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Jungert, Tomas
Publications (10 of 49) Show all publications
Jungert, T., Landry, R., Joussemet, M., Mageau, G., Gingras, I. & Koestner, R. (2015). Autonomous and Controlled Motivation for Parenting: Associations with Parent and Child Outcomes. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 24(7), 1932-1942
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Autonomous and Controlled Motivation for Parenting: Associations with Parent and Child Outcomes
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, ISSN 1062-1024, E-ISSN 1573-2843, Vol. 24, no 7, p. 1932-1942Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present investigation examined motivation for parenting and some of its correlates in parents and children. The data came from samples of 151 first-time mothers of infants, 153 mothers of middle school children, and 260 mothers and fathers of high school children. Parents provided self-report data about their motivation in their parenting role as well as reports of role satisfaction, parental competence, child temperament, and parenting styles. Using three samples, factor analyses confirmed the distinction between autonomous and controlled forms of parenting motivation. Autonomous motivation refers to investing in the parenting role because it is interesting and meaningful whereas controlled motivation refers to investment based on external or internal pressures. Results showed that autonomous motivation was associated concurrently with parenting satisfaction and competence as well as with authoritative and autonomy-supportive parenting styles. Child temperament was unrelated to parenting motivation, but mothers reported greater autonomous motivation for girls than boys and for younger children rather than older children. Autonomous parenting motivation was associated with children reporting autonomy supportive parenting and high levels of well-being. A prospective analysis showed that controlled parenting motivation in first time mothers was associated with reductions in parenting satisfaction as infants became toddlers. A similar analysis showed that autonomous parenting motivation was associated with children developing fewer behavior problems whereas controlled motivation was associated with children developing more behavioral problems. The present findings highlight the heuristic value of assessing why parents invest themselves in the parenting role.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Verlag (Germany), 2015
Keywords
Motivation for parenting; Role satisfaction; Parental competence; Child temperament; Parenting style
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-119785 (URN)10.1007/s10826-014-9993-5 (DOI)000355804100006 ()
Available from: 2015-06-26 Created: 2015-06-26 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Jungert, T. & Koestner, R. (2015). Science adjustment, parental and teacher autonomy support and the cognitive orientation of science students. Educational Psychology, 35(3), 361-376
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Science adjustment, parental and teacher autonomy support and the cognitive orientation of science students
2015 (English)In: Educational Psychology, ISSN 0144-3410, E-ISSN 1469-5820, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 361-376Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research has shown that autonomy support has positive effects on academic development, but no study has examined how systemising cognitive orientation is related to important outcomes for science students, and how it may interact with autonomy support. This prospective investigation considered how systemising and support from teachers and parents influence motivation, self-efficacy and science performance of science students. Totally, two hundred and eighty eight high school students (143 females and 145 males) completed surveys at two times and records of their achievements were collected. Teachers autonomy support and systemising were significantly positively related to motivation, self-efficacy and achievement over time, while parental support for autonomy was not directly related to the outcomes. Finally, two significant interaction effects showed that the relation of parental autonomy support to motivation and self-efficacy was moderated by systemising. This is the first study to demonstrate that autonomy support may be especially helpful for individuals with an intrinsic disposition in a domain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor and Francis (Routledge): SSH Titles, 2015
Keywords
self-efficacy; parental autonomy support; motivation; science students; teacher autonomy support; systemising cognitive orientation
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117645 (URN)10.1080/01443410.2013.828826 (DOI)000352848000006 ()
Available from: 2015-05-12 Created: 2015-05-06 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Jungert, T., Hesser, H. & Träff, U. (2014). Contrasting two models of academic self-efficacy - domain-specific versus cross-domain - in children receiving and not receiving special instruction in mathematics. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 55(5), 440-447
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contrasting two models of academic self-efficacy - domain-specific versus cross-domain - in children receiving and not receiving special instruction in mathematics
