liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 53) Show all publications
Alfredson, J., Johansson, B., Gonzaga Trabasso, L., Schminder, J., Granlund, R. & Gårdhagen, R. (2018). DESIGN OF A DISTRIBUTED HUMAN FACTORS LABORATORY FOR FUTURE AIRSYSTEMS. In: ICAS congress proceeding: . Paper presented at 31st Congress of the International Council of the Aeronautical Sciences,Belo Horizonte, Brazil, September 9-14, 2018. International Council of the Aeronautical Sciences, Article ID ICAS2018_0305.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>DESIGN OF A DISTRIBUTED HUMAN FACTORS LABORATORY FOR FUTURE AIRSYSTEMS
Show others...
2018 (English)In: ICAS congress proceeding, International Council of the Aeronautical Sciences , 2018, article id ICAS2018_0305Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper presents a rationale for structuring a distributed human factors laboratory for future air systems. The distributed herein refers to two aspects: content and geographic. As for content, the laboratory is structured in two levels, namely, individual, and team. As for geographic, the laboratory infrastructure is distributed in three physically separate facilities, namely, Department of Computer and Information Science (IDA) and Department of Management and Engineering (IEI) from Linköping University – Sweden and the Competence Center in Manufacturing from the Aeronautics Institute of Technology (ITA) – Brazil.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Council of the Aeronautical Sciences, 2018
Keywords
Human Factors; Future Air Systems; Laboratory
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-152898 (URN)978-3-932182-88-4 (ISBN)
Conference
31st Congress of the International Council of the Aeronautical Sciences,Belo Horizonte, Brazil, September 9-14, 2018
Available from: 2018-11-27 Created: 2018-11-27 Last updated: 2018-11-27
van Laere, J., Berggren, P., Larsson, A., Olsson, L., Johansson, B. & Gustavsson, P. (2017). Analyzing the implications of design choices in existing simulation-games for critical infrastructure resilience. In: International Simulation and Gaming Association’s conference (ISAGA) 2017: . Paper presented at International Simulation and Gaming Association’s conference (ISAGA), Delft, Netherlands, 10-14 July 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analyzing the implications of design choices in existing simulation-games for critical infrastructure resilience
Show others...
2017 (English)In: International Simulation and Gaming Association’s conference (ISAGA) 2017, 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-141855 (URN)
Conference
International Simulation and Gaming Association’s conference (ISAGA), Delft, Netherlands, 10-14 July 2017
Available from: 2017-10-10 Created: 2017-10-10 Last updated: 2017-11-07Bibliographically approved
Berggren, P., Johansson, B. & Baroutsi, N. (2017). Assessing the quality of Shared Priorities in teams using content analysis in a microworld experiment. Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science, 18(2), 128-146
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing the quality of Shared Priorities in teams using content analysis in a microworld experiment
2017 (English)In: Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science, ISSN 1463-922X, E-ISSN 1464-536X, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 128-146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective, easy to use, and easy to comprehend assessment methods for measuring shared understanding in teams are hard to find. This paper describes an experiment where a measure called Shared Priorities, which is based on ranking of self-generated strategic items, is assessed. Trained teams were compared to non-trained teams in a dynamic problem-solving task. The maturity of the participating teams was also assessed using a content analysis measure. The Shared Priorities measure was used alongside other well-documented measures of team awareness based on self-rating. Results show that the Shared Priorities measure correlates with task performance and could also distinguish between trained and non-trained teams. However, the Shared Priorities measure did not correlate with the other team measures (cf. CARS – Crew Awareness Rating Scale – and DATMA – Distributed Assessment of Team Mutual Awareness), suggesting that it captures a different quality of teamwork than the self-rating measures. Further, the Shared Priorities measure was found to be easily administered.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
Shared Priorities, CARS, team, microworld, DATMA, shared understanding, mixed design MANOVA
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-141761 (URN)10.1080/1463922X.2016.1159354 (DOI)2-s2.0-84961210979 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-05 Created: 2017-10-05 Last updated: 2019-01-09Bibliographically approved
van Laere, J., Berggren, P., Gustavsson, P., Ibrahim, O., Johansson, B., Larsson, A., . . . Wiberg, C. (2017). Challenges for critical infrastructure reslience: cascading effects of payment system disruptions. In: Tina Comes, Frederick Benaben, Chihab Hamachi, Matthieu Lauras and Auriel Montarna (Ed.), Proceedings May 21-24, 2017 ISCRAM 2017: Agility is comming Mines Albi.. Paper presented at 14th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Respons And Management, May 21-24, (pp. 281-292). Albi: ISCRAM SOCIETY, 14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenges for critical infrastructure reslience: cascading effects of payment system disruptions
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Proceedings May 21-24, 2017 ISCRAM 2017: Agility is comming Mines Albi. / [ed] Tina Comes, Frederick Benaben, Chihab Hamachi, Matthieu Lauras and Auriel Montarna, Albi: ISCRAM SOCIETY , 2017, Vol. 14, p. 281-292Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Critical infrastructures become more and more entangled and rely extensively on information technology. A deeper insight into the relationships between critical infrastructures enables the actors involved to more quickly understand the severity of information technology disruptions and to identify robust cross-functional mitigating actions. This study illustrates how and why disruptions in the payment system in Sweden could create cascading effects in other critical infrastructures with potentially severe consequences for many citizens, government institutions and companies. Data from document studies, interviews and workshops with field experts reveal seven challenges for collective cross-functional critical infrastructure resilience that need to be dealt with: 1) Shortage of food, fuel, cash, medicine; 2) Limited capacity of alternative payment solutions; 3) Cities are more vulnerable than the countryside; 4) Economically vulnerable groups in society are more severely affected; 5) Trust maintenance needs; 6) Crisis communication needs; 7) Fragmentation of responsibility for critical infrastructures across many actors. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Albi: ISCRAM SOCIETY, 2017
Series
Proceedings of the International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management, ISSN 2411-3387 ; 14
Keywords
Critical infrastructures, resilience, collective resilience, payment system.
