conclusion. Eleven HM-II (TM) LVADs have been implanted in our institution with good early results. Eight patients were successfully bridged to heart transplantation. One patient is intended for destination therapy and is ongoing since November 2006. In these severely ill patients, this technique offers a good chance surviving until heart transplantation. In selected cases the technique also offers the possibility of a permanent support and longevity.

Keywords
Left ventricular assist; terminal heart failure; bridge to transplantation
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-52868 (URN)10.1080/14017430903019553 (DOI)
Available from: 2010-01-13 Created: 2010-01-12 Last updated: 2017-12-12
Hübbert, L., Peterzén, B., Träff, S., Janerot Sjöberg, B. & Ahn, H. C. (2008). Axial flow pump treatment during myocardial depression in calves: an invasive hemodynamic and echocardiographic tissue Doppler study.. ASAIO journal (1992), 54(4), 367-371
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Axial flow pump treatment during myocardial depression in calves: an invasive hemodynamic and echocardiographic tissue Doppler study.
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2008 (English)In: ASAIO journal (1992), ISSN 1058-2916, E-ISSN 1538-943X, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 367-371Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate flow characteristics and myocardial function after implantation of an axial pump left ventricular assist device while varying afterload and during progressive myocardial depression. Ten calves were included, seven of which fulfilled the protocol. Invasive hemodynamic monitoring and echocardiography with color-coded systolic tissue Doppler velocity (TD velocity) were used during prepump conditions, at three different pump speeds, during modification of the systemic vascular resistance (SVR), and during increasing degrees of beta-blockade. The TD velocity decreased with the myocardial function whereas left ventricular size, fractional shortening, and pump speed did not correlate significantly with the TD velocity. The TD velocity correlated significantly with native stroke volume, heart rate, SVR and cardiac output but none of these alone could explain more than 20% of the changes in TD velocity. The axial flow pump studied is effective in unloading the severely depressed heart and has a high capacity for maintaining an adequate cardiac output, regardless of differing hemodynamic conditions, pump speed or decreasing LV function. Echocardiography with volumetric rendering and TD velocity imaging are valuable tools for monitoring and quantifying residual myocardial function during pump treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Philadelphia, PA USA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2008
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-44738 (URN)10.1097/MAT.0b013e31817fd8de (DOI)000257861700006 ()77509 (Local ID)77509 (Archive number)77509 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13
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