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Wilk, Julie
Publications (10 of 42) Show all publications
Wilk, J., Hjerpe, M. & Rydhagen, B. (2015). Adaptation spinoffs from technological and socio-economic changes. In: Tor Håkon Inderberg, Siri Eriksen, Karen O'Brien & Linda Sygna (Ed.), Climate Change Adaptation and Development: Transforming Paradigms and Practices (pp. 161-177). London and New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adaptation spinoffs from technological and socio-economic changes
2015 (English)In: Climate Change Adaptation and Development: Transforming Paradigms and Practices / [ed] Tor Håkon Inderberg, Siri Eriksen, Karen O'Brien & Linda Sygna, London and New York: Routledge, 2015, p. 161-177Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Studies have shown that societal change related to economic growth and development policies can affect the adaptive capacity of communities to a multitude of stressors including climate variability and change. Concerns have recently been raised about the consequences of climate mitigation and adaptation on vulnerable groups and the impacts of large-scale globalization processes on the adaptive capacities of local communities. This chapter addresses how side effects of technological and socioeconomic changes, which we refer to as spinoffs have potential to strengthen climate adaptation strategies. The spinoff examples fall under a two-dimensional framework according to whether they arise from orchestrated or opportunity-driven initiatives and technological or socio-economic changes. Three cases in developing countries undergoing rapid economic growth have been chosen as examples of different types of spinoffs and how they can positively influence climate adaptation and more particularly adaptive capacity. They are: information and communication technology (ICT) in South Africa, changing lifestyles in China and empowerment in India. The cases illustrate that new objects, inventions and trends constantly emerge which have potential to help people improve their livelihoods in ways that can be climate smart. People working as development workers and policy makers need to be observant and engage in open-minded dialogue with communities in order to recognize emergent technologies, lifestyles and trends to facilitate the use and development of on-going or potential spinoffs that positively affect adaptation to climate change.

Abstract [sv]

Olika studier har visat att samhällsförändringar kopplade till ekonomiskt tillväxt eller policy-utveckling kan påverka lokalbefolkningens förmåga att anpassa sig till klimatförändringar och -variation. Många risker och negativa konsekvenser har diskuterats. Detta kapitel lyfter fram hur sidoeffekter av teknologiska eller samhällsförändringar, så kallade spinoff-effekter, kan ha positiv påverkan på anpassningsförmågan i lokalsamhället. Tre exempel ges i kapitlet. Spinoff-effekterna analyseras mot bakgrund av om förändringarna är planerade eller spontana, och om de gäller teknologiska eller socioekonmiska förändringar. Det första exemplet, spontan teknologisk utveckling, handlar om hur IT i Sydafrika kan användas för att skapa nätverk som motverkar skogsbränder vid torka. Det andra, spontan socioekonomisk förändring, handlar om hur efterfrågan på lokal turism och ekologiska livsmedel på landsbygden i Kina har bidragit till differentiering av försörjningen och ökat lantbrukarnas inkomster. Det tredje, planerad socioeknomisk förändring, handlar om hur stärkta kvinnogrupper i Indien lättare hanterar vattenförsörjning och tar ökat ledarskap. Dessa exempel vill visa för utvecklingsarbetare och politiker att det är viktigt att vara uppmärksam på, och föra en öppen dialog med lokalsamhällen för att få syn på hur ny teknologi, livsstilsförändringar och trender kan samverka och nyttjas i arbetetet med klimatanpassning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London and New York: Routledge, 2015
Keywords
Climate change, development, adaptation
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114337 (URN)978-1-138-02596-7 (ISBN)978-1-138-02598-1 (ISBN)978-1-315-77465-7 (ISBN)
Note

Contents

1. Development as Usual is not Enough Siri Eriksen, Tor Håkon Inderberg, Karen O’Brien and Linda Sygna 2. Building Adaptive Capacity in the Informal Settlements of Maputo: Lessons for Development from a Resilience Perspective Jon Ensor, Emily Boyd, Sirrku Juhola, and Castan Broto 3. The Societal Role of Charcoal Production in Climate Change Adaptation of the Arid and Semi-Arid Lands (ASALs) of Kenya Caroline Ochieng, Sirkku Juhola, and Francis X. Johnson 4. Adaptive Capacity: From coping to sustainable transformation Christine Wamsler and Ebba Brink 5. Gender Matters: Adaptive capacities to climate variability and change in the Lake Victoria Basin Sara Gabrielsson 6. Adaptation Technologies as Drivers of Social Development Sara Trærup and Lars Christiansen 7. Multilevel Governance and Coproduction in Urban Flood-risk Management: The case of Dar es Salaam Trond Vedeld, Wilbard