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Storbjörk, Sofie
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Glaas, E., Hjerpe, M., Storbjörk, S., Schmid Neset, T.-S., Bohman, A., Muthumanickam, P. & Johansson, J. (2019). Developing transformative capacity through systematic assessments and visualization of urban climate transitions. Ambio, 48(5), 515-528
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developing transformative capacity through systematic assessments and visualization of urban climate transitions
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2019 (English)In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 515-528Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Transforming cities into low-carbon, resilient, and sustainable places will require action encompassing most segments of society. However, local governments struggle to overview and assess all ongoing climate activities in a city, constraining well-informed decision-making and transformative capacity. This paper proposes and tests an assessment framework developed to visualize the implementation of urban climate transition (UCT). Integrating key transition activities and process progression, the framework was applied to three Swedish cities. Climate coordinators and municipal councillors evaluated the visual UCT representations. Results indicate that their understanding of UCT actions and implementation bottlenecks became clearer, making transition more governable. To facilitate UCT, involving external actors and shifting priorities between areas were found to be key. The visual UCT representations improved system awareness and memory, building local transformative capacity. The study recommends systematic assessment and visualization of process progression as a promising method to facilitate UCT governance, but potentially also broader sustainability transitions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2019
Keywords
Assessment, Climate change, Governance, Transformative capacity, Urban Climate Transition, Visualization
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-156632 (URN)10.1007/s13280-018-1109-9 (DOI)000464713200007 ()30392034 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85053557955 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agencies: Norrkoping Research and Development Foundation; Swedish Research Council Formas [942-2015-106]

Available from: 2019-04-30 Created: 2019-04-30 Last updated: 2019-05-28Bibliographically approved
Storbjörk, S., Hjerpe, M. & Glaas, E. (2019). Using public-private interplay to climate-proof urban planning?: Critical lessons from developing a new housing district in Karlstad, Sweden. Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, 62(4), 568-585
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using public-private interplay to climate-proof urban planning?: Critical lessons from developing a new housing district in Karlstad, Sweden
2019 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 62, no 4, p. 568-585Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While strengthening public–private interplay is expected to improve the climate profile of urban planning in terms of mitigation and adaptation, less is known about the practice of such new interactive modes of governing. The paper critically examines the role, benefits and limitations of extended public–private interplay in developing a new housing district in Sweden. The developer dialogue between municipal officials and property developers confirms mutual interests, shared understandings and the added value of interacting. However, the closer the dialogue comes to settling agreements, the more difficult it gets for municipal officials to steer the process and its outcomes in favor of climate proofing. Complications with adapting to the new interactive setting means that municipal officials balance between acting as facilitators and/or regulators and property developers between acting as partners, competitors and/or defenders. Refining steering-strategies for sustaining commitments and securing formal agreements are pertinent for using public–private interplay to climate-proof urban planning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
National Category
Social Sciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-158266 (URN)10.1080/09640568.2018.1434490 (DOI)000471052700002 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 242-2011-1599
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council Formas under Climate Change Policy Integration in Local Policy and Planning (CLIPP) [242-2011-1599]; Swedish Research Council Formas under Exploring Urban Climate Transitions in the Making (ExTra) [942-2015-106]

Available from: 2019-06-27 Created: 2019-06-27 Last updated: 2019-07-15
Hjerpe, M., Glaas, E. & Storbjörk, S. (2018). Scrutinizing virtual citizen involvement in planning: Ten applications of an online participatory tool. Politics and Governance, 6(3), 159-169
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Scrutinizing virtual citizen involvement in planning: Ten applications of an online participatory tool
2018 (English)In: Politics and Governance, ISSN 1801-3422, E-ISSN 2183-2463, ISSN 2183-2463, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 159-169Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How to organize citizen participation in planning is continuously debated. The amount of Online Participatory Tools (OPTs) to facilitate inclusive and efficient participation has increased. While studies have assessed their functionality, usability and effectiveness in planning, they have rarely analyzed OPTs beyond single-cases, targeted tools that are widely used or assessed how OPTs affect broader values of participation. Targeting this absence, this study analyzes how ten applications of a widely used OPT, CityPlanner™, affect the normative, substantive and instrumental values of citizen participatory planning in Swedish cities. By analyzing 1,354 citizen proposals and interviewing urban planners, we find that citizens more extensively submit proposals and initiate debates on planning when using the OPT. Results suggest a more even age and gender distribution among proposal users than with conventional methods, facilitating normative values of participation. The OPT was generally applied early in planning and generated high-quality inputs. Our results, however, nuance previous analyses by also emphasizing the importance of place-specificity of OPT applications and of joint participation strategies among departments. Key for OPT development includes the need to improve their ability to analyze overarching trends among inputs.

