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Lindgren, Per-Eric
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Publications (10 of 77) Show all publications
Wilhelmsson, P., Fryland, L., Lindblom, P., Sjöwall, J., Ahlm, C., Berglund, J., . . . Lindgren, P.-E. (2016). A prospective study on the incidence of Borrelia infection after a tick bite in Sweden and on the Åland Islands, Finland (2008-2009). Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases, 7(1), 71-79
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A prospective study on the incidence of Borrelia infection after a tick bite in Sweden and on the Åland Islands, Finland (2008-2009)
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2016 (English)In: Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases, ISSN 1877-959X, E-ISSN 1877-9603, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 71-79Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lyme borreliosis (LB) is a common and increasing tick-borne disease in Europe. The risk of acquiring a Borrelia infection after a tick bite is not fully known. Therefore, we investigated the incidence of Borrelia infection after a tick bite and if the Borrelia load and/or the duration of tick-feeding influenced the risk of infection. During 2008-2009, ticks and blood samples were collected from 1546 tick-bitten persons from Sweden and the Åland Islands, Finland. Follow-up blood samples were taken three months after the tick bite. The duration of tick feeding was microscopically estimated and Borrelia was detected and quantified in ticks by real-time PCR. Anti-Borrelia antibodies were detected in sera using ELISA assays and immunoblot.

Even though 28 % of the participants were bitten by a Borrelia-positive tick, only 7.5% (32/428) of them developed a Borrelia infection, half of them LB. All who seroconverted removed “their” ticks significantly later than those who did not. The Borrelia load in the ticks did not explain the risk of seroconversion. Regional as well as gender differences in the Borrelia seroprevalence were found. The risk of developing a Borrelia infection after a bite by a Borrelia-infected tick is small but increases with the duration of tick feeding.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato; tick bite; incidence of infection; Lyme borreliosis; asymptomatic infection; bacterial load; tick-feeding.
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105475 (URN)10.1016/j.ttbdis.2015.08.009 (DOI)000366953400012 ()
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council Branch of Medicine [K2008-58X-14631-06-3]; Medical Research Council of South-East Sweden [FORSS-8967, FORSS-12573, FORSS-29021, FORSS-86911]; EU Interreg IV A project ScandTick [167226]; County Council of Ostergotland [LIO-56191];

Available from: 2014-03-25 Created: 2014-03-25 Last updated: 2017-05-03Bibliographically approved
Wilhelmsson, P. & Lindgren, P. E. (2016). Detection of a novel Lyme borreliosis pathogen.. Lancet. Infectious diseases (Print), 16(5), 511-512
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Detection of a novel Lyme borreliosis pathogen.
2016 (English)In: Lancet. Infectious diseases (Print), ISSN 1473-3099, E-ISSN 1474-4457, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 511-512Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126677 (URN)10.1016/S1473-3099(15)00483-1 (DOI)000374272900006 ()26856776 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-01 Created: 2016-04-01 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Andersson, M. O., Bergvall, U. A., Chirico, J., Christensson, M., Lindgren, P.-E., Nordstrom, J. & Kjellander, P. (2016). Molecular detection of Babesia capreoli and Babesia venatorum in wild Swedish roe deer, Capreolus capreolus. Parasites & Vectors, 9(221)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Molecular detection of Babesia capreoli and Babesia venatorum in wild Swedish roe deer, Capreolus capreolus
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2016 (English)In: Parasites & Vectors, ISSN 1756-3305, E-ISSN 1756-3305, Vol. 9, no 221Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The epidemiology of the zoonotic tick-transmitted parasite Babesia spp. and its occurrence in wild reservoir hosts in Sweden is unclear. In European deer, several parasite species, including Babesia capreoli and the zoonotic B. venatorum and B. divergens has been reported previously. The European roe deer, Capreolus capreolus, is an important and common part of the indigenous fauna in Europe, as well as an important host for Ixodes ricinus ticks, the vector of several Babesia spp. in Europe. Here, we aimed to investigate the occurrence of Babesia spp. in roe deer in Sweden. Findings: Roe deer (n = 77) were caught and sampled for blood. Babesia spp. was detected with a PCR assay targeting the 18S rRNA gene. The prevalence of Babesia spp. was 52 %, and two species were detected; B. capreoli and B. venatorum in 44 and 7.8 % of the individuals, respectively. Infection occurred both in summer and winter. Conclusions: We showed that roe deer in Sweden, close to the edge of their northern inland distributional range, are infected with Babesia spp. The occurrence of B. venatorum in roe deer imply that it is established in Sweden and the zoonotic implication of this finding should be regarded to a greater extent in future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BIOMED CENTRAL LTD, 2016
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-128748 (URN)10.1186/s13071-016-1503-8 (DOI)000375038700001 ()27094215 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Lawski foundation (Sven och Lilly Lawskis fond for naturvetenskaplig forskning); Royal Physiographic Society in Lund; Royal Swedish Academy of Agriculture and Forestry [H14-0069-ALF]; Swedish Environmental Protection Agency project; Swedish hunters organization; foundation Marie-Clair Cronstedts stiftelse: RaFast; EU Interreg - ScandTick Innovation