Kombe, Clara Kweka Msale, and Siri Bjerkreim Hellevik 8. Can Linking Small- and Large-scale Farmers Enhance Adaptive Capacity? Evidence from Tanzania’s Southern Agricultural Growth Corridor Jennifer West 9. Adaptation Spinoffs from Technological and Socio-economic Changes Julie Wilk, Mattias Hjerpe and Birgitte Rydhagen 10. Sustainable Adaptation under Adverse Development? Lessons from Ethiopia Siri H. Eriksen and Andrei Marin 11. The Role of Local Power Relations in the Vulnerability of Households to Climate Change in Humla, Nepal Sigrid Nagoda and Siri H. Eriksen 12. A Socionature Approach to Adaptation: Political transition, intersectionality, and climate change programmes in Nepal Andrea Nightingale 13. Influencing Policy and Action on Climate Change Adaptation: Strategic stakeholder engagement in the agricultural sector in Tanzania.Kassim Kulindwa and Baruani Mshale 14. Limited Room for Manoeuvre: Indigenous Peoples and Climate Change Adaptation Strategies Jacob Kronik and Jennifer Hays 15. Adaptation to Climate Change through Transformation Karen O’Brien, Siri Eriksen, Tor Håkon Inderberg and Linda Sygna

Available from: 2015-02-18 Created: 2015-02-18 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, A. C., Rydhagen, B., Wilk, J., Feroz, A. R., Rani, A. & Kumar, A. (2015). CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION IN URBAN INDIA: THE INCLUSIVE FORMULATION OF LOCAL ADAPTATION STRATEGIES. GLOBAL NEST JOURNAL, 17(1), 61-71
Open this publication in new window or tab >>CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION IN URBAN INDIA: THE INCLUSIVE FORMULATION OF LOCAL ADAPTATION STRATEGIES
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2015 (English)In: GLOBAL NEST JOURNAL, ISSN 1790-7632, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 61-71Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Kota, the third largest city of Rajasthan, poverty levels are high in many areas and there is a great need to assess the vulnerability and adaptive capacity of different societal groups and sectors to the impacts of climatic variability and change, and to formulate sustainable planning strategies. The city is a large rapidly growing centre (but not a megacity), facing a varied and challenging water situation and anticipated harmful effects of climate change. The methodological approach involves participatory workshops with key stakeholders in urban administration to identify vulnerabilities, and discuss concrete strategies for increasing the adaptive capacity of the most vulnerable areas and sectors. The paper focuses on water resource planning (storm, potable, and wastewater), since it is already a challenging societal issue and one which will become even more critical in the future with climate change. We aim to contribute to improved urban water management for sustainable climate change adaptation in developing countries through an improved methodology of vulnerability assessments, capacity building and social learning, and a deeper empirical understanding of an urban context in Central India.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
GLOBAL NETWORK ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE and TECHNOLOGY, 2015
Keywords
climate change adaptation; urban planning; participatory assessment; India; slum populations; wastewater drainage; heat wave; flash flood; solid waste management
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117671 (URN)000352254200007 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Sarec/Sida [AWE-2010-138]

Available from: 2015-05-11 Created: 2015-05-06 Last updated: 2016-06-14
Wilk, J., Hjerpe, M., Yuan, W. & Fan, H. (2015). Farm-scale adaptation under extreme climate and rapid economic transition. Environment, Development and Sustainability, 17(3), 393-407
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Farm-scale adaptation under extreme climate and rapid economic transition
2015 (English)In: Environment, Development and Sustainability, ISSN 1387-585X, E-ISSN 1573-2975, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 393-407Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper aims to analyse what shapes farmers’ vulnerability and adaptation strategies in the context of rapid change. Xinjiang is semi-arid, with extremes of temperature, growing seasons and winds. Favourable socioeconomic conditions have boosted the wellbeing of farmers in the past decades. Interviews with forty-seven farmers led to the categorization of five groups according to the predominant type of farming activity: animal farmers, government farmers (leasing land from the Xinjiang Production and Construction Group), crop farmers, agri-tourism operators and entrepreneurs. High government support has aided farmers to deal with climate challenges, through advanced technology, subsidies and loans. Farmers, however, greatly contribute to their own high adaptive capacity through inventiveness, flexibility and a high knowledge base. Although the future climate will entail hotter temperatures, farmers can be seen as generally well equipped to deal with these challenges because of the high adaptive capacity they currently have and utilize. Those that are most vulnerable are those that have difficulty to access credit e.g. animal farmers and those that do not want to change their agricultural systems e.g. from pastoral lifestyles to include tourism-based operations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2015