Keywords
citizen participation, governance, online partcicipatory tools, planning, visualization
National Category
Social Sciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Public Administration Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-151983 (URN)10.17645/pag.v6i3.1481 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 942-2015-106
Note

Funding agencies: Norrkoping Research and Development Foundation; Swedish Research Council Formas [942-2015-106]

Available from: 2018-10-12 Created: 2018-10-12 Last updated: 2018-12-13
Storbjörk, S., Hjerpe, M. & Isaksson, K. (2018). ‘We cannot be at the forefront, changing society’: exploring how Swedish property developers respond to climate change in urban planning. Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, 20(1), 81-95
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘We cannot be at the forefront, changing society’: exploring how Swedish property developers respond to climate change in urban planning
2018 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 81-95Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is increasingly expected that private actors play the role as entrepreneurs and front-runners in implementing climate measures, whereas empirical studies of the position, role and engagement of private actors are scarce. Situated in the context of urban planning, a critical arena for triggering climate transitions, the aim of this paper is to explore how Swedish property developers respond to climate change. Qualitative analyses of corporate policy documents and semi-structured interviews with property developers reveal a vast divergence between the written policies, where leadership ambitions are high, and how the practice of property development is discussed in interviews. In the latter, there is little evidence of property developers pursuing a forward-looking or cutting-edge climate change agenda. Instead, they are critical of increased public regulation for climate-oriented measures. Explanations both confirm previous studies, highlighting lack of perceived customer demand, uncertainty of financial returns and limited innovations, and add new elements of place-dependency suggesting that innovative and front-runner practices can only be realized in the larger urban areas. Municipalities seeking to improve their climate-oriented profile in urban planning by involving private property developers need to develop strategies to maneuver the variance in responses to increase the effectiveness of implementation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
climate change, implementation, urban planning, property developers, public-private
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-137575 (URN)10.1080/1523908X.2017.1322944 (DOI)000427056700006 ()2-s2.0-85018320190 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 242-2011-1599
Available from: 2017-05-22 Created: 2017-05-22 Last updated: 2018-06-15Bibliographically approved
Antonson, H., Isaksson, K., Storbjörk, S. & Hjerpe, M. (2016). Negotiating climate change responses: Regional and local perspectives on transport and coastal zone planning in South Sweden. Land use policy, 52, 297-305
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Negotiating climate change responses: Regional and local perspectives on transport and coastal zone planning in South Sweden
2016 (English)In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 52, p. 297-305Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Putting climate change policy-integration into practice is challenged by problems of institutional misfit, due to, inter alia, deficient vertical administrative interplay. While most focus within the field of climate change research has targeted the national-local interplay, less is known about the interface of regional and local perspectives. Here, the aim is to study that interface with a specific focus on the relation between regional and local spatial planning actors, through a case-study of transport and coastal zone management in a Swedish municipality. The article is based on interviews (focus group and single in-depth) and official planning documents. The material reveals a tricky planning situation, replete with conflict. In practice, various institutional frameworks, claims and ambitions collide. The attempts to steer the local spatial planning initiatives from the regional level led to conflicts, which in turn seems to have hampered the overall work for climate change management through spatial planning. Furthermore, there are few traces of prospects of a smooth vertical institutional interplay able to support the overall aims related to integrating climate change mitigation and adaptation in spatial planning. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2016
Keywords
Climate change; Spatial planning; Regional-local interplay; Goal conflicts; Sustainable transportation; Coastal zone planning/management
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127449 (URN)10.1016/j.landusepol.2015.12.033 (DOI)000372387900027 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council FORMAS [242-2011-1599]

