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Jansson, Nicklas
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Publications (10 of 31) Show all publications
Milberg, P., Bergman, K.-O., Sancak, K. & Jansson, N. (2016). Assemblages of saproxylic beetles on large downed trunks of oak. Ecology and Evolution, 6(6), 1614-1625
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assemblages of saproxylic beetles on large downed trunks of oak
2016 (English)In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 1614-1625Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Old living oaks (Quercus robur) are known as a very species-rich habitat for saproxylic beetles, but it is less clear to what extent such veteran trees differ from an even rarer feature: downed trunks of large oaks. In this study, we set out to sample this habitat, using window traps, with two aims: (1) to describe the variation of assemblages among downed trunks of different type and (2) to compare beetles on downed oaks with data from veteran standing trees. The results showed that trunk volume and sun exposure better explained assemblages as well as species numbers on downed trunks than did decay stage. Furthermore, species classified as facultative saproxylic species showed weak or no differentiation among downed trunks. Species with different feeding habits showed no apparent differentiation among downed trunks. Furthermore, species composition on dead, downed oak trunks differed sharply from that of living, veteran oaks. Wood or bark feeders were more common on veterans than downed trunks, but there was no difference for those species feeding on fungi or those feeding on insects and their remains. In conclusion, for a successful conservation of the saproxylic beetle fauna it is important to keep downed oak trunks, and particularly large ones, in forest and pastures as they constitute a saproxylic habitat that differs from that of living trees.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2016
Keywords
Coleoptera, log, Quercus robur, snag, Sweden, veteran tree
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126288 (URN)10.1002/ece3.1935 (DOI)000372488300004 ()26904184 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Eklandskapsfonden (Linkoping municipality) Ostergotland County Administration Board

Available from: 2016-03-21 Created: 2016-03-21 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Carlsson, S., Bergman, K.-O., Jansson, N., Ranius, T. & Milberg, P. (2016). Boxing for biodiversity: evaluation of an artificiallycreated decaying wood habitat. Biodiversity and Conservation, 25(2), 393-405
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Boxing for biodiversity: evaluation of an artificiallycreated decaying wood habitat
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2016 (English)In: Biodiversity and Conservation, ISSN 0960-3115, E-ISSN 1572-9710, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 393-405Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many saproxylic species are threatened in Europe because of habitat decline.Hollow trees represent an important habitat for saproxylic species. Artificial habitats mayneed to be created to maintain or increase the amount of habitat due to natural habitat decline.This study investigated the extent to which saproxylic beetles use artificial habitats in woodenboxes. The boxes were placed at various distances (0–1800 m) from known biodiversityhotspots with hollow oaks and studied over 10 years. Boxes were mainly filled with oak sawdust, oak leaves, hay and lucerne flour. In total, 2170 specimens of 91 saproxylic beetlespecies were sampled in 43 boxes. The abundance of species associated with tree hollows,wood rot and animal nests increased from the fourth to the final year, but species richnessdeclined for all groups. This study shows that wooden boxes can function as saproxylicspecies habitats. The artificial habitats developed into a more hollow-like environment duringthe decade long experiment with fewer but more abundant tree hollow specialists.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2016
Keywords
Artificial habitats Hollow trees Intervention Saproxylic beetles Succession Wood mould
National Category
Environmental Sciences related to Agriculture and Land-use Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125192 (URN)10.1007/s10531-016-1057-2 (DOI)000370137100012 ()
Note

Funding agencies:  Stiftelsen Oscar och Lili Lamms minne; Eklandskapsfonden i Linkopings kommun

Available from: 2016-02-15 Created: 2016-02-15 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Milberg, P., Bergman, K.-O., Norman, H., Pettersson, R. B., Westerberg, L., Wikars, L.-O. & Jansson, N. (2015). A burning desire for smoke? Sampling insects favoured by forestfire in the absence of fire. Journal of Insect Conservation, 19(1), 55-65
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A burning desire for smoke? Sampling insects favoured by forestfire in the absence of fire
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 55-65Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fire-favoured insects are difficult to sampleexcept opportunistically after forest fires. Here, we tested ifsmoke from a small fire could be an efficient way to samplesuch insects. Insects were sampled over ca. 10 h hours, byhand-picking and netting on screens put up around the fire.Two specimens of the rare and redlisted Hormopeza spp.(Diptera, Empididae) were caught. Large numbers([20,000) of Microsania spp. (Diptera, Platypezidae) werecaught, but none in the absence of smoke. The numbers ofMicrosania spp. clearly peaked in late afternoon, and ashort sampling period would be sufficient if targeting onlythis taxon. Of the almost 200 species of Coleoptera, 17 %were considered as fire-favoured, contributing 9 % of thespecimens, suggesting low efficiency of the method for thisgroup. Using 23 sites differing in fire history, catches ofMicrosania spp. were unaffected by numbers and area offorest fire (preceding 5 years and within 10 km radius overthe sampling sites). In contrast, there was a weak trend forthe proportion of fire-favoured Coleoptera to increase withincreasing number of fires. To conclude, smoke as producedin our study can clearly attract fire-favoured Diptera,but smoke had only a weak effect on fire-favoured Coleopterain the study area. It is still likely that selectivelypicking specimens of species attracted to smoke is a morecost-efficient method than using, e.g., Malaise traps thatcatch indiscriminately.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2015
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115293 (URN)10.1007/s10841-014-9742-5 (DOI)000350887700006 ()
Available from: 2015-03-12 Created: 2015-03-12 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Bergner, A., Avci, M., Eryigit, H., Jansson, N., Niklasson, M., