liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 97) Show all publications
Lundqvist, J., Andersson, A., Johannisson, A., Lavonen, E., Mandava, G., Kylin, H., . . . Oskarsson, A. (2019). Innovative drinking water treatment techniques reduce thedisinfection-induced oxidative stress and genotoxic activity. Water Research, 5, 183-192
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Innovative drinking water treatment techniques reduce thedisinfection-induced oxidative stress and genotoxic activity
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 5, p. 183-192Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Disinfection of drinking water using chlorine can lead to the formation of genotoxic by-products whenchlorine reacts with natural organic matter (NOM). A vast number of such disinfection by-products(DBPs) have been identified, making it almost impossible to routinely monitor all DBPs with chemicalanalysis. In this study, a bioanalytical approach was used, measuring oxidative stress (Nrf2 activity),genotoxicity (micronucleus test), and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation to evaluate an innovativewater treatment process, including suspended ion exchange, ozonation, in-line coagulation,ceramic microfiltration, and granular activated carbon. Chlorination was performed in laboratory scaleafter each step in the treatment process in order to investigate the effect of each treatment process to theformation of DBPs. Suspended ion exchange had a high capacity to remove dissolved organic carbon(DOC) and to decrease UV absorbance and Nrf2 activity in non-chlorinated water. High-dose chlorination(10 mg Cl2 L-1) of raw water caused a drastic induction of Nrf2 activity, which was decreased by 70% inwater chlorinated after suspended ion exchange. Further reduction of Nrf2 activity following chlorinationwas achieved by ozonation and the concomitant treatment steps. The ozonation treatment resulted indecreased Nrf2 activity in spite of unchanged DOC levels. However, a strong correlation was found betweenUV absorbing compounds and Nrf2 activity, demonstrating that Nrf2 inducing DBPs were formedfrom pre-cursors of a specific NOM fraction, constituted of mainly aromatic compounds. Moreover, highdosechlorination of raw water induced genotoxicity. In similarity to the DOC levels, UV absorbance andNrf2 activity, the disinfection-induced genotoxicity was also reduced by each treatment step of theinnovative water treatment technique. AhR activity was observed in the water produced by the conventionalprocess and in the raw water, but the activity was clearly decreased by the ozonation step inthe innovative water treatment process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IWA Publishing, 2019
Keywords
Drinking water, disinfection byproducts, oxidative stress, Nrf2, genotoxicity
National Category
Environmental Sciences Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Occupational Health and Environmental Health Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155072 (URN)10.1016/j.watres.2019.02.052 (DOI)30849732 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062423705 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2013-01077
Available from: 2019-03-12 Created: 2019-03-12 Last updated: 2019-03-20Bibliographically approved
Andersson, A., Harir, M., Gonsior, M., Hertkorn, N., Schmitt-Kopplin, P., Kylin, H., . . . Bastviken, D. (2019). Waterworks-specific composition of drinking water disinfection by-products. Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Waterworks-specific composition of drinking water disinfection by-products
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology, ISSN 2053-1419Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reactions between chemical disinfectants and natural organic matter (NOM) upon drinking water treatment result in formation of potentially harmful disinfection by-products (DBPs). The diversity of DBPs formed is high and a large portion remains unknown. Previous studies have shown that non-volatile DBPs are important, as much of the total toxicity from DBPs has been related to this fraction. To further understand the composition and variation of DBPs associated with this fraction, non-target analysis with ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) was employed to detect DBPs at four Swedish waterworks using different types of raw water and treatments. Samples were collected five times covering a full year. A common group of DBPs formed at all four waterworks was detected, suggesting a similar pool of DBP precursors in all raw waters that might be related to phenolic moieties. However, the largest proportion (64–92%) of the assigned chlorinated and brominated molecular formulae were unique, i.e. were solely found in one of the four waterworks. In contrast, the compositional variations of NOM in the raw waters and samples collected prior to chemical disinfection were rather limited.This indicated that waterworks-specific DBPs presumably originated from matrix effects at the point of disinfection, primarily explained by differences in bromide levels, disinfectants (chlorine versus chloramine) and different relative abundances of isomers among the NOM compositions studied. The large variation of observed DBPs in the toxicologically relevant non-volatile fraction indicates that non-targeted monitoring strategies might be valuable to ensure relevant DBP monitoring in the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Royal Society of Chemistry, 2019
Keywords