2014 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 440-447Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In social cognitive theory, self-efficacy is domain-specific. An alternative model, the cross-domain influence model, would predict that self-efficacy beliefs in one domain might influence performance in other domains. Research has also found that children who receive special instruction are not good at estimating their performance. The aim was to test two models of how self-efficacy beliefs influence achievement, and to contrast children receiving special instruction in mathematics with normally-achieving children. The participants were 73 fifth-grade children who receive special instruction and 70 children who do not receive any special instruction. In year four and five, the childrens skills in mathematics and reading were assessed by national curriculum tests, and in their fifth year, self-efficacy in mathematics and reading were measured. Structural equation modeling showed that in domains where children do not receive special instruction in mathematics, self-efficacy is a mediating variable between earlier and later achievement in the same domain. Achievement in mathematics was not mediated by self-efficacy in mathematics for children who receive special instruction. For normal achieving children, earlier achievement in the language domain had an influence on later self-efficacy in the mathematics domain, and self-efficacy beliefs in different domains were correlated. Self-efficacy is mostly domain specific, but may play a different role in academic performance depending on whether children receive special instruction. The results of the present study provided some support of the Cross-Domain Influence Model for normal achieving children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley: 24 months, 2014
Keywords
Self-efficacy; mathematics; special instruction; learning difficulties
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111447 (URN)10.1111/sjop.12139 (DOI)000341908300006 ()24952956 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-10-21 Created: 2014-10-17 Last updated: 2018-12-12
Jungert, T., Alm, F. & Thornberg, R. (2014). Motives for becoming a teacher and their relations to academic engagement and dropout among student teachers. Journal of Education for Teaching, 40(2), 173-185
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Motives for becoming a teacher and their relations to academic engagement and dropout among student teachers
2014 (English)In: Journal of Education for Teaching, ISSN 0260-7476, E-ISSN 1360-0540, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 173-185Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Difficulties in attracting student teachers have resulted in research focusing on student teachers motives for studying to join the profession. Because previous findings are mixed, the first aim of this study was to explore motives for students to become teachers. A second aim was to explore the relationship between teachers motives and their academic engagement and dropout rates at the end of their studies. A sample of 333 student teachers at a Swedish university completed a questionnaire measuring motives for becoming a teacher and their academic engagement. The best model of a confirmatory factor analyses defined three motivational factors as altruistic, intrinsic and extrinsic motives. A path analysis showed a negative significant relationship between the altruistic motive and dropout, mediated by academic engagement, whereas the relationships between intrinsic and extrinsic motives and academic engagement were not significant.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor and Francis (Routledge): SSH Titles, 2014
Keywords
job motives; student teachers; academic engagement; dropout
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-104278 (URN)10.1080/02607476.2013.869971 (DOI)000329920700007 ()
Available from: 2014-02-17 Created: 2014-02-14 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Alm, F., Jungert, T. & Thornberg, R. (2014). Nyantagna lärarstudenters motiv, motivation, självtillit och akademiska engagemang. Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nyantagna lärarstudenters motiv, motivation, självtillit och akademiska engagemang
2014 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Det första studieåret vid universitet eller högskola har visat sig utgöra en kritisk period för nya studenter och en stor del av alla avhopp sker under den här perioden. Forskning har visat att hög studiemotivation, självtillit och högt akademiskt engagemang hos studenter predicerar goda studieresultat och motverkar avhopp.

I den här rapporten redogör vi för en studie av nyantagna lä-rarstudenters motiv för studieval, akademiska självtillit, studiemo-tivation och akademiska engagemang. I rapporten beskrivs även relationerna mellan dessa variabler och deras koppling till kön och lärarkategori. Studieavhopp analyseras i relation till kön, lärarkategori och studenternas initiala motiv för att läsa till lärare. En central teoribildning som forskningsprojektet utgår ifrån är teorin om själv-beslutsamhet (”self-determination theory”). Urvalet utgörs av stu-denter vid Linköpings universitet som avser att studera till grundskol- och gymnasielärare. Data har samlats in med enkäter och bearbetats med deskriptiv och analytisk statistisk.

