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Dahlbäck, Nils
Publications (10 of 38) Show all publications
Ziemke, T., Arvola, M., Dahlbäck, N. & Billing, E. (Eds.). (2018). Proceedings of the 14th SweCog Conference: Linköping 2018, 11-12 October. Paper presented at Swecog 2018, the 14th Swecog conference, Linköping, Sweden, October 11-12, 2018. Skövde: University of Skövde
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Proceedings of the 14th SweCog Conference: Linköping 2018, 11-12 October
2018 (English)Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Welcome to SweCog 2018 in Linköping!

This booklet contains the program and short papers for oral and poster presentations at SweCog 2018, this year’s edition of the annual conference of the Swedish Cognitive Science Society. Following the SweCog tradition and its aim to support networking among researchers in cognitive science and related areas, contributions cover a wide spectrum of research.

A trend in recent years, also reflected in this year’s conference program, is an increasing number of contributions that deal with different types of autonomous technologies, such as social robots, virtual agents or automated vehicles, and in particular people’s interaction with such systems. This clearly is a growing research area of high societal relevance, where cognitive science - with its interdisciplinary and human-centered approach - can make significant contributions.

We look forward to two exciting days in Linköping, and we thank the many people who have contributed to the organization of this year’s SweCog conference, in particular of course all authors and reviewers! The organization of SweCog 2018 has been supported by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Culture Communication (IKK), and the Department of Computer Information Science (IDA) at Linköpping University, as well as Cambio Healthcare Systems and Visual Sweden.