Drinking water, Drinking water treatment, Disinfection, Disinfection by-products, DBP, Chlorine, Chloramine, natural organic matter, high resolution mass spectrometry, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, FT-ICR MS, Dricksvatten, Desinfektionsbiprodukter, Klor, Kloramin, Reningsprocesser, Naturligt organiskt material
National Category
Analytical Chemistry Organic Chemistry Environmental Sciences Water Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-156342 (URN)10.1039/c9ew00034h (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2013-1077
Available from: 2019-04-16 Created: 2019-04-16 Last updated: 2019-04-16
Andersson, A., Ashiq, M. J., Shoeb, M., Karlsson, S., Bastviken, D. & Kylin, H. (2018). Evaluating gas chromatography with a halogen-specific detectorfor the determination of disinfection by-products in drinking water. Environmental science and pollution research international, 26, 7305-7314
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluating gas chromatography with a halogen-specific detectorfor the determination of disinfection by-products in drinking water
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 26, p. 7305-7314Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The occurrence of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water has become an issue of concern during the past decades. The DBPs pose health risks and are suspected to cause various cancer forms, be genotoxic and have negative developmental effects. The vast chemical diversity of DBPs makes comprehensive monitoring challenging. Only few of the DBPs are regulated and included in analytical protocols. In this study, a method for simultaneous measurement of 20 DBPs from five different structural classes (both regulated and non-regulated) was investigated and further developed for 11 DBPs using solid phase extraction and gas chromatography coupled with a halogen specific detector (XSD). The XSD was highly selective towards halogenated DBPs, providing chromatograms with little noise. The method allowed detection down to 0.05 µg/L and showed promising results for the simultaneous determination of a range of neutral DBP classes. Compounds from two classes of emerging DBPs, more cytotoxic than the “traditional” regulated DBPs, were successfully determined using this method. However, haloacetic acids (HAAs) should be analyzed separately as some HAA methyl esters may degrade giving false positives of trihalomethanes (THMs). The method was tested on real water samples from two municipal waterworks where the target DBP concentrations were found below the regulatory limits of Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2018
Keywords
Drinking water, Disinfection by-products, Trihalomethanes, Haloacetic acids, Haloacetonitriles, Halogen-specific detector
National Category
Analytical Chemistry Environmental Sciences Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-145402 (URN)10.1007/s11356-018-1419-2 (DOI)29492811 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2013-1077
Available from: 2018-02-28 Created: 2018-02-28 Last updated: 2019-04-05Bibliographically approved
Klaus, M., Geibrink, E., Jonsson, A., Bergstrom, A.-K., Bastviken, D., Laudon, H., . . . Karlsson, J. (2018). Greenhouse gas emissions from boreal inland waters unchanged after forest harvesting. Biogeosciences, 15(18), 5575-5594
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Greenhouse gas emissions from boreal inland waters unchanged after forest harvesting
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Biogeosciences, ISSN 1726-4170, E-ISSN 1726-4189, Vol. 15, no 18, p. 5575-5594Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Forestry practices often result in an increased export of carbon and nitrogen to downstream aquatic systems. Although these losses affect the greenhouse gas (GHG) budget of managed forests, it is unknown if they modify GHG emissions of recipient aquatic systems. To assess this question, air-water fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) were quantified for humic lakes and their inlet streams in four boreal catchments using a before-after control-impact experiment. Two catchments were treated with forest clear-cuts followed by site preparation (18 % and 44 % of the catchment area). GHG fluxes and hydrological and physicochemical water characteristics were measured at multiple locations in lakes and streams at high temporal resolution throughout the summer season over a 4-year period. Both lakes and streams evaded all GHGs. The treatment did not significantly change GHG fluxes in streams or lakes within 3 years after the treatment, despite significant increases of CO2 and CH4 concentrations in hillslope groundwater. Our results highlight that GHGs leaching from forest clear-cuts may be buffered in the riparian zone-stream continuum, likely acting as effective biogeochemical processors and wind shelters to prevent additional GHG evasion via downstream inland waters. These findings are representative of low productive forests located in relatively flat landscapes where forestry practices cause only a limited initial impact on catchment hydrology and biogeochemistry.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Goettingen, Germany: Copernicus GmbH, 2018
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-151781 (URN)10.5194/bg-15-5575-2018 (DOI)000445040900002 ()2-s2.0-85053755561 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Councils Formas [210-2012-1461]; Kempestiftelserna [SMK-1240]; VR [2012-00048]; STINT [2012-2085]; European Research Council [725546]

