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Mendoza-Galvan, A., Munoz-Pineda, E., Järrendahl, K. & Arwin, H. (2016). Birefringence of nanocrystalline chitin films studied by Mueller-matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry. Optical Materials Express, 6(2), 671-681
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Birefringence of nanocrystalline chitin films studied by Mueller-matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry
2016 (English)In: Optical Materials Express, ISSN 2159-3930, E-ISSN 2159-3930, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 671-681Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Birefringent chitin films were prepared by a dipping technique from aqueous suspensions of chitin nanocrystals in a nematic liquid crystal phase. In the films, chitin nanocrystals are preferentially oriented along the withdrawal direction. Normal incidence transmission Mueller-matrix (M) spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements as a function of sample rotation were used to investigate the optical birefringence in the spectral range 0.73 to 5 eV. Analysis of eigenvalues and depolarization data reveal that the Mueller matrix corresponds to a pure retarder for photon energies below 4 eV and is depolarizing in the range 4 to 5 eV. By modeling the chitin film as a slab with in-plane anisotropy the birefringence was determined. The determination of birefringence was extended to include the range of 4 to 5 eV by a differential decomposition of M. (C) 2016 Optical Society of America

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OPTICAL SOC AMER, 2016
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127060 (URN)10.1364/OME.6.000671 (DOI)000372039500041 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Concayt-Mexico; Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundation; Swedish Research Council; Carl Tryggers foundation; Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Functional Materials at Linkoping University (Faculty Grant SFO-Mat-LiU) [2009-00971]

Available from: 2016-04-13 Created: 2016-04-13 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Karpus, V., Tumenas, S., Eikevicius, A. & Arwin, H. (2016). Interband optical transitions of Zn. Physica status solidi. B, Basic research, 253(3), 419-428
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interband optical transitions of Zn
2016 (English)In: Physica status solidi. B, Basic research, ISSN 0370-1972, E-ISSN 1521-3951, Vol. 253, no 3, p. 419-428Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Experimental results of an optical study of single-crystal zinc are presented. Components of the Zn dielectric function tensor were measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry in the 0.1-5 eV spectral range. In the NIR-VIS range, the dielectric function spectra show two clearly resolved, polarization-dependent optical features located at about 1 and 1.7 eV. The optical features were analyzed in a framework of parallel-band optical transitions. The performed theoretical calculations of the optical conductivity spectra well reproduce the experimental data with respect to positions, intensities, and polarization dependencies of the observed interband absorption peaks. (C) 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY-V C H VERLAG GMBH, 2016
Keyword
electronic band structure; interband optical transitions; metals; spectroscopic ellipsometry
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126823 (URN)10.1002/pssb.201552581 (DOI)000371634800002 ()
Available from: 2016-04-07 Created: 2016-04-05 Last updated: 2017-06-12
Fernandez Del Rio, L., Arwin, H. & Järrendahl, K. (2016). Polarizing properties and structure of the cuticle of scarab beetles from the Chrysina genus. PHYSICAL REVIEW E, 94(1), 012409
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Polarizing properties and structure of the cuticle of scarab beetles from the Chrysina genus
2016 (English)In: PHYSICAL REVIEW E, ISSN 2470-0045, Vol. 94, no 1, p. 012409-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The optical properties of several scarab beetles have been previously studied but few attempts have been made to compare beetles in the same genus. To determine whether there is any relation between specimens of the same genus, we have studied and classified seven species from the Chrysina genus. The polarization properties were analyzed with Mueller-matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry and the structural characteristics with optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Most of the Chrysina beetles are green colored or have a metallic look (gold or silver). The results show that the green-colored beetles polarize reflected light mainly at off-specular angles. The gold-colored beetles polarize light left-handed near circular at specular reflection. The structure of the exoskeleton is a stack of layers that form a cusplike structure in the green beetles whereas the layers are parallel to the surface in the case of the gold-colored beetles. The beetle C. gloriosa is green with gold-colored stripes along the elytras and exhibits both types of effects. The results indicate that Chrysina beetles can be classified according to these two major polarization properties.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER PHYSICAL SOC, 2016
National Category
Mathematical Analysis
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130835 (URN)10.1103/PhysRevE.94.012409 (DOI)000380116500010 ()
External cooperation:
Note