Keywords
Climate change, Farm-level adaptation, Multiple stressors, Agriculture, China, Planning strategies
National Category
Climate Research Environmental Sciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112683 (URN)10.1007/s10668-014-9549-2 (DOI)000354481200002 ()
Projects
SIDA Water Resources Vulnerability
Available from: 2014-12-08 Created: 2014-12-08 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Jonsson, A. C. & Wilk, J. (2014). Opening up the Water Poverty Index: co-producing knowledge on the capacity for community water management using the Water Prosperity Index. Society & Natural Resources, 27(3), 265-280
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Opening up the Water Poverty Index: co-producing knowledge on the capacity for community water management using the Water Prosperity Index
2014 (English)In: Society & Natural Resources, ISSN 0894-1920, E-ISSN 1521-0723, ISSN ISSN 0894-1920, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 265-280Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Water Poverty Index is a tool enabling a multisectoral description of the watersituation in an area or region. Many aspects of a society’s capacity to manage water,however, require qualitative and explorative approaches. Additionally, the perceptionsof ‘‘the water poor’’ themselves may differ substantially from expert valuationsbuilt into the Water Poverty Index. The aim of this article is to open up the WaterPoverty Index with a special focus on the capacity to manage water in a robust way.This is done through a process of participatory research and by transforming theWater Poverty Index into a Water Prosperity Index using a local community incentral India as example. By opening up the assessment process, issues empiricallyidentified by community members, researchers, and local nongovernmental organization(NGO) staff can be discussed and qualitatively assessed, resulting in animproved knowledge of the water situation and an approach for participatoryplanning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2014
Keywords
institutional capacity, ‘‘opening up, ’’ participatory research, systems for learning, Water Poverty Index (WPI), Water Prosperity Index (WPIþ)
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-81367 (URN)10.1080/08941920.2013.861553 (DOI)000333484300003 ()
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Available from: 2012-09-12 Created: 2012-09-12 Last updated: 2018-01-12
Hjerpe, M. & Wilk, J. (2014). Practical guidance for vulnerability assessments at the regional and local scale (BalticClimate). In: Andrea Prutsch, Torsten Grothmann, Sabine McCallum, Inke Schauser, Rob Swart (Ed.), Climate change adaptation manual: lessons learned from European and other industrialised countries (pp. 50-56). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Practical guidance for vulnerability assessments at the regional and local scale (BalticClimate)
2014 (English)In: Climate change adaptation manual: lessons learned from European and other industrialised countries / [ed] Andrea Prutsch, Torsten Grothmann, Sabine McCallum, Inke Schauser, Rob Swart, London: Routledge, 2014, p. 50-56Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2014
Keywords
Adaptation; Vulnerability; Climate change; Baltic Sea Region; Assessment, Klimatförändringar, Östersjöländerna
National Category
Social and Economic Geography Other Social Sciences Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-108389 (URN)9780415660341 (ISBN)9780415630405 (ISBN)9780203381267 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-06-27 Created: 2014-06-27 Last updated: 2016-08-10Bibliographically approved
Wilk, J., Hjerpe, M., Jonsson, A., Andre, K. & Glaas, E. (2013). A Guidebook for Integrated Assessment and Management of Vulnerability to Climate Change. Linkoping: Linköping University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Guidebook for Integrated Assessment and Management of Vulnerability to Climate Change
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2013 (English)Book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linkoping: Linköping University Press, 2013. p. 106
Series
CSPR Report (Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research), ISSN 1654-1529 ; 13:01
Series
Nord_Star Working Paper, ISSN 1653-6770 ; 2013-02
Keywords
Climatic changes, Environmental policy, Klimatförändringar, Miljöpolitik
National Category
Environmental Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-104572 (URN)978-91-7519-749-4 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasEU, European Research CouncilSida - Swedish International Development Cooperation AgencyMistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research
