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Adolfsson, Ann-Sofie
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Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Adolfsson, A.-S. & Larsson, P.-G. (2010). Applicability of general grief theory to Swedish women’s experiences after early miscarriage, with factor analysis of Bonanno´s taxonomy, using the Perinatal Grief Scale.. Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, 115(3), 201-209
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Applicability of general grief theory to Swedish women’s experiences after early miscarriage, with factor analysis of Bonanno´s taxonomy, using the Perinatal Grief Scale.
2010 (English)In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, Vol. 115, no 3, p. 201-209Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. Grief is a normal phenomenon but showing great variation depending on cultural and personal features. Bonanno and Kaltman have nonetheless proposed five aspects of normal grief. The aim of this study was to investigate if women with miscarriage experience normal grief.

Material and methods. Content analyses of 25 transcribed conversations with women 4 weeks after their early miscarriages were classified depending on the meaning-bearing units according to Bonanno and Kaltman's categories. In the factor analyses, these categories were compared with the Perinatal Grief Scale and women's age, number of children and number of miscarriages, and gestational weeks.

Results. Women with miscarriage fulfill the criteria for having normal grief according to Bonanno and Kaltman. All of the 25 women had meaning-bearing units that were classified as cognitive disorganization, dysphoria, and health deficits, whereas disrupted social and occupational functioning and positive aspects of bereavement were represented in 22 of 25 women. From the factor analysis, there are no differences in the expression of the intensity of the grief, irrespective of whether or not the women were primiparous, younger, or had suffered a first miscarriage.

Conclusion. Women's experience of grief after miscarriage is similar to general grief after death. After her loss, the woman must have the possibility of expressing and working through her grief before she can finish her pregnancy emotionally. The care-giver must facilitate this process and accept that the intensity of the grief is not dependent on the woman's age, or her number of earlier miscarriages.

Keywords
Content analysis, factor analysis, general grief theory, miscarriage, perinatal grief scale, women
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13810 (URN)10.3109/03009731003739851 (DOI)000281013000008 ()
Note
On the day of the defence day the status of this article was Submitted.Available from: 2006-04-03 Created: 2006-04-03 Last updated: 2010-09-03
Eriksson, K., Adolfsson, A.-S., Forsum, U. & Larsson, P.-G. (2010). The prevalence of BV in the population on the Åland Islands during a 15-year period. APMIS, 118(11), 903-908
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The prevalence of BV in the population on the Åland Islands during a 15-year period
2010 (English)In: APMIS, ISSN 0903-4641, Vol. 118, no 11, p. 903-908Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study was to describe the prevalence and age distribution of bacterial vaginosis (BV) during an observation period of 15 years in a population study with cross-sectional samples of adult women living on the Aland Islands. The Aland Islands form an archipelago in the Baltic Sea and are a province of Finland. Every fifth year, specific age groups in the adult female population are invited to participate in a screening program for early diagnosis of cervical cancer using a papanicolaou (PAP)-stained vaginal smear. Women in the age groups of 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, and 60 years are called each year. BV diagnosis of the PAP-stained smears uses the classification according to Nugent. The PAP-stained smears from the screening program of cervical cancer 1993, 1998, 2003, and 2008 were used in this study. A total of 3456 slides were investigated and 271 women could be followed for the 15-year observation period. The prevalence of BV declined from 15.6% in 1993 to 8.6% in 2008. The highest prevalence occurred among the age groups of 35 and 50 years. Among the 271 women who could be followed for the 15-year observation period, two-third showed normal/intermediate flora and one-third were infected with BV at least once. As this is a cross-sectional population study spanning 15 years, the prevalence of BV in the female adult population of the Aland Islands can be estimated. The prevalence has declined between 1993 and 2008 from 15.6% to 8.6%.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 2010
Keywords
BV, prevalence, population study, diagnostics, PAP smear
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-61210 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0463.2010.02678.x (DOI)000283161100012 ()
Available from: 2010-11-05 Created: 2010-11-05 Last updated: 2011-06-08Bibliographically approved
Adolfsson, A.-S. & Larsson, P.-G. (2006). Cumulative incidence of previous spontaneous abortion in Sweden 1983-2003: A register study. Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica, 85(6), 741-747
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cumulative incidence of previous spontaneous abortion in Sweden 1983-2003: A register study
2006 (English)In: Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, Vol. 85, no 6, p. 741-747Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim. The aim of this study is to find out how common miscarriages are among women who have delivered a child.