Available from: 2018-10-08 Created: 2018-10-08 Last updated: 2018-11-12Bibliographically approved
Larsson, M., Truong, X.-b., Björn, A., Ejlertsson, J., Svensson, B., Bastviken, D. & Karlsson, A. (2017). Anaerobic digestion of wastewater from the production of bleached chemical thermo-mechanical pulp: higher methane production for hardwood than softwood. Journal of chemical technology and biotechnology (1986), 2(1), 140-151
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anaerobic digestion of wastewater from the production of bleached chemical thermo-mechanical pulp: higher methane production for hardwood than softwood
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Journal of chemical technology and biotechnology (1986), ISSN 0268-2575, E-ISSN 1097-4660, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 140-151Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Chemical thermo-mechanical pulp (CTMP) mills holds a large biomethane potential in their wastewater. Their broadened market has involved increased bleaching and utilisation of different raw materials. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to obtain and maintain a stable anaerobic digestion (AD) process, with a high methane yield and total organic carbon (TOC) reduction, when digesting CTMP wastewater, from different production protocols including shifts in raw material and bleaching. A lab-scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor was used for the tests.

RESULTS: The variations in raw material (aspen, birch and spruce) and consequently in TOC-loading (3.6-6.6 kg TOC m-3 and day-1) did not affect the UASB process negatively. Methane production values from 360 to 500 NmL g TOC-1 were obtained, with the highest yield for wastewater from the production of birch- followed by aspenand spruce pulp. The acetic acid and fTOC reduction ranged 90 to 95% and 61 to 73%, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: The stable process performance maintained during shifts in raw material for pulp production show that AD is feasible for CTMP mills with a diversified product portfolio. Furthermore, the increased use of hardwood and bleaching will most likely increase their potential as a biomethane producer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
biogas, wastewater treatment, UASB, CTMP, softwood, hardwood
National Category
Water Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122338 (URN)10.1002/jctb.4980 (DOI)000389443600017 ()
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 32802–1
Note

At the time for thesis presentation publication was in status: Manuscript

At the time for thesis presentation manuscript was named: Anaerobic digestion of wastewater from the production of bleached chemical thermo-mechanical pulp: The effect of changes in raw material composition

Funding agencies: Swedish Energy Agency [32802-1]; Scandinavian Biogas Fuels AB; Poyry Sweden AB; BillerudKorsnas AB; Purac AB; SCA

Available from: 2015-10-29 Created: 2015-10-29 Last updated: 2018-10-05Bibliographically approved
Wik, M., Thornton, B. F., Bastviken, D., Uhlbaeck, J. & Crill, P. M. (2016). Biased sampling of methane release from northern lakes: A problem for extrapolation. Geophysical Research Letters, 43(3), 1256-1262
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biased sampling of methane release from northern lakes: A problem for extrapolation
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 1256-1262Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Methane emissions from lakes are widely thought to be highly irregular and difficult to quantify with anything other than numerous distributed measurement stations and long-term sampling campaigns. In spite of this, a large majority of the study sites north of 50 degrees N have been measured over surprisingly short time periods of only one to a few days. Using long-term data from three intensively studied small subarctic lakes, we recommend that measurements of diffusive methane flux and ebullition should be made over at least 11 and 39days scattered throughout the ice-free season using depth-stratified sampling at 3 and 11 or more locations, respectively. We further show that low temporal and spatial resolutions are unlikely to cause overestimates. Therefore, we argue that most sites measured previously are likely underestimated in terms of emission potential. Avoiding these biases seen in much of the contemporary data is crucial to further constrain large-scale methane emissions from northern lakes and ponds.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER GEOPHYSICAL UNION, 2016
Keywords
northern lakes; methane; sampling bias; ebullition; diffusion; subarctic
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127058 (URN)10.1002/2015GL066501 (DOI)000372056600039 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [2007-4547]; Nordic Center of Excellence DEFROST under Nordic Top-Level Research Initiative

