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Wibeck, Victoria
Publications (10 of 60) Show all publications
Ballantyne, A. G., Glaas, E., Schmid Neset, T.-S. & Wibeck, V. (2018). Localizing Climate Change: Nordic Homeowners' Interpretations of Visual Representations for Climate Adaptation. Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture (5), 638-652
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Localizing Climate Change: Nordic Homeowners' Interpretations of Visual Representations for Climate Adaptation
2018 (English)In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, no 5, p. 638-652Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In recent years, effort has been put into developing various forms of climate visualization to create opportunities for people to explore and learn about local climate change risks and adaptation options. However, how target audiences make sense of such climate visualization has rarely been studied from a communication perspective. This paper analyses how Nordic homeowners made sense of a specific climate visualization tool, the VisAdapt™ tool. Involving 35 homeowners from three cities in 15 group test sessions, this study analyses the interpretive strategies participants applied to make sense of and assess the relevance of the visualized data. The study demonstrates that participants employed a set of interpretive strategies relating to personal experience and well-known places to make sense of the information presented, and that critical negotiation of content played an important role in how participants interpreted the content.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
Climate visualization, climate adaptation, lay audiences, visual communication, meaning
National Category
Information Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-144236 (URN)10.1080/17524032.2017.1412997 (DOI)000434664100005 ()2-s2.0-85038636143 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agencies: Nordic Centre of Excellence for Strategic Adaptation Research (NORD-STAR); Nordic Top-level Research Initiative sub-program "Effect studies and adaptation to climate change"

Available from: 2018-01-12 Created: 2018-01-12 Last updated: 2018-06-28Bibliographically approved
Gammelgaard Ballantyne, A., Wibeck, V. & Neset, T.-S. (2016). Images of climate change: A pilot study of young people’s perceptions of ICT-based climate visualization. Climatic Change, 134(1), 73-85
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Images of climate change: A pilot study of young people’s perceptions of ICT-based climate visualization
2016 (English)In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 134, no 1, p. 73-85Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change can be difficult for laypeople to make sense of, because of its complexity, the uncertainties involved and its distant impacts. Research has identified the potentials of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) for visualizing and communicating climate change to lay audiences and thus addressing these communication challenges.However, little research has focused on how ICT-based visualization affects audiences’ understandings of climate change. Employing a semiotic framework and through a combination of focus group interviews and mindmap exercises, we investigated how Swedish students make sense of climate messages presented through an ICT-based visualisation medium; a dome theatre movie. The paper concludes that visualization in immersive environments works well to concretize aspects of climate change and provide a starting point for reflection, but we argue that the potential to add interactive elements should be further explored, as interaction has the potential to influence meaning-making processes. In addition, audiences’ preconceptions of climate change influence their interpretations of climate messages, which may function as a constraint to climate communication.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Keywords
Climate change communication, meaning, semiotics, ICT-based visualization, lay audience, dome theatre
National Category
Communication Studies Human Aspects of ICT Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122796 (URN)10.1007/s10584-015-1533-9 (DOI)000367198900006 ()
Projects
Nordic Top-level Research Initiative through the Nordic Centre of Excellence for Strategic Adaptation Research (NORD-STAR)Vetenskapsrådet / Swedish Research Council project no. 2008-1723
Funder
Nordic Council of MinistersSwedish Research Council, 2008-1723
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council [2008-1723]; Nordic Top-level Research Initiative through the Nordic Centre of Excellence for Strategic Adaptation Research (NORD-STAR)

Available from: 2015-11-23 Created: 2015-11-23 Last updated: 2018-05-08
Wibeck, V., Hansson, A., Himmelsbach, R., Fridahl, M., Linnér, B.-O. & Anshelm, J. (2016). Policy brief on climate engineering. Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Policy brief on climate engineering
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2016 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Climate engineering (geoengineering) has been widely discussed as a potential instrument for curbing global warming if politics fails to deliver green house gas emission reductions. This debate has lost momentum over the last couple of years, but is now being renewed in the wake of the December 2015 Paris climate change agreement. Resurgent interest primarily stems from two elements of the Paris agreement. First, by defining the long term goal as “achiev[ing] a balance between anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks of greenhouse gases” instead of decarbonization, the agreement can be interpreted as providing leeway for climate engineering proposals. Second, the agreement formulated a temperature goal of “well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels and pursuing efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C”. In response, several scientists argued that these goals may require climate engineering.