Available from: 2016-05-01 Created: 2016-04-26 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Hrelja, R., Hjerpe, M. & Storbjörk, S. (2015). Creating Transformative Force?: The Role of Spatial Planning in Climate Change Transitions Towards Sustainable Transportation. Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, 17(5), 617-635
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Creating Transformative Force?: The Role of Spatial Planning in Climate Change Transitions Towards Sustainable Transportation
2015 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 617-635Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Informed by the concept of strategy making, this paper analyses the ability of spatial planning to support local climate change transitions towards sustainable transportation in two case studies of planning in Swedish municipalities with comparatively high climate ambitions. The analysis shows that the expectations on planning to effect change need to be moderated. Not even in these climate-ambitious municipalities did transportation planning result in strategic reorientation. While climate change was clearly filtered into local strategy making, no new climate frame was established. Rather in goals, it was linked to an overall attractive city storyline. Transportation planners have sought to mobilize force through developing new tools and routines to strengthen the role of climate change. In detailed planning, however, when plans become legally binding, agency in relation to climate change was limited by allowing private actors a pivotal position. Also, tools were used selectively and when settling priorities, climate change was subordinate to economic growth interests. While the planning observed can be regarded as weak, its ability to support climate transition would have been even weaker had it not been linked to the attractive city storyline. Consequently, to facilitate climate transition mobilizing force needs to be generated within the current local implementation structure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2015
Keywords
Climate change, spatial planning, transition, transportation, strategic
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114703 (URN)10.1080/1523908X.2014.1003535 (DOI)000363049300006 ()
Projects
CLIPP
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council FORMAS [Dnr 242-2011-1599]

Available from: 2015-03-03 Created: 2015-03-03 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Massey, E., Huitema, D., Garrelts, H., Grecksch, K., Mees, H., Rayner, T., . . . Winges, M. (2015). Handling adaptation governance choices in Sweden, Germany, the UK and the Netherlands. Journal of Water and Climate Change, 6(1), 9-24
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Handling adaptation governance choices in Sweden, Germany, the UK and the Netherlands
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Water and Climate Change, ISSN 2040-2244, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 9-24Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Attention is increasing in academia towards the governance of adaptation, specifically how state and non-state actors are defining the adaptation ‘problematique’ and crafting public policies to address it. Adaptation is the ‘Adjustment in natural or human systems in response to actual or expected climatic stimuli or their effects, which moderates harm or exploits beneficial opportunities’. The challenge for governments is taking this rather vague concept and turning it into viable and implementable public policies. This implies that they have to make choices as to the types of polices to create, the sectors they should cover, ministerial jurisdictions and funding. This article contributes to the discussion on the adaptation governance by presenting a conceptual framework that outlines policy choices governors need to make, by applying this framework to a number of countries, and starting the debate on which choice or choices were particularly instrumental in shaping adaptation policy in particular countries as a whole. It focuses on four countries traditionally seen to be adaptation leaders: Germany, The Netherlands, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IWA Publishing, 2015
Keywords
adaptation governance, climate change adaptation, European environmental policy
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111232 (URN)10.2166/wcc.2014.110 (DOI)000351207900002 ()
Available from: 2014-10-13 Created: 2014-10-13 Last updated: 2015-04-22
Storbjörk, S. & Uggla, Y. (2015). The practice of settling and enacting strategic guidelines for climate adaptation in spatial planning: lessons from ten Swedish municipalities. Regional Environmental Change, 15(6), 1133-1143
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The practice of settling and enacting strategic guidelines for climate adaptation in spatial planning: lessons from ten Swedish municipalities
2015 (English)In: Regional Environmental Change, ISSN 1436-3798, E-ISSN 1436-378X, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 1133-1143Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Spatial planning is increasingly expected to address climate change adaptation. In a Swedish context this has meant a predominant focus on risks of flooding, erosion and sea-level rise. Gradually, regulatory mechanisms and concrete strategies are evolving to support practical mainstreaming. The aim of this paper is to analyze how frontline planners approach climate change adaptation in an urban context, emphasizing the process of settling and enacting strategic guidelines in spatial planning. The study suggests that municipalities are being preactive i.e. preparing to act by settling guidelines rather than proactively implementing change when planning for new settlements. Further the process of accommodating climate risks involves problems. Settling strategic guidelines and determining appropriate levels for what to adapt to are but the start of approaching climate change. Guidelines represent more of an endeavor than settling absolute limits and actually applying the guidelines involves challenges of accessibility and aesthetics where the new waterfront limits meets older city structures. Further, guidelines are seen as negotiable since an overarching principle is to maintain flexibility in planning to allow for continued waterfront planning. Pursuing this path is motivated by current demand and previous urban settlement patterns. Also, as future protective measures are needed to secure existing urban areas at risk of flooding and erosion planners see no use in preventing further waterfront development. Although settling guidelines are important in preparing to act, their practical effectiveness all fall back to how they are actually implemented in daily planning. This leads us to problematize the role of strategic guidelines to secure a climate-proof spatial planning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2015
Keywords
climate adaptation, spatial planning, implementation, frontline practitioners, strategic guidelines, negotiating order
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111231 (URN)10.1007/s10113-014-0690-0 (DOI)000358294000016 ()
Note