Available from: 2016-04-13 Created: 2016-04-13 Last updated: 2018-10-05
Montelius, M., Svensson, T., Lourino-Cabana, B., Thiry, Y. & Bastviken, D. (2016). Chlorination and dechlorination rates in a forest soil: A combined modelling and experimental approach. Science of the Total Environment, 554-555, 203-210
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chlorination and dechlorination rates in a forest soil: A combined modelling and experimental approach
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 554-555, p. 203-210Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract Much of the total pool of chlorine (Cl) in soil consists of naturally produced organic chlorine (Clorg). The chlorination of bulk organic matter at substantial rates has been experimentally confirmed in various soil types. The subsequent fates of Clorg are important for ecosystem Cl cycling and residence times. As most previous research into dechlorination in soils has examined either single substances or specific groups of compounds, we lack information about overall bulk dechlorination rates. Here we assessed bulk organic matter chlorination and dechlorination rates in coniferous forest soil based on a radiotracer experiment conducted under various environmental conditions (additional water, labile organic matter, and ammonium nitrate). Experiment results were used to develop a model to estimate specific chlorination (i.e., fraction of Cl− transformed to Clorg per time unit) and specific dechlorination (i.e., fraction of Clorg transformed to Cl− per time unit) rates. The results indicate that chlorination and dechlorination occurred simultaneously under all tested environmental conditions. Specific chlorination rates ranged from 0.0005 to 0.01 d− 1 and were hampered by nitrogen fertilization but were otherwise similar among the treatments. Specific dechlorination rates were 0.01–0.03 d− 1 and were similar among all treatments. This study finds that soil Clorg levels result from a dynamic equilibrium between the chlorination and rapid dechlorination of some Clorg compounds, while another Clorg pool is dechlorinated more slowly. Altogether, this study demonstrates a highly active Cl cycling in soils.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Chlorine cycling, Chloride, Organic chlorine, Radioactive chlorine-36, Modelling
National Category
Soil Science Environmental Sciences related to Agriculture and Land-use Agricultural and Veterinary sciences Ecology Forest Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125912 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.02.208 (DOI)000373274700022 ()26950634 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies:  EDF, France; National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra), France; Linkoping University, Sweden

Available from: 2016-03-08 Created: 2016-03-08 Last updated: 2018-10-05Bibliographically approved
Wik, M., Varner, R. K., Walter Anthony, K., MacIntyre, S. & Bastviken, D. (2016). Climate-sensitive northern lakes and ponds are critical components of methane release. Nature Geoscience, 9(2), 99-+
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate-sensitive northern lakes and ponds are critical components of methane release
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Nature Geoscience, ISSN 1752-0894, E-ISSN 1752-0908, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 99-+Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lakes and ponds represent one of the largest natural sources of the greenhouse gas methane. By surface area, almost half of these waters are located in the boreal region and northwards. A synthesis of measurements of methane emissions from 733 lakes and ponds north of similar to 50 degrees N, combined with new inventories of inland waters, reveals that emissions from these high latitudes amount to around 16.5 Tg CH4 yr(-1) (12.4 Tg CH4-C yr(-1)). This estimate - from lakes and ponds alone - is equivalent to roughly two-thirds of the inverse model calculation of all natural methane sources in the region. Thermokarst water bodies have received attention for their high emission rates, but we find that post-glacial lakes are a larger regional source due to their larger areal extent. Water body depth, sediment type and ecoclimatic region are also important in explaining variation in methane fluxes. Depending on whether warming and permafrost thaw cause expansion or contraction of lake and pond areal coverage, we estimate that annual water body emissions will increase by 20-54% before the end of the century if ice-free seasons are extended by 20 days. We conclude that lakes and ponds are a dominant methane source at high northern latitudes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2016
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125680 (URN)10.1038/NGEO2578 (DOI)000369324600010 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|National Science Foundation (NSF) Vulnerability of Permafrost Carbon Research Coordination Network [955713]; NSF [1331083]; Climate in Cryosphere programme; World Climate Research Programme via Permafrost Carbon Network; Department of Geological Sciences, Stockholm University; Swedish Research Council (VR) [2007-4547]; Nordic Center of Excellence DEFROST under Nordic Top-Level Research Initiative; U.S. NSF [ANS-1204267, DEB 0919603]; Linkoping University; VR