Funding Agencies|Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundation; Swedish Research Council; Centre in Nano Science and Nano Technology (CeNano) at Linkoping University

Available from: 2016-08-26 Created: 2016-08-26 Last updated: 2016-11-16
Valyukh, S., Arwin, H. & Järrendahl, K. (2016). Simulation of light scattering from exoskeletons of scarab beetles. Optics Express, 24(6), 5794-5808
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Simulation of light scattering from exoskeletons of scarab beetles
2016 (English)In: Optics Express, ISSN 1094-4087, E-ISSN 1094-4087, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 5794-5808Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An approach for simulation of light scattering from beetles exhibiting structural colors originating from periodic helicoidal structures is presented. Slight irregularities of the periodic structure in the exoskeleton of the beetles are considered as a major cause of light scattering. Two sources of scattering are taken into account: surface roughness and volume non-uniformity. The Kirchhoff approximation is applied to simulate the effect of surface roughness. To describe volume non-uniformity, the whole structure is modeled as a set of domains distributed in space in different orientations. Each domain is modeled as an ideal uniformly twisted uniaxial medium and differs from each other by the pitch. Distributions of the domain parameters are assumed to be Gaussian. The analysis is performed using the Mueller matrix formalism which, in addition to spectral and spatial characteristics, also provides polarization properties of the scattered light. (C) 2016 Optical Society of America

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OPTICAL SOC AMER, 2016
National Category
Other Physics Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127568 (URN)10.1364/OE.24.005794 (DOI)000373395700039 ()27136777 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council Formas; Swedish Research Council VR

Available from: 2016-05-04 Created: 2016-05-03 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Arwin, H., Mendoza-Galvan, A., Magnusson, R., Andersson, A., Landin, J., Järrendahl, K., . . . Ossikovski, R. (2016). Structural circular birefringence and dichroism quantified by differential decomposition of spectroscopic transmission Mueller matrices from Cetonia aurata. Optics Letters, 41(14), 3293-3296
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Structural circular birefringence and dichroism quantified by differential decomposition of spectroscopic transmission Mueller matrices from Cetonia aurata
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2016 (English)In: Optics Letters, ISSN 0146-9592, E-ISSN 1539-4794, Vol. 41, no 14, p. 3293-3296Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Transmission Mueller-matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry is applied to the cuticle of the beetle Cetonia aurata in the spectral range 300-1000 nm. The cuticle is optically reciprocal and exhibits circular Bragg filter features for green light. By using differential decomposition of the Mueller matrix, the circular and linear birefringence as well as dichroism of the beetle cuticle are quantified. A maximum value of structural optical activity of 560 degrees/mm is found. (C) 2016 Optical Society of America

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OPTICAL SOC AMER, 2016
National Category
Atom and Molecular Physics and Optics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130379 (URN)10.1364/OL.41.003293 (DOI)000379681400036 ()27420518 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Functional Materials at Linkoping University; Carl Tryggers Foundation [CTS:31]; Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation [2004.0233]; Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia (CONACYT); Vetenskapsradet (VR) [621-2011-4283]