Available from: 2016-05-31 Created: 2016-05-30 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Mernelius, S., Carlsson, E., Henricson, J., Löfgren, S., Lindgren, P.-E., Ehricht, R., . . . Anderson, C. (2016). Staphylococcus aureus colonization related to severity of hand eczema. European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, 35(8), 1355-1361
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Staphylococcus aureus colonization related to severity of hand eczema
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2016 (English)In: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0934-9723, E-ISSN 1435-4373, Vol. 35, no 8, p. 1355-1361Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Knowledge on Staphylococcus aureus colonization rates and epidemiology in hand eczema is limited. The aim of this study was to clarify some of these issues. Samples were collected by the "glove juice" method from the hands of 59 patients with chronic hand eczema and 24 healthy individuals. Swab samples were taken from anterior nares and throat from 43 of the 59 patients and all healthy individuals. S. aureus were spa typed and analysed by DNA-microarray-based genotyping. The extent of the eczema was evaluated by the hand eczema extent score (HEES). The colonization rate was higher on the hands of hand eczema patients (69 %) compared to healthy individuals (21 %, p amp;lt; 0.001). This was also seen for bacterial density (p = 0.002). Patients with severe hand eczema (HEES a parts per thousand yen 13) had a significantly higher S. aureus density on their hands compared to those with milder eczema (HEES = 1 to 12, p = 0.004). There was no difference between patients and healthy individuals regarding colonization rates in anterior nares or throat. spa typing and DNA-microarray-based genotyping indicated certain types more prone to colonize eczematous skin. Simultaneous colonization, in one individual, with S. aureus of different types, was identified in 60-85 % of the study subjects. The colonization rate and density indicate a need for effective treatment of eczema and may have an impact on infection control in healthcare.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130833 (URN)10.1007/s10096-016-2672-2 (DOI)000380089800017 ()27193891 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden; Futurum - the Academy of Healthcare, County Council, Jonkoping; Medeca Pharma AB, Uppsala