Av resultaten framgår att studenterna rapporterar att de i första hand har valt att läsa till lärare till följd av altruistiska och inre skäl, och att de i högre grad motiveras av autonom motivation än kontrollerad motivation i sina studier. De blivande lärarna i grundskolans senare år och gymnasiet (senarelärare) uppvisade en högre akademisk självtillit än de blivande lärarna i grundskolans tidigare år (tidigarelärare). För akademiskt engagemang var resul-tatet det omvända. Medelvärdena för självbeslutsamhet, akademisk självtillit och akademiskt engagemang i studien är dock inte högre än att det finns utrymme för att försöka höja dem för kommande kohorter av lärarstudenter. Andelen avhopp bland lärarstudenterna som ingår i studien ligger på drygt 40%. Andelen avhopp var större för senarelärarna än för tidigarelärarna. Resultaten visar också att altruistiska motiv bakom valet att studera till lärare sammanhänger med en lägre benägenhet till avhopp via akademiskt engagemang som medierande variabel. Avslutningsvis diskuteras pedagogiska implikationer av studien för lärarutbildningen.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2014. p. 48
Series
LiU-PEK-R / Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning (2007-) ; 261
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105513 (URN)9789175193847 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-03-25 Created: 2014-03-25 Last updated: 2016-09-28Bibliographically approved
Thornberg, R. & Jungert, T. (2014). School bullying and the mechanisms of moral disengagement. Aggressive Behavior, 40(2), 99-108
Open this publication in new window or tab >>School bullying and the mechanisms of moral disengagement
2014 (English)In: Aggressive Behavior, ISSN 0096-140X, E-ISSN 1098-2337, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 99-108Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the present study was to examine to what degree different mechanisms of moral disengagement were related to age, gender, bullying, and defending among school children. Three hundred and seventy-two Swedish children ranging in age from 10 to 14 years completed a questionnaire. Findings revealed that boys expressed significantly higher levels of moral justification, euphemistic labeling, diffusion of responsibility, distorting consequences, and victim attribution, as compared with girls. Whereas boys bullied others significantly more often than girls, age was unrelated to bullying. Moral justification and victim attribution were the only dimensions of moral disengagement that significantly related to bullying. Furthermore, younger children and girls were more likely to defend victims. Diffusion of responsibility and victim attribution were significantly and negatively related to defending, while the other dimensions of moral disengagement were unrelated to defending.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2014
Keywords
bullying, moral disengagement, defending, moral cognition, mobbning, moraliskt disengagemang, moralisk kognition
National Category
Pedagogy Psychology Social Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105637 (URN)10.1002/ab.21509 (DOI)000331255700001 ()
Available from: 2014-03-31 Created: 2014-03-31 Last updated: 2017-10-04
Thornberg, R. & Jungert, T. (2013). Bystander behavior in bullying situations: basic moral sensitivity, moral disengagement and defender self-efficacy. Journal of Adolescence, 36(3), 475-483
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bystander behavior in bullying situations: basic moral sensitivity, moral disengagement and defender self-efficacy
2013 (English)In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 475-483Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the present study was to investigate how basic moral sensitivity in bullying, moral disengagement in bullying and defender self-efficacy were related to different bystander behaviors in bullying. Therefore, we examined pathways that linked students' basic moral sensitivity, moral disengagement, and defender self-efficacy to different bystander behaviors in bullying situations. Three hundred and forty-seven teenagers completed a bullying survey. Findings indicated that compared with boys, girls expressed higher basic moral sensitivity in bullying, lower defender self-efficacy and moral disengagement in bullying. Results from the SEM showed that basic moral sensitivity in bullying was negatively related to pro-bully behavior and positively related to outsider and defender behavior, mediated by moral disengagement in bullying, which in turn was positively related to pro-bully behavior and negatively related to outsider and defender behavior. What differed in the relations between outsider and defender behaviors was the degree of defender self-efficacy.