Available from: 2016-08-15 Created: 2016-08-05 Last updated: 2017-11-28
Magnusson, R., Arwin, H., Garcia-Caure, E., Järrendahl, K. & Ossikovski, R. (2016). Sum regression decomposition of spectral and angle-resolved Mueller-matrices from biological reflectors. Applied Optics, 55(15), 4060-4065
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sum regression decomposition of spectral and angle-resolved Mueller-matrices from biological reflectors
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2016 (English)In: Applied Optics, ISSN 1559-128X, E-ISSN 2155-3165, Vol. 55, no 15, p. 4060-4065Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this report we present studies on beetles of the Scarabaeidae family. The selected beetles show brilliant colors and in addition interesting polarization features. Mueller matrices of such beetles are of large interest to explore for biomimetics and for the understanding of the biological relevance of the observed polarization phenomena. Several species of the Scarabaeidae family have been studied by Hodgkinson, Goldstein  and our group to mention some. Ellipticity, degree of polarization and other derived parameters have been reported and Arwin et al. also did optical modeling to determine structural parameters of the scutellum part of the exoskeleton of Cetonia aurata. Mueller matrices are very rich in information about the sample properties and can also be analyzed by addressing depolarization. Cloude showed that a depolarizing Mueller matrix can be represented by a sum of up to four non-depolarizing Mueller matrices weighted by the eigenvalues of the covariance matrix of the Mueller matrix. These eigenvalues are all positive for a physically realizable Mueller matrix and this, so called sum decomposition can be used to filter matrices and obtain a measure of experimental fidelity. The result of the decomposition can also be used to describe a Mueller matrix as a set of basic optical elements having direct physical meaning, such as polarizers and retarders. Pioneering work on decomposition of Mueller-matrix images, including studies of beetles, was performed by Ossikovski et al. We have also previously demonstrated this with Cloude as well as regression decomposition of Mueller matrix spectra and images measured at near-normal incidence on C. aurata. Using Cloude decomposition we found that the experimentally determined Mueller matrix of C. aurata decomposes into a set of a mirror and a circular polarizer. Those results were then the basis for a more stable regression decomposition where the result was confirmed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Optical Society of America, 2016
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111946 (URN)10.1364/AO.55.004060 (DOI)000376382300022 ()
Note

Funding agencies:  Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Functional Materials at Linkoping University (Faculty Grant SFO Mat LiU) [2009 00971]; Vetenskapsradet (VR) [621-2011-4283]; Knut och Alice Wallenbergs Stiftelse [2004.0233]; Carl Tryggers

Vid tiden för disputation förelåg publikationen endast som manuskript

Available from: 2014-11-11 Created: 2014-11-11 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Chen, J., Obitz, C., Arwin, H. & Forssgren, B. (2015). CORROSION KINETICS OF NICKEL-BASE ALLOYS WITH HIGH CHROMIUM CONTENTS UNDER SIMULATED BWR NORMAL WATER CHEMISTRY CONDITIONS AND HIGH FLOW VELOCITY. In: : . Paper presented at 17th International Conference on Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power Systems – Water Reactors August 9-12, 2015, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>CORROSION KINETICS OF NICKEL-BASE ALLOYS WITH HIGH CHROMIUM CONTENTS UNDER SIMULATED BWR NORMAL WATER CHEMISTRY CONDITIONS AND HIGH FLOW VELOCITY
2015 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In light water reactors corrosion-induced material degradation is a critical issue not only for material integrity but also for plant radiation field build-up. In BWRs nickel-base alloys, such as Alloy 600, Alloy 82 and Alloy 182, are applied in various parts of reactor components including welds. However, their corrosion mechanisms are not very well understood. Although the complex compositions of different nickel-base alloys generally prohibit us to single out some specific alloy constituent having a major impact on alloy corrosion rate, a higher chromium content is often thought to be beneficial to forming a more protective oxide film against corrosion attack. In this paper we report a corrosion kinetics study on high chromium nickel-base alloy welding consumables, Alloy 52M and Alloy 152, under simulated BWR normal water chemistry conditions and high flow velocity for up to nine weeks exposure. The corrosion rates are derived from measurements of weight losses of test coupons, oxide thicknesses with infrared ellipsometry, and microstructures of oxide films with electron microscopy. The obtained corrosion rates are then compared to that for Alloy 182, Alloy 82 and Alloy 600. The results show that the corrosion rate for Alloy 52M is similar to those for Alloy 182, whereas the rate for Alloy 152 is reduced to less than half. These observations indicate that the corrosion kinetics for nickel-base alloys is complex and alloy chromium content alone is not a dominant factor in influencing alloy corrosion rate.