As these discussions will affect the forthcoming review of pathways toward 1.5°C warming, this policy brief takes stock of climate engineering. It draws on the expertise of Linköping University’s Climate Engineering (LUCE) interdisciplinary research programme. The brief provides an overview of the status of academic debate on climate engineering regarding bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS);  stratospheric aerosol injection; and mass media reporting and public engagement.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2016. p. 4
Series
CSPR Briefing ; 2016:15
National Category
Climate Research Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126348 (URN)
Available from: 2016-03-22 Created: 2016-03-22 Last updated: 2017-03-06Bibliographically approved
Hansson, A., Rayner, S. & Wibeck, V. (2015). Climate engineering (1ed.). In: Karin Bäckstrand, Eva Lövbrand (Ed.), Research handbook on climate governance: (pp. 411-422). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate engineering
2015 (English)In: Research handbook on climate governance / [ed] Karin Bäckstrand, Eva Lövbrand, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015, 1, p. 411-422Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2015 Edition: 1
Keywords
climate engineering, geoengineering, governance, climate change, framing, Klimatförändringar, Miljöteknik
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127153 (URN)9781783470594 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2012-1101Swedish Research Council Formas, 2012-725Swedish Research Council Formas, 2012-1838
Available from: 2016-04-15 Created: 2016-04-15 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Linnér, B.-O. & Wibeck, V. (2015). Dual high-stake emerging technologies: A review of the climate engineering research literature. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, 6(2), 255-268
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dual high-stake emerging technologies: A review of the climate engineering research literature
2015 (English)In: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, ISSN 1757-7780, E-ISSN 1757-7799, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 255-268Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The literature on climate engineering, or geoengineering, covers a wide range of potential methods for solar radiation management or carbon dioxide removal that vary in technical aspects, temporal and spatial scales, potential environmental impacts, and legal, ethical, and governance challenges. This paper presents a comprehensive review of social and natural science papers on this topic since 2006 and listed in SCOPUS andWeb of Science. It adds to previous literature reviews by combining analyses of bibliometric patterns and of trends in how the technologies are framed in terms of content, motivations, stakes, and recommendations. Most peer-reviewed climate engineering literature does not weigh the risks and new, additional, benefits of the various technologies, but emphasizes either the potential dangers of climate engineering or the climate change consequences of refraining from considering the research, development, demonstration, and/or deployment of climate engineering technologies. To analyse this polarity, not prevalent in the literature on earlier emerging technologies, we explore the concept of dual high-stake technologies. As appeals to fear have proven ineffective in spurring public engagement in climate change, we may not expect significant public support for climate engineering technologies whose rationale is not to achieve benefits in addition to avoiding the high stakes of climate change. Furthermore, in designing public engagement exercises, researchers must be careful not to steer discussions by emphasizing one type of stake framing over another. A dual high-stake, rather than risk–benefit, framing should also be considered in analysing some emerging technologies with similar characteristics, for example, nanotechnology for pollution control.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2015
Keywords
climate engineering, geoengineering, solar radiation management (SRM), carbon dioxide removal (CDR), climate change
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113555 (URN)10.1002/wcc.333 (DOI)000352721000008 ()
Projects
Social representations of novel dual high-stake technologies: the case of geoengineering (VR 2012-1101)Making sense of geoengineering (Formas 2012-725)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2012-1101Swedish Research Council Formas, 2012-725
Available from: 2015-01-22 Created: 2015-01-22 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Wibeck, V., Hansson, A. & Anshelm, J. (2015). Questioning the technological fix to climate change: Lay sense-making of geoengineering in Sweden. Energy Research & Social Science, 7(May), 23-30
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Questioning the technological fix to climate change: Lay sense-making of geoengineering in Sweden
2015 (English)In: Energy Research & Social Science, ISSN 2214-6296, Vol. 7, no May, p. 23-30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper explores how Swedish laypeople make sense of emerging ideas of the large-scale deliberate technical manipulation of the global climate, known as geoengineering (GE). The paper is based on semi-structured focus group interviews with open-ended questions, allowing participants to express their spontaneous thoughts about GE. Although the focus group participants expressed great concern about climate change, GE was largely met with a sceptical, negative response. Participants perceived GE to: have negative environmental side-effects, address the symptoms rather than causes of climate change, create moral hazard and give rise to various governance challenges. Participants did not just reject the idea of GE outright; rather, social representations started to form in the focus groups through testing and negotiating arguments both pro and contra GE research and deployment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Geoengineering; Climate change; Focus groups; Social representations; Public engagement
National Category
Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-119732 (URN)10.1016/j.erss.2015.03.001 (DOI)000218700000003 ()
Projects
LUCE
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasSwedish Research Council
Available from: 2015-06-25 Created: 2015-06-25 Last updated: 2018-03-09Bibliographically approved
Buhr, K. & Wibeck, V. (2014). Communication approaches for carbon capture and storage: Underlying assumptions of limited versus extensive public engagement. Energy Research and Social Science, 3, 5-12
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Communication approaches for carbon capture and storage: Underlying assumptions of limited versus extensive public engagement
2014 (English)In: Energy Research and Social Science, ISSN 2214-6296, Vol. 3, p. 5-12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A pertinent issue in the literature on communication on emerging technologies such as carbon capture and storage (CCS) concerns the degree to which the public is actively involved in the communication process. While researchers have highlighted the pros and cons of limited versus extensive public engagement, the assumptions underlying various communication approaches have been largely neglected. Illuminating assumptions are important for scholarly understandings of what influences communication and for practitioner reflexive awareness in designing communication plans. This paper explores assumptions made about senders and receivers when involving the public to various degrees in CCS communication and how these assumptions relate to different communication objectives. We describe two contrasting communication approaches, the transmission and participatory approaches, relating them to CCS characteristics and research. We find that CCS communication may, deliberately or not, be based on different assumptions about the social framing of CCS concerning who should formulate the message, the public’s ability to understand complex science, the public’s interest in helping frame CCS, and whether public opinions should be taken into account. These assumptions also relate to different communication objectives – convincing the public or increasing dialogue – implying different communication fora, predictability, and input.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keywords
Carbon capture and storage; communication; public engagement
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-107902 (URN)10.1016/j.erss.2014.05.004 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-06-23 Created: 2014-06-23 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Wibeck, V. (2014). Enhancing learning, communication and public engagement about climate change – some lessons from recent literature. Environmental Education Research, 20(3), 387-411
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enhancing learning, communication and public engagement about climate change – some lessons from recent literature
2014 (English)In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 387-411Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper sets out to develop key messages for the theory and practice of environmental education from a review of recent research literature on climate change communication (CCC) and education. It focuses on how learners of climate science understand messages on climate change, the communicative contexts for education on climate change, the barriers that can be found to public engagement with climate change issues, and how these barriers can be addressed. 92 peer-reviewed studies were examined. The analysis focuses on the goals and strategies of CCC, and how barriers can be addressed given the research findings on: (a) the content of CCC, (b) visualizations, (c) framing, (d) audience segmentation. The paper concludes that CCC and education need to address barriers to public engagement on several levels simultaneously. It recommends that scholars of environmental education focus critical attention on how practice addresses senses and spheres of agency; sociocultural factors; and the complexities of developing scientific literacy given the interpretative frames and prior understandings that are brought to bear by the public in non-formal education settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2014
Keywords
climate change; communication; public understanding; public engagement; learning; non-formal education
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-96012 (URN)10.1080/13504622.2013.812720 (DOI)000333951100006 ()
Projects
Making sense of climate change. A study of the formation and maintenance of social representations
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2008-1723
Available from: 2013-08-13 Created: 2013-08-13 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Wibeck, V. (2014). Fokusgrupper (1ed.). In: Maria Henricson (Ed.), Videnskabelig teori og metode: Fra idé til eksamination (pp. 189-212). Copenhagen: Munksgaard Forlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fokusgrupper
2014 (Danish)In: Videnskabelig teori og metode: Fra idé til eksamination / [ed] Maria Henricson, Copenhagen: Munksgaard Forlag, 2014, 1, p. 189-212Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Copenhagen: Munksgaard Forlag, 2014 Edition: 1
Keywords
fokusgrupper, metod
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-106068 (URN)9788762812413 (ISBN)
Note