Available from: 2016-03-02 Created: 2016-02-29 Last updated: 2018-10-05
Peixoto, R. B., Marotta, H., Bastviken, D. & Enrich Prast, A. (2016). Floating Aquatic Macrophytes Can Substantially Offset Open Water CO2 Emissions from Tropical Floodplain Lake Ecosystems. Ecosystems (New York. Print), 19(4), 724-736
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Floating Aquatic Macrophytes Can Substantially Offset Open Water CO2 Emissions from Tropical Floodplain Lake Ecosystems
2016 (English)In: Ecosystems (New York. Print), ISSN 1432-9840, E-ISSN 1435-0629, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 724-736Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Tropical floodplain lake ecosystems are recognized as important sources of carbon (C) from the water to the atmosphere. They receive large amounts of organic matter and nutrients from the watershed, leading to intense net heterotrophy and carbon dioxide (CO2) emission from open waters. However, the role of extensive stands of floating macrophytes colonizing floodplains areas is still neglected in assessments of net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE). We assessed rates of air-lake CO2 flux using static chambers in both open waters and waters covered by the widespread floating aquatic macrophyte (water hyacinth; Eichornia sp.) in two tropical floodplain lakes in Pantanal, Brazil during different hydrological seasons. In both lakes, areas colonized by floating macrophytes were a net CO2 sink during all seasons. In contrast, open waters emitted CO2, with higher emissions during the rising and high water periods. Our results indicate that the lake NEE can be substantially overestimated (fivefold or more in the studied lakes) if the carbon fixation by macrophytes is not considered. The contribution of these plants can lead to neutral or negative NEE (that is, net uptake of CO2) on a yearly basis. This highlights the importance of floating aquatic macrophytes for the C balance in shallow lakes and extensive floodplain areas.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2016
Keywords
CO2 fluxes; littoral zone; aquatic plants; Pantanal; net ecosystem exchange; Eichornia sp
National Category
Environmental Sciences related to Agriculture and Land-use
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129141 (URN)10.1007/s10021-016-9964-3 (DOI)000376283100012 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|CNPq; Capes; FAPERJ; "Jovem Cientista do Nosso Estado; "Cientista do Nosso Estado; "Science without Borders STINT/Capes" [BEX 7937/14-8]; STINT; VR

Available from: 2016-06-13 Created: 2016-06-13 Last updated: 2018-10-05
Gålfalk, M. & Bastviken, D. (2016). Making methane visible. Nature Climate Change, 6, 426-430
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Making methane visible
2016 (English)In: Nature Climate Change, ISSN 1758-678X, E-ISSN 1758-6798, Vol. 6, p. 426-430Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Methane (CH4) is one of the most important greenhouse gases, and an important energy carrier in biogas and natural gas. Its large-scale emission patterns have been unpredictable and the source and sink distributions are poorly constrained. Remote assessment of CH4 with high sensitivity at a m2 spatial resolution would allow detailed mapping of the near-ground distribution and anthropogenic sources in landscapes but has hitherto not been possible. Here we show that CH4gradients can be imaged on the <m2 scale at ambient levels (~1.8 ppm) and filmed using optimized infrared (IR) hyperspectral imaging. Our approach allows both spectroscopic confirmation and quantification for all pixels in an imaged scene simultaneously. It also has the ability to map fluxes for dynamic scenes. This approach to mapping boundary layer CH4 offers a unique potential way to improve knowledge about greenhouse gases in landscapes and a step towards resolving source–sink attribution and scaling issues.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2016
Keywords
Methane, Greenhouse gases, Remote sensing
National Category
Environmental Sciences Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127139 (URN)10.1038/nclimate2877 (DOI)000373060000023 ()
Note

Funding agencies: Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation [KAW 2010.0126]; Swedish Research Council V.R [VR 2012-48]

Available from: 2016-04-15 Created: 2016-04-15 Last updated: 2018-10-05
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0038-2152

Search in DiVA

Show all publications