Methods. The numbers of deliveries and miscarriages were extracted from the Swedish Medical Birth Register between 1983 and 2003. Linear regression was performed in order to investigate whether the increasing mean age of mothers or differences in pregnancy identification methods could explain the increased frequency of miscarriage.

Results. The reported number of miscarriages increased each year during the 21-year period, with a marked increase between 1991 and 1993 and only a slight increase during the final 10 years. For primiparous women, the frequency of reported miscarriages per delivery increased from 8.6% in 1983 to 13.9% in 2003. The corresponding figures for 2-parous women showed an increase from 14.5% to 21.3% respectively. Women aged 30-34 years had an odds ratio of 1.43 (95% CI 1.40-1.45) to suffer spontaneous abortion compared to the age group 25-29 years. Linear regression showed that an increase in mean age at delivery could only partly explain the increase in the frequency of reported miscarriages. A possible explanation could be differences in methods of identifying early pregnancy.

Conclusion. Of all women who deliver a child, nearly 20% have experienced previous miscarriage. The increased mean age of women could only explain a small portion of the seen increase in miscarriage. The marked increase from 1991 to 1993 is interesting. Possible reasons for the increase are discussed.

Keywords
Miscarriage; register study; retrospective study; spontaneous abortion; Medical Birth Register
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13806 (URN)10.1080/00016340600627022 (DOI)
Available from: 2006-04-03 Created: 2006-04-03
Adolfsson, A., Berterö, C. & Larsson, P.-G. (2006). Effect of a structured follow-up visit to a midwife on women with early miscarriage: A randomized study. Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica, 85(3), 330-335
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of a structured follow-up visit to a midwife on women with early miscarriage: A randomized study
2006 (English)In: Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, Vol. 85, no 3, p. 330-335Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. Women's grief after miscarriage is substantial and important. Women who experience early miscarriage do not constitute a homogenous group. The aim of this study is to measure whether a structured follow-up visit to a midwife (group 1) at 21-28 days after early miscarriage could reduce the women's grief, measured using the perinatal grief scale Swedish short version (PGS) after a further 3 months (i.e. 4 months after the miscarriage), compared to a regular follow-up visit to a midwife (group 2). Methods. We performed an open randomized study of women who experienced early miscarriage (n = 88). The midwife's attitude in group 1 came from Swanson science theory of midwifery. In group 2, the women were offered only the ordinary type of consultation at a regular visit. A questionnaire with the PGS was used in both groups. Four months after the miscarriage, a second questionnaire with the same perinatal grief scale was sent by post. Results. There was a 30% greater reduction in grief in group 1 than that in group 2, when comparing the first and second measurements (not significant). The biggest differences were in the subscales active grief and difficulty in coping. Women with the subdiagnosis missed abortions had, as a group, significantly higher PGS scores at both visits, especially in active grief and difficulty in coping, regardless of the type of follow-up visit. Conclusions. A structured follow-up visit did not, in comparison with a regular follow-up visit, imply any significant reduction in grief as measured using the PGS scale. However, the subgroup missed abortion had more extensive grief than the other women with miscarriage. Structured follow-up visits are not imperative for all women with early miscarriage.

Keywords
Early miscarriage; grief; midwife; support; treatment
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13809 (URN)10.1080/00016340500539376 (DOI)
Available from: 2006-04-03 Created: 2006-04-03 Last updated: 2013-09-12
Adolfsson, A.-S. (2006). Miscarriage: Women’s Experience and its Cumulative Incidence. (Doctoral dissertation). Institutionen för molekylär och klinisk medicin
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Miscarriage: Women’s Experience and its Cumulative Incidence
2006 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Many women experience miscarriage every year. Every fourth woman who has given birth reports that she has previous experience of miscarriage. In a study of all women in the Swedish Medical Birth Register 1983-2003, we found that the number of cases of self reported miscarriage had increased in Sweden during this 21 year period. This increase can be explained by the introduction of sensitive pregnancy tests around 1990, as well as an increase in the mean age of the mothers, by approximately 3 years, during the observation period. The risk of miscarriage is 13% with the first child. With subsequent pregnancies, the risk of miscarriage is 8%, 6% and 4% with the second, third and fourth child, respectively.

Thirteen of these women who had suffered a recent miscarriage were interviewed four months later, and their feelings of guilt and emptiness were explored. Their experience was that they wanted their questions to be answered, and that they wanted others to treat them as the mothers to be that they felt themselves to be. They also experienced the need for time to grieve their loss.