Funding: Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning (FORMAS) [214-2006-146]; Department of Environmental Change at Linkoping University; FORMAS research project CLIPP "Climate change policy integration in local policy and 

Available from: 2014-10-13 Created: 2014-10-13 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Hjerpe, M., Storbjörk, S. & Alberth, J. (2015). “There is nothing political in it”: triggers of local political leaders' engagement in climate adaptation. Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, 20(8), 855-873
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“There is nothing political in it”: triggers of local political leaders' engagement in climate adaptation
2015 (English)In: Local Environment: the International Journal of Justice and Sustainability, ISSN 1354-9839, E-ISSN 1469-6711, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 855-873Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Local government is attributed a vital role in climate-change adaptation. Previous studies contend that conflicting priorities, insufficient institutional incentives and knowledge of risks, and inadequate resources all impede local climate adaptation. Though the importance of local political support in enabling climate adaptation is widely acknowledged, the views of local politicians have rarely been analysed. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with local politicians in Sweden, we explore what affects their engagement in climate adaptation. The study claims that climate adaptation contrary to mitigation is not viewed as political beyond directing attention and sanctioning guidelines set by officials. A limited number of interviewees claim a more strategic political role in adaptation. The combined effect of institutional incentives (e.g. fragmented national guidelines, unappealing goals, and lack of funding), relative weight in local politics, and ability to exercise political leadership (e.g. campaign value, public and media pressure, and lack of ideology) is perceived as too insignificant to trigger strong political engagement. In less-populous municipalities, adaptive measures were highly valued for demonstrating political action.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2015
Keywords
climate change; policy integration; adaptation; politicians; priority; barriers
National Category
Social Sciences Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-104255 (URN)10.1080/13549839.2013.872092 (DOI)000212151800001 ()
Projects
Sårbarhet och anpassningsförmåga inför klimatförändringar i Östergötland och CLIPP
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2014-02-13 Created: 2014-02-13 Last updated: 2018-03-09Bibliographically approved
Storbjörk, S. & Isaksson, K. (2014). “Learning is our Achilles heel”. Conditions for long-term environmental policy integration in Swedish regional development programming. Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, 57(7), 1023-1042
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Learning is our Achilles heel”. Conditions for long-term environmental policy integration in Swedish regional development programming
2014 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 57, no 7, p. 1023-1042Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper isto explore how the capacity to integrate environmental sustainability inSwedish regional development programming has evolved over time, with particularfocus on what facilitates and restricts change in different stages ofimplementation. The study builds on focus-group and individual interviews infour Swedish regions carried out in 2005 and 2011. The results suggesttemporary and partial rather than enduring and substantial environmental policyintegration (EPI). In 2005 the main challenges were to allocate support, focus and priority beyond the national policyrhetoric of regional sustainable development, to identify regional applicationsbeyond singular “pockets of good practice” and to spread ownership andengagement for EPI from specific ambassadors to organizational mainstreaming.In 2011 we find evidence of a more mainstreamed approach of regionalsustainable development but with new challenges of policy diffusion andsectorisation as well as a strong sense of projectification. There is a need todevelop arenas and processes for inter-sectoral exchange, interaction andlearning to achieve a more systematic change – which is, in essence, whatpolicy integration is all about.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2014
Keywords
environmental policy-integration, implementation, learning, barriers, mainstreaming
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-93274 (URN)10.1080/09640568.2013.779232 (DOI)000335847000004 ()
Available from: 2013-05-29 Created: 2013-05-29 Last updated: 2017-12-06
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