Available from: 2014-02-19 Created: 2014-02-19 Last updated: 2016-06-15Bibliographically approved
Wilk, J., Andersson, L. & Warburton, M. (2013). Adaptation to climate change and other stressors among commercial and small-scale South African farmers. Regional Environmental Change, 13(2), 273-286
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adaptation to climate change and other stressors among commercial and small-scale South African farmers
2013 (English)In: Regional Environmental Change, ISSN 1436-3798, E-ISSN 1436-378X, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 273-286Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Commercial and small-scale farmers in South Africa are exposed to many challenges. Interviews with 44 farmers in the upper Thukela basin, KwaZulu-Natal, were conducted to identify common and specific challenges for the two groups and adaptive strategies for dealing with the effects of climate and other stressors. This work was conducted as part of a larger participatory project with local stakeholders to develop a local adaptation plan for coping with climate variability and change. Although many challenges related to exposure to climate variability and change, weak agricultural policies, limited governmental support, and theft were common to both farming communities, their adaptive capacities were vastly different. Small-scale farmers were more vulnerable due to difficulties to finance the high input costs of improved seed varieties and implements, limited access to knowledge and agricultural techniques for water and soil conservation and limited customs of long-term planning. In addition to temperature and drought-related challenges, small-scale farmers were concerned about soil erosion, water logging and livestock diseases, challenges for which the commercial farmers already had efficient adaptation strategies in place. The major obstacle hindering commercial farmers with future planning was the lack of clear directives from the government, for example, with regard to issuing of water licences and land reform. Enabling agricultural communities to procure sustainable livelihoods requires implementation of strategies that address the common and specific challenges and strengthen the adaptive capacity of both commercial and small-scale farmers. Identified ways forward include knowledge transfer within and across farming communities, clear governmental directives and targeted locally adapted finance programmes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2013
Keywords
climate change, adaptive capacity, small-scale farmers, sustainable agriculture, water resources management, vulnerability, South Africa
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-89158 (URN)10.1007/s10113-012-0323-4 (DOI)000316782500005 ()
Projects
Participatory Modelling for Assessment of Local Impact of Climate Variability and Change on Water Resources
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Available from: 2013-02-24 Created: 2013-02-24 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Andersson, L., Wilk, J., Graham, P. L. & Warburton, M. (2013). Design and test of a model-assisted participatory process for the formulation of a local climate adaptation plan. Climate and Development, 5(3), 217-228
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design and test of a model-assisted participatory process for the formulation of a local climate adaptation plan
2013 (English)In: Climate and Development, ISSN 1756-5529, E-ISSN 1756-5537, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 217-228Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article presents the design and testing of a model-assisted participatory process for the formulation of a local adaptation plan to climate change. The pilot study focused on small-scale and commercial agriculture, water supply, housing, wildlife, livestock and biodiversity in the Thukela River basin, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The methodology was based on stakeholders identifying and ranking the severity of climate-related challenges, and downscaled stakeholder-identified information provided by modellers, with the aim of addressing possible changes of exposure in the future. The methodology enables the integration of model-based information with experience and visions based on local realities. It includes stakeholders own assessments of their vulnerability to prevailing climate variability and the severity, if specified, of climate-related problems that may occur more often in the future. The methodology made it possible to identify the main issues to focus on in the adaptation plan, including barriers to adaptation. We make recommendations for how to design a model-assisted participatory process, emphasizing the need for transparency, to recognize the interests of the stakeholders, good advance planning, local relevance, involvement of local champions, and adaptation of Information material to each groups previous experience and understanding.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor and Francis: STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Titles, 2013