Tom Ziemke, Mattias Arvola, Nils Dahlbäc and Erik Billing

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Skövde: University of Skövde, 2018. p. 30
Series
Skövde University Studies in Informatics, ISSN 1653-2325 ; 2018:1
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-157110 (URN)9789198366730 (ISBN)
Conference
Swecog 2018, the 14th Swecog conference, Linköping, Sweden, October 11-12, 2018
Available from: 2019-05-28 Created: 2019-05-28 Last updated: 2019-05-28Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, I.-M. & Dahlbäck, N. (2014). Driving with a Speech Interaction System: Effect of Personality on Performance and Attitude of Driver. In: HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION: ADVANCED INTERACTION MODALITIES AND TECHNIQUES, PT II: . Paper presented at 16th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) (pp. 417-428). SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN, 8511
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Driving with a Speech Interaction System: Effect of Personality on Performance and Attitude of Driver
2014 (English)In: HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION: ADVANCED INTERACTION MODALITIES AND TECHNIQUES, PT II, SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN , 2014, Vol. 8511, p. 417-428Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Personality has a huge effect on how we communicate and interact with others. This study is one in a series of three that investigates how a speech based in-car system matched with dominant and submissive drivers affects performance and attitude drivers. The study was conducted with 30 participants at Linkoping University in Sweden. Data show that using a voice that combines feature from submissive and dominant speech patterns work well for both dominant and submissive drivers. The voice showed the same performance gain as when matching car voice personality with personality of driver, without the negative attitude ratings associated with the submissive car voice found in previous studies. Drivers assessment of the car system show that even though both dominant and submissive drivers find the system helpful, dominant drivers find the system more annoying and more likely to turn the system off. Design implications of in-vehicle systems are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN, 2014
Series
Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743, E-ISSN 1611-3349 ; 8511
Keywords
In-car System; Driving Simulator; Driving Performance; Speech system; Attitude; Personality; Dominant and Submissive
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112074 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-07230-2_40 (DOI)000342751800040 ()978-3-319-07230-2 (ISBN)978-3-319-07229-6 (ISBN)
Conference
16th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (HCI)
Available from: 2014-11-13 Created: 2014-11-13 Last updated: 2018-02-09
Berggren, P., Johansson, B., Svensson, E., Baroutsi, N. & Dahlbäck, N. (2014). Statistical modelling of team training in a microworld study. In: Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting: . Paper presented at HFES (pp. 894-898). Sage Publications, 58
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Statistical modelling of team training in a microworld study
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, Sage Publications, 2014, Vol. 58, p. 894-898Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A command and control environment is a dynamic and complex setting with complicated technical systems where teams of operators interact to reach shared goals. This study presents an experiment in which we, by means of Structural Equation Modeling (SEM), explain the relations between basic concepts of command and control environments: mental workload, frustration, situational awareness, and performance. This paper reports a LISREL analysis of the Baroutsi, Berggren, Nählinder, & Johansson (2013) data. From that data, a new latent variable “Frustration” emerges, which now can be included in the model.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2014
Series
Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, ISSN 1071-1813
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117742 (URN)10.1177/1541931214581188 (DOI)
Conference
HFES
Available from: 2015-05-07 Created: 2015-05-07 Last updated: 2017-02-21
Nygårdhs, S., Lundkvist, S.-O., Andersson, J. & Dahlbäck, N. (2014). The effect of different delineator post configurations on driver speed in night-time traffic: A driving simulator study. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 72, 341-350
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of different delineator post configurations on driver speed in night-time traffic: A driving simulator study
2014 (English)In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 72, p. 341-350Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study was to investigate how different delineator post configurations affect driver speed in night-time traffic. In addition, the potential speed effect of introducing a secondary task was investigated. The study was carried out in a car simulator on a road stretch including straight road sections as well as curves with different radii. Fourteen drivers participated in the study and the results show that absence of delineator posts leads to reduced speed. However, provided that there are delineator posts continuously present along the road, the overall driver speed is basically the same, regardless of the spacing between the delineator posts. The results also imply that to reduce driver speed in curves with small radius, using more compact spacing of posts in these curves as compared to in curves with a larger radius, could be a potential strategy. Additionally, the speed reducing effect of a secondary task was only prevailing where the task was initiated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keywords
Delineator posts; Simulator study; Night-time traffic; Distraction; Driver speed
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112463 (URN)10.1016/j.aap.2014.07.023 (DOI)000343843700035 ()25118126 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-11-28 Created: 2014-11-28 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Berggren, P., Johansson, B. J., Baroutsi, N. & Dahlbäck, N. (2014). The shared priorities measure as a way of assessing team strategic awareness – a bridge between self-assessment and the deep blue sea of field recordings. In: Stary, Christian (Ed.), ECCE '14 Proceedings of the 2014 European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics: . Paper presented at ECCE. ACM Press (13)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The shared priorities measure as a way of assessing team strategic awareness – a bridge between self-assessment and the deep blue sea of field recordings
2014 (English)In: ECCE '14 Proceedings of the 2014 European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics / [ed] Stary, Christian, ACM Press, 2014, no 13Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Objective, easy to use, easy to comprehend, high face- validity assessment methods for measuring shared awareness in teams are hard to find. This paper describes an experiment where a new measure called Shared Priorities, which is based on ranking of self-generated strategic items, is tested. Trained teams were compared to non-trained teams in a dynamic problem-solving task in terms of performance and shared awareness. The shared priorities measure was used alongside other, well-documented measures of team awareness based on self-rating. The results show that the Shared Priorities measure correlate with performance and could also distinguish between trained and non-trained teams. However, the Shared Priorities measure did not correlate with the other team measures, suggesting that it captures a different quality of team work than the self-rating measures. Further, the shared priorities measure was found to be easily administered and gained a high user acceptance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM Press, 2014
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117708 (URN)10.1145/2637248.2637265 (DOI)978-1-4503-2874-6 (ISBN)
Conference
ECCE
Available from: 2015-05-07 Created: 2015-05-07 Last updated: 2016-08-22
Rankin, A., Dahlbäck, N. & Lundberg, J. (2013). A case study of factor influencing role improvisation in crisis response teams. Cognition, Technology & Work, 15(1), 79-93
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A case study of factor influencing role improvisation in crisis response teams
2013 (English)In: Cognition, Technology & Work, ISSN 1435-5558, E-ISSN 1435-5566, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 79-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Common characteristics of crisis situations are ambiguous and unplanned for events. The need for improvised roles can therefore be an imperative factor for the success of an operation. The aim of this study is to deepen the understanding of the processes taking place during improvised work ‘‘as it happens’’. A case study of a crisis management team at work is presented and provides an in-depth analysis of the information and communication flow of persons acting in improvised roles, including con- textual factors influencing the task at hand. The analysis suggests that three main factors lay behind decreased per- formance by the team when some of its members were forced to take on roles for which they lacked professional training; lack of language skills, lack of domain knowledge and insufficient organizational structure of the tasks. Based on the observations from this case study, we suggest three ways of improving a team’s performance and hence resil- ience when forced to improvise due to lack of personnel in one or more required competence areas. These are training to take on the responsibility for tasks or roles outside ones professional area of specialization, developing formal routines for changes in roles and tasks and developing and using tools and routines for information sharing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2013