Keywords
Bullying, Bystander, Defender, Moral disengagement, Self-efficacy, Moral, mobbning, åskådare, försvarare, moral, etik, självtillit, värdegrund, moraliskt disengagemang
National Category
Pedagogy Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Social Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-91057 (URN)10.1016/j.adolescence.2013.02.003 (DOI)000320350700005 ()
Available from: 2013-04-13 Created: 2013-04-13 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Jungert, T., Frank Koestner, R., Houlfort, N. & Schattke, K. (2013). Distinguishing Source of Autonomy Support in Relation to Workers Motivation and Self-Efficacy. Journal of Social Psychology, 153(6), 651-666
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distinguishing Source of Autonomy Support in Relation to Workers Motivation and Self-Efficacy
2013 (English)In: Journal of Social Psychology, ISSN 0022-4545, E-ISSN 1940-1183, Vol. 153, no 6, p. 651-666Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose was to investigate the relationship between autonomy support by managers and co-workers and employees work motivation and self-efficacy in two studies. In Study 1, a sample of 343 Swedish workers completed surveys, and in Study 2, we followed up with a subsample of 98 workers one year later. As in previous studies, managers support of autonomy was significantly positively related to workers outcomes. However, the results of Study 1 also showed that co-worker autonomy support was related to these outcomes over and above the effects of manager support. Study 2 showed that changes in autonomy support from co-workers during one year significantly predicted motivation and self-efficacy one year later, while change in support from managers was unrelated to outcomes later. These findings provide evidence for the importance of both vertical and horizontal sources of support.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor and Francis (Routledge): STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Titles, 2013
Keywords
co-worker support, manager support, self-efficacy, team, work motivation
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-100301 (URN)10.1080/00224545.2013.806292 (DOI)000324851300002 ()
Available from: 2013-11-04 Created: 2013-11-04 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Jungert, T. & Vongas, J. (2013). No work is motivating if the climate lacks warmth: The importance of autonomy supportive coworkers and managers in elderly care. In: : . Paper presented at 5th International Conference on Self-Determination Theory, 27-30 June 2013, Rochester, NY, USA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>No work is motivating if the climate lacks warmth: The importance of autonomy supportive coworkers and managers in elderly care
2013 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this research was to investigate how elderly caregivers perceive support from their managers and caregivers and how these perceptions contribute to their individual work motivation and team performance. Data were collected from two samples; study 1 involved qualitative interviews with 12 caregivers and social workers for the elderly and study 2 had 238 elderly caregivers complete a questionnaire. Results indicated that supportive managers and caregivers helped create a warm work climate that positively influenced motivation, whereas uninvolved managers and rigorous regulations led to a controlling climate that restrained employee self-development and motivation. In addition, managers and coworkers differently satisfied caregivers’ basic needs for competence, autonomy, and relatedness, all of which related to various degrees to motivation and perceptions of team quality. These findings are valuable for organizations wishing to develop and optimize successful climates and work teams for elderly caregivers in societies with highly aging populations.

Keywords
motivation, support, caregivers, managers, co-workers
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-97356 (URN)
Conference
5th International Conference on Self-Determination Theory, 27-30 June 2013, Rochester, NY, USA
Available from: 2013-09-10 Created: 2013-09-10 Last updated: 2013-09-16
Jungert, T. & Andersson, U. (2013). Self-efficacy Beliefs in Mathematics, Native Language Literacy and Foreign Language Amongst Boys and Girls with and without Mathematic Difficulties. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, 57(1), 1-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-efficacy Beliefs in Mathematics, Native Language Literacy and Foreign Language Amongst Boys and Girls with and without Mathematic Difficulties
2013 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim was to examine achievement and self-efficacy in mathematics and native and foreign language literacy in children with specific mathematic LD (MD-only), children with comorbid mathematic and reading difficulties (MD-RD), and compare them with children without LD (controls), as well as to explore gender differences. Participants were 143 fifth-graders in Sweden who completed National Tests and measures of self-efficacy in mathematics and literacy. The MD-RD children displayed lower self-efficacy in all subjects compared to the controls, even when controlling for achievement. The MD-only children displayed lower self-efficacy in mathematics, completely accounted for by their lower mathematic achievement. The lower self-efficacy for children with learning disabilities may primarily be explained by their history of low achievement interpreted as failures and their emphasis on negative appraisals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2013
Keywords
academic self-efficacy, mathematical difficulties, comorbid mathematical and reading difficulties, school children
National Category
Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-88663 (URN)10.1080/00313831.2011.621140 (DOI)000313671900001 ()
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2003-0158
Available from: 2013-02-14 Created: 2013-02-14 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
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