Available from: 2016-08-26 Created: 2016-08-26 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Aase, A., Hajdusek, O., Oines, O., Quarsten, H., Wilhelmsson, P., Herstad, T. K., . . . Aaberge, I. S. (2016). Validate or falsify: Lessons learned from a microscopy method claimed to be useful for detecting Borrelia and Babesia organisms in human blood. INFECTIOUS DISEASES, 48(6), 411-419
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validate or falsify: Lessons learned from a microscopy method claimed to be useful for detecting Borrelia and Babesia organisms in human blood
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2016 (English)In: INFECTIOUS DISEASES, ISSN 2374-4235, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 411-419Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background A modified microscopy protocol (the LM-method) was used to demonstrate what was interpreted as Borrelia spirochetes and later also Babesia sp., in peripheral blood from patients. The method gained much publicity, but was not validated prior to publication, which became the purpose of this study using appropriate scientific methodology, including a control group. Methods Blood from 21 patients previously interpreted as positive for Borrelia and/or Babesia infection by the LM-method and 41 healthy controls without known history of tick bite were collected, blinded and analysed for these pathogens by microscopy in two laboratories by the LM-method and conventional method, respectively, by PCR methods in five laboratories and by serology in one laboratory. Results Microscopy by the LM-method identified structures claimed to be Borrelia- and/or Babesia in 66% of the blood samples of the patient group and in 85% in the healthy control group. Microscopy by the conventional method for Babesia only did not identify Babesia in any samples. PCR analysis detected Borrelia DNA in one sample of the patient group and in eight samples of the control group; whereas Babesia DNA was not detected in any of the blood samples using molecular methods. Conclusions The structures interpreted as Borrelia and Babesia by the LM-method could not be verified by PCR. The method was, thus, falsified. This study underlines the importance of doing proper test validation before new or modified assays are introduced.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2016
Keywords
Lyme disease; Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato; babesiosis; Babesia spp.; Lyme borreliosis; PCR; microscopy
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127739 (URN)10.3109/23744235.2016.1144931 (DOI)000373810800001 ()27030913 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Grant Agency of the Czech Republic [13-27630P, 13-12816P]; EU FP7 project MODBIOLIN [316304]; Interreg IV A project ScandTick

Available from: 2016-05-12 Created: 2016-05-12 Last updated: 2016-05-12
Labbe Sandelin, L., Tolf, C., Larsson, S., Wilhelmsson, P., Salaneck, E., Jaenson, T. G. T., . . . Waldenstrom, J. (2015). Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis in Ticks from Migrating Birds in Sweden. PLoS ONE, 10(7), e0133250
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis in Ticks from Migrating Birds in Sweden
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2015 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 7, p. e0133250-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis (CNM; family Anaplasmataceae) was recently recognized as a potential tick-borne human pathogen. The presence of CNM in mammals, in host-seeking Ixodes ticks and in ticks attached to mammals and birds has been reported recently. We investigated the presence of CNM in ornithophagous ticks from migrating birds. A total of 1,150 ticks (582 nymphs, 548 larvae, 18 undetermined ticks and two adult females) collected from 5,365 birds captured in south-eastern Sweden was screened for CNM by molecular methods. The birds represented 65 different species, of which 35 species were infested with one or more ticks. Based on a combination of morphological and molecular species identification, the majority of the ticks were identified as Ixodes ricinus. Samples were initially screened by real-time PCR targeting the CNM 16S rRNA gene, and confirmed by a second real-time PCR targeting the groEL gene. For positive samples, a 1260 base pair fragment of the 16S rRNA gene was sequenced. Based upon bacterial gene sequence identification, 2.1% (24/1150) of the analysed samples were CNM-positive. Twenty-two out of 24 CNM-positive ticks were molecularly identified as I. ricinus nymphs, and the remaining two were identified as I. ricinus based on morphology. The overall CNM prevalence in I. ricinus nymphs was 4.2%. None of the 548 tested larvae was positive. CNM-positive ticks were collected from 10 different bird species. The highest CNM-prevalences were recorded in nymphs collected from common redpoll (Carduelis flammea, 3/7), thrush nightingale (Luscinia luscinia, 2/29) and dunnock (Prunella modularis, 1/17). The 16S rRNA sequences obtained in this study were all identical to each other and to three previously reported European strains, two of which were obtained from humans. It is concluded that ornithophagous ticks may be infected with CNM and that birds most likely can disperse CNM-infected ticks over large geographical areas.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2015
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120741 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0133250 (DOI)000358622000071 ()26207834 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden [FORSS-307591, FORSS-387231]; Carl Tryggers Foundation for Scientific Research; Langmanska kulturfonden; Magnus Bergvalls Foundation for Scientific Research; Helge Ax:son Johnsons Foundation; EU Interreg IVA project ScandTick