National Category
Civil Engineering Other Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-141767 (URN)
Conference
14th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Respons And Management, May 21-24,
Available from: 2017-10-05 Created: 2017-10-05 Last updated: 2017-10-10Bibliographically approved
Johansson, B. & Lundberg, J. (2017). Resilience and the temporal dimension: the chimera of timely response. Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science, 18(2), 110-127
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resilience and the temporal dimension: the chimera of timely response
2017 (English)In: Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science, ISSN 1463-922X, E-ISSN 1464-536X, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 110-127Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper presents a framework for reasoning about ‘timely response’, and control versus the temporal organisation of a controlling system. By three empirical examples, we show how a controlling system can be described in terms of perception points, decision points and action points. Our conclusions are that (1) temporal expectancies shape our ability to exercise control at least as much our ability to understand relations and causality, but temporality is rarely part of approaches to modelling human or system performance, (2) temporal organisation of activities shape our ability to exercise control, (3) by utilising the temporal control framework, we can describe important properties of the temporal organisation of a socio-technical system, and (4) the capacity of modelling is limited to what can be known or imagined. Therefore, models describing resilience or stability should include temporality and be based on frameworks generic enough to be applied to a wide variety of situations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
Resilience engineering, time, temporal expectancies, temporal organisation, decision-making
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-141762 (URN)10.1080/1463922X.2016.1154231 (DOI)2-s2.0-84961215740 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-05 Created: 2017-10-05 Last updated: 2019-01-09Bibliographically approved
Prytz, E. G., Rybing, J., Jonson, C.-O., Petterson, A., Berggren, P. & Johansson, B. (2015). An exploratory study of a low-level shared awareness measure using mission-critical locations during an emergency exercise. In: Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 59th Annual Meeting: . Paper presented at Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 59th Annual Meeting (pp. 1152-1156). Sage Publications, 59(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An exploratory study of a low-level shared awareness measure using mission-critical locations during an emergency exercise
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 59th Annual Meeting, Sage Publications, 2015, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 1152-1156Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A shared awareness of other teams’ roles and tasks has been linked to successful performance in joint ventures. However, emergency management organizations responding to incidents do not always share critical information necessary for maintaining shared awareness. An instrument called Shared Priorities has previously been applied to measure aspects of shared situation awareness at level 2 and 3 in Endsley’s (1995) model. This paper reports on a shared awareness instrument focused on level 1 situation awareness and its associated level of team shared awareness. Participants in a large emergency response exercise were asked to locate and rank geographical locations based on importance for overall mission success. The results show that organizations tended to rank locations relevant for their own work higher than positions relevant to other organization’s tasks. The different organizations displayed different levels of inter-rater agreement within themselves concerning the ranking of these positions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2015
Series
Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, ISSN 1071-1813, E-ISSN 2169-5067 ; 59
National Category
Business Administration Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126629 (URN)10.1177/1541931215591178 (DOI)
Conference
Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 59th Annual Meeting
Available from: 2016-03-31 Created: 2016-03-31 Last updated: 2019-01-31Bibliographically approved
Lundberg, J. & Johansson, B. J. (2015). Systemic resilience model. Reliability Engineering & System Safety, 141, 22-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Systemic resilience model
2015 (English)In: Reliability Engineering & System Safety, ISSN 0951-8320, E-ISSN 1879-0836, ISSN 0951-8320, Vol. 141, p. 22-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It has been realized that resilience as a concept involves several contradictory definitions, both for instance resilience as agile adjustment and as robust resistance to situations. Our analysis of resilience concepts and models suggest that beyond simplistic definitions, it is possible to draw up a systemic resilience model (SyRes) that maintains these opposing characteristics without contradiction. We outline six functions in a systemic model, drawing primarily on resilience engineering, and disaster response: anticipation, monitoring, response, recovery, learning, and self-monitoring. The model consists of four areas: Event-based constraints, Functional Dependencies, Adaptive Capacity and Strategy. The paper describes dependencies between constraints, functions and strategies. We argue that models such as SyRes should be useful both for envisioning new resilience methods and metrics, as well as for engineering and evaluating resilient systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Resilience, Systemic model, Self-monitoring, Safety II, Adaptive systems