Keywords
adaptation, climate change, hydrology, participation, Africa
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-100501 (URN)10.1080/17565529.2013.812955 (DOI)000324365900005 ()
Available from: 2013-11-08 Created: 2013-11-08 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Wilk, J. & Jonsson, A. (2013). From Water Poverty to Water Prosperity—A More Participatory Approach to Studying Local Water Resources Management. Water resources management, 27(3), 695-713
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Water Poverty to Water Prosperity—A More Participatory Approach to Studying Local Water Resources Management
2013 (English)In: Water resources management, ISSN 0920-4741, E-ISSN 1573-1650, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 695-713Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Water Poverty Index (WPI), a tool designed for integrated analysis of water issues, was set-up in a community in Madhya Pradesh, India through a transparent and participatory process. Though the aim of the WPI is to primarily use existing statistical data, quantitative information from census and local records was combined with qualitative data from community interviews and participatory exercises. The inclusion of community chosen indicators and the adjustment of values so that higher numbers represent water prosperity rather than water poverty, led to the Water Prosperity Index (WPI+). The WPI + score was contrasted with the WPI at community level. It was also calculated for two community areas with different caste and socio-economic characteristics and weighted separately according to water issues prioritized by men and women. The WPI + revealed a great difference in water access between the two areas and in prioritized issues between men and women illustrating the importance of appropriate spatial representation and gender sensitive assessments for revealing important disparities. Results also showed that highly aggregated data hide these differences making it more difficult to target the most vulnerable groups when planning measures to increase equitable water allocation. While quantitative data reveal an important perspective of the water situation, qualitative data about adequacy of resources, services or institutions, improve understanding of which issues to prioritize. A valid and useful community water index must be based on representative participation, transparency and local influence on the methodology and subsequent results.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2013
Keywords
Water Poverty Index (WPI) ; Water resources management ; Stakeholder participation ; India ; Participatory processes ; IWRM
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-89159 (URN)10.1007/s11269-012-0209-8 (DOI)
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Available from: 2013-02-24 Created: 2013-02-24 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Cassidy, L., Wilk, J., Kgathi, D., Bendsen, H. & Ngwenya, B. (2011). Indigenous Knowledge, Livelihoods and Government Policy. In: Kgathi, D.L., Ngwenya, B.N. and Darkoh, M.K.B. (Ed.), Rural Livelihoods, Risk and Political Economy of Access to Natural Resources in the Okavango Delta, Botswana: . Nova Publishers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indigenous Knowledge, Livelihoods and Government Policy
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2011 (English)In: Rural Livelihoods, Risk and Political Economy of Access to Natural Resources in the Okavango Delta, Botswana / [ed] Kgathi, D.L., Ngwenya, B.N. and Darkoh, M.K.B., Nova Publishers , 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The Okavango Delta, a globally renowned wetland, is characterized by a mosaic of meandering watercourses, floodplains and islands, and is home to a variety of wildlife and vegetation species. It is a major source of livelihoods for the local communities and also an important attraction for tourism, the second most important economic activity in Botswana after diamonds, contributing 5% to the gross domestic product (GDP). As a globally renowned Ramsar Site and major tourist attraction, the Okavango Delta is a resource of national, regional and international importance. This book examines the results of empirical micro-level studies undertaken in the Okavango Delta and contributes to the formulation of relevant policies for sustainable development in the Okavango Delta. (Imprint: Nova Press)

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nova Publishers, 2011
Keywords
IWRM, Okavango Delta, natural resource management, rural livelihoods
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-66481 (URN)978-1-61122-699-7 (ISBN)
Projects
WERRD - EU-Report
Available from: 2011-03-16 Created: 2011-03-16 Last updated: 2018-01-12
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