Available from: 2015-08-24 Created: 2015-08-24 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Grankvist, A., Labbe Sandelin, L., Andersson, J., Fryland, L., Wilhelmsson, P., Lindgren, P.-E., . . . Wenneras, C. (2015). Infections with Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis and Cytokine Responses in 2 Persons Bitten by Ticks, Sweden. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 21(8), 1462-1465
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Infections with Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis and Cytokine Responses in 2 Persons Bitten by Ticks, Sweden
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2015 (English)In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 1462-1465Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The prevalence of Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis infection was determined in 102 persons bitten by ticks in Sweden. Two infected women had erythematous rashes; 1 was co-infected with a Borrelia sp., and the other showed seroconversion for Anaplasma phagocytophilum. Both patients had increased levels of Neoehrlichia DNA and serum cytokines for several months.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2015
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120731 (URN)10.3201/eid2108.150060 (DOI)000358458300031 ()26197035 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|ALF-Goteborg [71580]; Cancer and Allergy Foundation [149781]; Vastra Gotaland Region Research and Development [94510]; Laboratory Medicine at Sahlgrenska University Hospital [6333]; Medical Research Council of South-East Sweden [FORSS-297311, FORSS-307591, FORSS-87231]; Swedish Research Council/Medicine [2011-345]; ALF-Ostergotland

Available from: 2015-08-24 Created: 2015-08-24 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Henningsson, A. J., Wilhelmsson, P., Gyllemark, P., Kozak Ljunggren, M., Matussek, A., Nyman, D., . . . Forsberg, P. (2015). Low risk of seroconversion or clinical disease in humans after a bite by an Anaplasma phagocytophilum-infected tick. Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases, 6(6), 787-792
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Low risk of seroconversion or clinical disease in humans after a bite by an Anaplasma phagocytophilum-infected tick
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2015 (English)In: Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases, ISSN 1877-959X, E-ISSN 1877-9603, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 787-792Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The risk of contracting human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) after a tick bite is mainly unknown. In this study we investigated the clinical and serological response in 30 humans bitten by ticks positive for Anaplasma phagocytophilum (Group A), 30 humans bitten by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.)-positive ticks (Group B), and 30 humans bitten by ticks negative for both A. phagocytophilum and B. burgdorferi s.l. (Group C). Ticks, blood samples and questionnaires were collected from tick-bitten humans at 34 primary healthcare centres in Sweden and in the Åland Islands, Finland, at the time of the tick bite and after three months. A total of 2553 ticks detached from humans in 2007-2009 were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction, and 31 (1.2%) were positive for A. phagocytophilum, 556 (21.8%) were positive for B. burgdorferi s.l., and eight (0.3%) were co-infected by A. phagocytophilum and B. burgdorferi s.l. The overall prevalence of Anaplasma IgG antibodies in the included participants (n=90) was 17%, and there was no significant difference between the groups A-C. Only one of the participants (in Group C) showed a four-fold increase of IgG antibodies against A. phagocytophilum at the three-month follow-up, but reported no symptoms. The frequency of reported symptoms did not differ between groups A-C, and was unrelated to the findings of A. phagocytophilum and B. burgdorferi s.l. in the detached ticks. We conclude that the risk for HGA or asymptomatic seroconversion after a tick bite in Sweden or in the Åland Islands is low, even if the tick is infected by A. phagocytophilum.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122245 (URN)10.1016/j.ttbdis.2015.07.005 (DOI)000362143800015 ()26187418 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding text: Swedish Research Council; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS); Futurum Academy of Healthcare; Jonkoping County Council; Interreg IV A Programme ScandTick; Division of Medical Services, Ryhov County Hospital, Jonkoping