Keywords
Role improvisation, Crisis management, Resilience engineering, Organizational improvisation, Episode analysis
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-80311 (URN)10.1007/s10111-011-0186-3 (DOI)000313737400010 ()
Available from: 2012-08-23 Created: 2012-08-23 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Dahlbäck, N., Kristiansson (Forsblad), M. & Stjernberg, F. (2013). Distributed Remembering Through Active Structuring of Activities and Environments. Review of Philosophy and Psychology, 4(1), 153-165
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distributed Remembering Through Active Structuring of Activities and Environments
2013 (English)In: Review of Philosophy and Psychology, ISSN 1878-5158, E-ISSN 1878-5166, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 153-165Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we consider a few actual cases of mnemonic strategies among older subjects (older than 65). The cases are taken from an ethnographic study, examining how elderly adults cope with cognitive decline. We believe that these cases illustrate that the process of remembering in many cases involve a complex distributed web of processes involving both internal or intracranial and external sources. Our cases illustrate that the nature of distributed remembering is shaped by and subordinated to the dynamic characteristics of the on-going activity and to our minds suggest that research on memory and distributed cognition should focus on the process of remembering through detailed descriptions and analysis of naturally occurring situations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2013
Keywords
memory, distributed cognition
National Category
Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-91501 (URN)10.1007/s13164-012-0122-3 (DOI)
Available from: 2013-04-26 Created: 2013-04-25 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Skagerlund, K., Kirsh, D. & Dahlbäck, N. (2012). Maps in the Head and Maps in the Hand. In: Naomi Miyake, David Peebles, Richard P. Cooper (Ed.), Proceedings of the 34th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society: . Paper presented at 34th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2012), 1-4 August 2012, Sapporo, Japan (pp. 2339-2344). Cognitive Science Society 2012
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maps in the Head and Maps in the Hand
2012 (English)In: Proceedings of the 34th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society / [ed] Naomi Miyake, David Peebles, Richard P. Cooper, Cognitive Science Society 2012 , 2012, p. 2339-2344Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Using the perspective of situated cognition we studied how people interact with a physical map to help them navigate through an unfamiliar environment. The study used a mixture of cognitive ethnography and traditional experimental methods. We found that the difference between high and low performing navigators showed up in the speed they completed their task and also in the way they use maps. High performers plan routes using a survey method whereas low performers use a route strategy. We suggest that when people are given a task that does not match their cognitive style they try to transform the task to better suit their cognitive abilities and cognitive style.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cognitive Science Society 2012, 2012
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-93356 (URN)9780976831884 (ISBN)
Conference
34th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2012), 1-4 August 2012, Sapporo, Japan
Available from: 2013-05-30 Created: 2013-05-30 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Östlund, M., Dahlbäck, N. & Petersson, G. I. (2011). 3D Visualization as a Communicative Aid in Pharmaceutical Advice-Giving over Distance. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 13(3)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>3D Visualization as a Communicative Aid in Pharmaceutical Advice-Giving over Distance
2011 (English)In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 13, no 3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Medication misuse results in considerable problems for both patient and society. It is a complex problem with many contributing factors, including timely access to product information. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanObjective: To investigate the value of 3-dimensional (3D) visualization paired with video conferencing as a tool for pharmaceutical advice over distance in terms of accessibility and ease of use for the advice seeker. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: We created a Web-based communication service called AssistancePlus that allows an advisor to demonstrate the physical handling of a complex pharmaceutical product to an advice seeker with the aid of 3D visualization and audio/video conferencing. AssistancePlus was tested in 2 separate user studies performed in a usability lab, under realistic settings and emulating a real usage situation. In the first study, 10 pharmacy students were assisted by 2 advisors from the Swedish National Co-operation of Pharmacies call centre on the use of an asthma inhaler. The student-advisor interview sessions were filmed on video to qualitatively explore their experience of giving and receiving advice with the aid of 3D visualization. In the second study, 3 advisors from the same call centre instructed 23 participants recruited from the general public on the use of 2 products: (1) an insulin injection pen, and (2) a growth hormone injection syringe. First, participants received advice on one product in an audio-recorded telephone call and for the other product in a video-recorded AssistancePlus session (product order balanced). In conjunction with the AssistancePlus session, participants answered a questionnaire regarding accessibility, perceived expressiveness, and general usefulness of 3D visualization for advice-giving over distance compared with the telephone and were given a short interview focusing on their experience of the 3D features. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: In both studies, participants found the AssistancePlus service helpful in providing clear and exact instructions. In the second study, directly comparing AssistancePlus and the telephone, AssistancePlus was judged positively for ease of communication (P = .001), personal contact (P = .001), explanatory power (P andlt;.001), and efficiency (P andlt;.001). Participants in both studies said that they would welcome this type of service as an alternative to the telephone and to face-to-face interaction when a physical meeting is not possible or not convenient. However, although AssistancePlus was considered as easy to use as the telephone, they would choose AssistancePlus over the telephone only when the complexity of the question demanded the higher level of expressiveness it offers. For simpler questions, a simpler service was preferred. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: 3D visualization paired with video conferencing can be useful for advice-giving over distance, specifically for issues that require a higher level of communicative expressiveness than the telephone can offer. 3D-supported advice-giving can increase the range of issues that can be handled over distance and thus improve access to product information.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Journal of Medical Internet Research / Gunther Eysenbach, 2011
Keywords
Pharmaceutical instruction, 3D visualization, distance communication
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-72149 (URN)10.2196/jmir.1437 (DOI)000296260500024 ()21771714 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|eHealth Institute by the National Cooperation of Swedish Pharmacies-Apoteket AB, Linnaeus University (previously University of Kalmar)||Regional Council in Kalmar County||Kalmar County Council||Municipality of Kalmar||

Available from: 2011-11-18 Created: 2011-11-18 Last updated: 2017-12-08
Dahlbäck, N. & Skagerlund, K. (2011). Culture, Cognitive Systems and Extended Mind – Embedding the Extended Mind within Activity Theory. In: : . Paper presented at Workshop on Embodied, Distributed and Extended Cognition, 24-25 March 2011, Barcelona, Spain.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Culture, Cognitive Systems and Extended Mind – Embedding the Extended Mind within Activity Theory
2011 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-93354 (URN)
Conference
Workshop on Embodied, Distributed and Extended Cognition, 24-25 March 2011, Barcelona, Spain
Available from: 2013-05-30 Created: 2013-05-30 Last updated: 2013-06-11
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