Keyword
nickel-base alloys, corrosion, rates, kinetics, oxide films, Alloy 52M, Alloy 152, Alloy 82, Alloy 182, Alloy 600, infrared ellipsometry, BWR, SEM, TEM, FIB
National Category
Corrosion Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123362 (URN)
Conference
17th International Conference on Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power Systems – Water Reactors August 9-12, 2015, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Available from: 2015-12-13 Created: 2015-12-13 Last updated: 2015-12-18
Magnusson, R., Ossikovski, R., Garcia-caurel, E., Järrendahl, K. & Arwin, H. (2015). Decomposition of angle resolved spectroscopic Mueller matrices from Scarabaeidae beetles. In: : . Paper presented at AVS 62nd International Symposium & Exhibition, San Jose, CA, USA, October 18-23 2015. American Vacuum Society (AVS)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decomposition of angle resolved spectroscopic Mueller matrices from Scarabaeidae beetles
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2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

We use angle-dependent Mueller-matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry (MMSE) to determine Mueller matrices of Scarabaeidae beetles which show fascinating reflection properties due to structural phenomena in the exocuticle which are often depolarizing. It has been shown by Cloude [1] that a depolarizing matrix can be decomposed into a sum of up to four non-depolarizing matrices according to M= aM­­1+bM2+cM3+dM4, where a, b, c and d are eigenvalues of the covariance matrix of M. Using the same eigenvalues the matrices Mi can be calculated. This method provides the full solution to the decomposition with both the non-depolarizing matrices and the weight of each of them in the sum.

An alternative to Cloude decomposition is regression decomposition. Here any Mueller matrix can be decomposed into a set of matrices Mi which are specified beforehand. Whereas in Cloude decomposition the only constraint on the matrices is that they are physically realizable non-depolarizing Mueller matrices, we can now limit the constraint and only use Mueller matrices representing pure optical devices having direct physical meaning, such as polarizers, retarders, etc. This leaves a, b, c, d as fit parameters to minimize the Frobenius norm Mexp -Mreg where Mexp is the experimentally determined Mueller matrix to be decomposed and Mreg is the sum of all Mi. Depending on Mexp an appropriate choice of Mreg matrices has to be made and different values of a, b, c and d are obtained through regression analysis.

We have previously shown that regression decomposition can be used to show that the Mueller matrix of Cetonia aurata can be decomposed into a sum of a circular polarizer and a mirror [2]. Here we expand the analysis to include angle-resolved spectral Mueller matrices, and also include more species of Scarabaeidae beetles.

One effect of the decomposition is that when depolarization is caused by an inhomogeneous sample with regions of different optical properties the Mueller matrices of the different regions can be retrieved under certain conditions. Regression decomposition also has potential to be a classification tool for biological samples where a set of standard matrices are used in the decomposition and the parameters a, b, c, d are used to quantify the polarizing properties of the sample.

[1] Cloude S.R. 1989. Conditions for the physical realisability of matrix operators in polarimetry. Proc. SPIE 1166, Polarization Considerations for Optical Systems II, pp. 177-185

[2] Arwin H, Magnusson R, Garcia-Caurel E, Fallet C, Järrendahl K, De Martino A, Ossikovski R, 2015. Sum decomposition of Mueller-matrix images and spectra of beetle cuticles. Opt. Express, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 1951–1966

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Vacuum Society (AVS), 2015
Keyword
Mueller-matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry, matrix decomposition, Scarabaeidae beetles
National Category
Atom and Molecular Physics and Optics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123866 (URN)
Conference
AVS 62nd International Symposium & Exhibition, San Jose, CA, USA, October 18-23 2015
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilCarl Tryggers foundation Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Note