Measurement of grief by means of the Perinatal Grief Scale (PGS) is used in research but has also been proposed for clinical use. We have translated this psychological instrument to Swedish, back-translated and tested it in a small pilot study. In a randomized controlled study, women with early miscarriage were allocated, either to a structured visit (study group) or a regular visit (control group) to a midwife. The structured visit was conducted according to the Swanson caring theory. We could conclude that the structured visit had no significant effect on grief compared to the regular visit, as measured using the PGS. However, women with the sub-diagnosis missed abortion have significantly more grief four months after early miscarriage, regardless of visit type.

We also performed a content analysis of the tape-recorded structured follow-up visit. The code-key used was Bonanno and Kaltman’s general grief categorization. Women’s expression of grief after miscarriage was found to be very similar to the grief experienced following the death of a relative. Furthermore, the grief was found to be independent of number of children, women’s age, or earlier experience of miscarriage.

Conclusions: Every fourth woman who gives birth reports that she has also experienced early miscarriage. The experience of these women is that they have suffered a substantial loss and their reaction is grief similar to that experienced following the death of a relative.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institutionen för molekylär och klinisk medicin, 2006
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 939
Keywords
Miscarriage, Grief, Perinatal Grief Scale in Swedish, Follow-up visit to midwife, Medical Birth Register, Spontaneous abortion
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-6204 (URN)91-85497-76-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2006-04-07, Berzeliussalen, Hälsouniversitetet, Linköping, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note
On the day of the public defence of the doctoral thesis the status of article III was In Press and article IV was In Press.Available from: 2006-04-03 Created: 2006-04-03 Last updated: 2009-08-22
Adolfsson, A.-S. & Larsson, P.-G. (2006). Translation of the short version of the Perinatal Grief Scale into Swedish. Scandinavian journal of caring sciences, 20(3), 269-273
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Translation of the short version of the Perinatal Grief Scale into Swedish
2006 (English)In: Scandinavian journal of caring sciences, ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 269-273Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Women's emotions and grief after miscarriage are influenced not only by the context in which the miscarriage occurred but also by their past experience, the circumstances around the miscarriage and their future prospects. Their emotions therefore express a specific form of grief. Normally the time needed to work through the loss varies. A number of different scales, measuring women's emotions and grief after miscarriage have been published. One instrument that measures the specific grief, such as the grief after miscarriage is the Perinatal Grief Scale (PGS) that was designed to measure grief after perinatal loss and has good reliability and validity.

Aims: The purpose of this study was to translate the PGS into Swedish and to use the translation in a small pilot study.

Material and method: The original short version of the PGS was first translated from English into Swedish and then back-translated into English, using different translators. During translation and back-translation, not only the linguistic and grammatical aspects were considered but also cultural differences. The Likert 5-point and a 10-point scale were tested in a pilot study where 12 volunteers anonymously answered the PGS twice. The intra-personal correlations were compared and analysed with weighted κ-coefficient.

Findings: In all, five different versions were tested before the final Swedish version was established. The weighted κ-coefficient for the volunteers was 0.58, which is regarded as representing good reproducibility.

Conclusion: The PGS was translated successfully into Swedish and could be used in a Swedish population. As this work is rather time-consuming we therefore wish to publish the Swedish version so that it may be used by other researchers.

Keywords
translation, Perinatal Grief Scale, miscarriage, grief, spontaneous abortion
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13808 (URN)10.1111/j.1471-6712.2006.00404.x (DOI)
Available from: 2006-04-03 Created: 2006-04-03 Last updated: 2010-05-17
Adolfsson, A.-S., Larsson, P.-G., Wijma, B. & Berterö, C. (2004). Guilt and emptiness: Women’s experiences of miscarriage. Health Care for Women International, 25(6), 543-560
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Guilt and emptiness: Women’s experiences of miscarriage
2004 (English)In: Health Care for Women International, ISSN 0739-9332, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 543-560Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Women who lose an early pregnancy are shocked when they are first given the information that they have miscarried. Later they feel guilt and emptiness. Heideggerian interpretive phenomenology has been used with 13 women from southwest Sweden to uncover their lived experience of miscarriage. Women plan their future with a child during early pregnancy. When miscarriage occurs it is not a gore, an embryo, or a fetus they lose, it is their child. They feel that they are the cause of the miscarriage through something they have done, eaten, or thought. They feel abandonment and they grieve for their profound loss; they are actually in bereavement.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13807 (URN)10.1080/07399330490444821 (DOI)
Available from: 2006-04-03 Created: 2006-04-03 Last updated: 2018-11-15
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