National Category
Other Computer and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115859 (URN)10.1016/j.ress.2015.03.013 (DOI)000357145200004 ()
Available from: 2015-03-20 Created: 2015-03-20 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Johansson, B. (2014). Agility in Command and Control - Functional Models of Cognition. In: P. Berggren, S. Nählinder, E. Svensson (Ed.), Assessing command and control effectiveness: Dealing with a changing World (pp. 177-193). Ashgate
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Agility in Command and Control - Functional Models of Cognition
2014 (English)In: Assessing command and control effectiveness: Dealing with a changing World / [ed] P. Berggren, S. Nählinder, E. Svensson, Ashgate, 2014, p. 177-193Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Ashgate, 2014
Series
Human Factors in Defense
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117739 (URN)9781472436948 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-05-07 Created: 2015-05-07 Last updated: 2018-04-27
Berggren, P., Johansson, B., Baroutsi, N., Turcotte, I. & Tremblay, S. (2014). Assessing team focused behaviors in emergency response teams using the shared priorities measure. In: ISCRAM 2014 Conference Proceedings - 11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management: . Paper presented at 11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management, ISCRAM 2014 (pp. 130-134). The Pennsylvania State University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing team focused behaviors in emergency response teams using the shared priorities measure
Show others...
2014 (English)In: ISCRAM 2014 Conference Proceedings - 11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management, The Pennsylvania State University , 2014, p. 130-134Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this work in progress paper is to report on the method development of the Shared Priorities measure to include content analysis, as a way of gaining a deeper understanding of team work in crisis/emergency response. An experiment is reported where the performance of six trained teams is compared with the performance of six non-trained teams. The experiment was performed using an emergency response microworld simulation with a forest fire scenario. Dependent measures were simulation performance, the Crew Awareness Rating Scale (CARS), and content analysis. Trained teams performed better and scored higher on measures of team behaviors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Pennsylvania State University, 2014
Series
ISCRAM 2014 Conference Proceedings - 11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management
Keywords
CARS; Method development; Microworld studies; Performance assessment; Shared priorities; Team behavior; Team situation awareness
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-116778 (URN)2-s2.0-84905864778 (Scopus ID)9780692211946 (ISBN)
Conference
11th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management, ISCRAM 2014
Available from: 2015-04-02 Created: 2015-04-02 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Johansson, B., Hellgren, C., Oskarsson, P.-A. & Svensson, J. (2014). Hand-Held Support for Spatial Awareness for the Dismounted Soldier. In: C. Stephanidis (Ed.), HCI Posters 1: . Paper presented at HCI (pp. 335-340). , 1
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hand-Held Support for Spatial Awareness for the Dismounted Soldier
2014 (English)In: HCI Posters 1 / [ed] C. Stephanidis, 2014, Vol. 1, p. 335-340Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This contribution presents a summary of activities performed in an ongoing military research project aiming at investigating the impact of navigational support on spatial awareness. Investigated tasks are e.g. indication of direction to objects beyond visual range with and without navigational support, display size, performance time, and use of GPS device in darkness. The results indicate that the ability to keep track of targets in the terrain without a technical aid is very poor, but with a GPS device targets can be indicated with relatively high precision. Precision on target indication is slightly better with a larger display, it seems possible to indicate as fast as 5 seconds with a GPS device without impairments of precision, and a GPS device can be used for target indication in darkness. Spatial ability measured by PTSOT can discriminate important aspects of spatial ability with direct relevance for navigation and target indication.

National Category
Signal Processing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117737 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-07857-1_59 (DOI)978-3-319-07856-4 (ISBN)
Conference
HCI
Available from: 2015-05-07 Created: 2015-05-07 Last updated: 2015-05-21
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8701-8689

Search in DiVA

Show all publications