Paper EL+EM+EN-ThM13

Available from: 2016-01-12 Created: 2016-01-12 Last updated: 2016-01-20Bibliographically approved
Arwin, H., Magnusson, R., Fernández del Río, L., Landin, J., Mendoza-Galván, A. & Järrendahl, K. (2015). Exploring polarization features in light reflection from beetles with structural colors. In: Proc. SPIE  9429, Bioinspiration, Biomimetics, and Bioreplication 2015: . Paper presented at SPIE: smart structures NDE Bioinspiration, Biomimetics, and Bioreplication 2015 (pp. 942909-1-942909-13). SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 9429
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring polarization features in light reflection from beetles with structural colors
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2015 (English)In: Proc. SPIE  9429, Bioinspiration, Biomimetics, and Bioreplication 2015, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2015, Vol. 9429, p. 942909-1-942909-13Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A Mueller matrix of a sample can be used to determine the polarization of  reflected light  for  incident light with arbitrary polarization. The polarization can be quantified  in terms of ellipticity, polarization azimuth and degree of polarization. We apply spectroscopic Mueller-matrix ellipsometry at multiple angles of incidence  to study the cuticle of beetles and derive  polarization features for incident unpolarized light.  In particular we address chiral phenomena in scarab beetles,  the origin of their structural colors and the observed high degree of circular polarization is discussed. Results from beetles in the Scarabaeidae subfamilies Cetoniinae and Rutelinae are presented including specimens with broad-band silver- or gold-like colors with metallic shine as well as specimens with narrow-band green or red reflectors. The variation of polarization with angle of incidence and occurrence of both left-handed and right-handed polarization from a single species are presented. We also use Mueller-matrix spectra in electromagnetic modeling and show how to determine structural parameters including cuticle layer thicknesses and optical properties. Interference oscillations in the observed spectra are due to allowed optical modes and we show how to develop a structural model of a cuticle based on this effect. Sum decomposition of  Mueller matrices measured on a depolarizing cuticle of a beetle is briefly discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2015
Series
Proceedings of SPIE, ISSN 0277-786X ; 9429
Keyword
Mueller-matrix ellipsometry; chiral reflectors; circular polarization; beetle cuticle
National Category
Atom and Molecular Physics and Optics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-116701 (URN)10.1117/12.2083032 (DOI)000357257400002 ()978-1-62841-532-2 (ISBN)
Conference
SPIE: smart structures NDE Bioinspiration, Biomimetics, and Bioreplication 2015
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2011-4283Carl Tryggers foundation , CTS12:31Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2015-04-01 Created: 2015-04-01 Last updated: 2015-09-22Bibliographically approved
Magnusson, R., Birch, J., Hsiao, C.-L., Sandström, P., Arwin, H. & Järrendahl, K. (2015). InxAl1-xN chiral nanorods mimicking the polarization features of scarab beetles. In: Akhlesh Lakhtakia, Mato Knez, Raúl Martín-Palma (Ed.), SPIE Proceedings Vol. 942: Bioinspiration, Biomimetics, and Bioreplication 2015. Paper presented at SPIE: smart structures NDE Bioinspiration, Biomimetics, and Bioreplication 2015 (pp. 94290A-1-94290A-8). SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 9429
Open this publication in new window or tab >>InxAl1-xN chiral nanorods mimicking the polarization features of scarab beetles
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2015 (English)In: SPIE Proceedings Vol. 942: Bioinspiration, Biomimetics, and Bioreplication 2015 / [ed] Akhlesh Lakhtakia, Mato Knez, Raúl Martín-Palma, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2015, Vol. 9429, p. 94290A-1-94290A-8Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The scarab beetle Cetonia aurata is known to reflect light with brilliant colors and a high degree of circular polarization. Both color and polarization effects originate from the beetles exoskeleton and have been attributed to a Bragg reflection of the incident light due to a twisted laminar structure. Our strategy for mimicking the optical properties of the Cetonia aurata was therefore to design and fabricate transparent, chiral films. A series of films with tailored transparent structures of helicoidal InxAl1-xN nanorods were grown on sapphire substrates using UHV magnetron sputtering. The value of x is tailored to gradually decrease from one side to the other in each nanorod normal to its growth direction. This introduces an in-plane anisotropy with different refractive indices in the direction of the gradient and perpendicular to it. By rotating the sample during film growth the in-plane optical axis will be rotated from bottom to top and thereby creating a chiral film. Based on Muellermatrix ellipsometry, optical modeling has been done suggesting that both the exoskeleton of Cetonia aurata and our artificial material can be modeled by an anisotropic film made up of a stack of thin layers, each one with its in-plane optical axis slightly rotated with respect to the previous layer. Simulations based on the optical modeling were used to investigate how pitch and thickness of the film together with the optical properties of the constitutive materials affects the width and spectral position of the Bragg reflection band.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2015
Series
Proceedings of SPIE, ISSN 0277-786X ; 9429
National Category
Atom and Molecular Physics and Optics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-119058 (URN)10.1117/12.2084164 (DOI)000357257400003 ()978-1-62841-532-2 (ISBN)
Conference
SPIE: smart structures NDE Bioinspiration, Biomimetics, and Bioreplication 2015
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2015-06-08 Created: 2015-06-08 Last updated: 2018-03-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9229-2028

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