Available from: 2015-10-26 Created: 2015-10-26 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Sokolova, E., Petterson, S. R., Dienus, O., Nyström, F., Lindgren, P.-E. & Pettersson, T. J. R. (2015). Microbial risk assessment of drinking water based on hydrodynamic modelling of pathogen concentrations in source water. Science of the Total Environment, 526, 177-186
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microbial risk assessment of drinking water based on hydrodynamic modelling of pathogen concentrations in source water
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2015 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 526, p. 177-186Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Norovirus contamination of drinking water sources is an important cause of waterborne disease outbreaks. Knowledge on pathogen concentrations in source water is needed to assess the ability of a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) to provide safe drinking water. However, pathogen enumeration in source water samples is often not sufficient to describe the source water quality. In this study, the norovirus concentrations were characterised at the contamination source, i.e. in sewage discharges. Then, the transport of norovirus within the water source (the river Gota alv in Sweden) under different loading conditions was simulated using a hydrodynamic model. Based on the estimated concentrations in source water, the required reduction of norovirus at the DWTP was calculated using quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA). The required reduction was compared with the estimated treatment performance at the DWTP. The average estimated concentration in source water varied between 4.8 x 10(2) and 7.5 x 10(3) genome equivalents L-1; and the average required reduction by treatment was between 7.6 and 8.8 Log(10). The treatment performance at the DWTP was estimated to be adequate to deal with all tested loading conditions, but was heavily dependent on chlorine disinfection, with the risk of poor reduction by conventional treatment and slow sand filtration. To our knowledge, this is the first article to employ discharge-based QMRA, combined with hydrodynamic modelling, in the context of drinking water. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Water quality modelling; Norovirus; Quantitative microbial risk assessment; QMRA; Discharge-based QMRA
National Category
Water Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120205 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.04.040 (DOI)000356224100017 ()25931024 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Graduate School on Environment and Health (Forskarskolan Miljo och Halsa) [RUN 612-0283-13]; Chalmers University of Technology; University of Gothenburg; Region Vastra Gotaland, Sweden; European Union project VISK (Interreg IV A programme) [00148715]; Swedish Water and Wastewater Association (Svenskt Vatten) [SVU 45-11]

Available from: 2015-07-21 Created: 2015-07-20 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Generó, M. M., Juottonen, H., Robroek, B. J. .., Yrjälä, K., Danielsson, Å., Lindgren, P.-E. & Svensson, B. (2015). Nitrogen and methanogen community composition within and among three Sphagnum dominated peatlands in Scandinavia. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 81, 204-211
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nitrogen and methanogen community composition within and among three Sphagnum dominated peatlands in Scandinavia
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2015 (English)In: Soil Biology and Biochemistry, ISSN 0038-0717, E-ISSN 1879-3428, Vol. 81, p. 204-211Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ombrotrophic raised bogs are nutrient poor acidic peatlands accumulating organic matter. They are widely spread on northern latitudes and are substantial sources of methane emissions to the atmosphere being of great concern from a climate change perspective. We investigated the methanogen community composition along microtopographic gradients within three bogs in Scandinavia, receiving different amounts of nitrogen precipitation. Methanogenic community analyses by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism of the mcrA gene showed different profiles among the three sites, while no in- fluence of the microtopographic gradients was observed. Peat temperature and dissolved organic carbon were the major edaphic variables explaining 38% of the variation of the methanogenic community di- versity among the bogs. The family Methanoregulaceae (hydrogenotrophic methanogens) showed the largest relative proportion and highest activity in all three sites. Quantitative PCR of the mcrA gene and transcripts showed that the most northern site, receiving the lowest atmospheric nitrogen load, had significantly lower abundance and activity of methanogens (4.7 106 and 2.4 104 mcrA copies per gram of soil, respectively), compared to the most southern site (8.2 107 and 4.6 105 mcrA copies per gram of soil, respectively), receiving the highest nitrogen load. No patterns of the mcrA gene and tran- script abundances were observed along the microtopography. The results indicated that the difference in occurrence of methanogens is mainly due to geoclimatological conditions rather than site intrinsic microtopographic variation. The study further suggests that environmental changes on the site intrinsic topography will not affect the methanogenic activity, while increasing average temperatures in Scan- dinavian ombrotrophic raised bogs might contribute to an increase of the methanogenic archaeal activity resulting in an increase of methane production. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Methanogenic arhcaea, mcrA gene, peatland, microtopography, T-RFLP, qPCR
National Category
Ecology Microbiology Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113846 (URN)10.1016/j.soilbio.2014.11.016 (DOI)000350524700024 ()
Available from: 2015-02-02 Created: 2015-02-02 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
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