Översättning

Available from: 2014-04-23 Created: 2014-04-23 Last updated: 2015-06-10
Wibeck, V. (2014). Social representations of climate change in Swedish lay focus groups: Local or distant, gradual or catastrophic?. Public Understanding of Science, 23(2), 204-219
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social representations of climate change in Swedish lay focus groups: Local or distant, gradual or catastrophic?
2014 (English)In: Public Understanding of Science, ISSN 0963-6625, E-ISSN 1361-6609, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 204-219Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper explores social representations of climate change, investigating how climate change is discussed by Swedish laypeople interacting in focus group interviews. The analysis focuses on prototypical examples and metaphors, which were key devices for objectifying climate change representations. The paper analyzes how the interaction of focus group participants with other speakers, ideas, arguments, and broader social representations shaped their representations of climate change. Climate change was understood as a global but distant issue with severe consequences. There was a dynamic tension between representations of climate change as a gradual vs. unpredictable process. Implications for climate change communication are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2014
Keywords
climate change, focus groups, interaction, metaphor, objectification, social representations
National Category
Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-85135 (URN)10.1177/0963662512462787 (DOI)000330504500006 ()
Projects
Making sense of climate change: a study of the formation and maintenance of social representations
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2008-1723
Available from: 2012-11-06 Created: 2012-11-06 Last updated: 2017-12-07
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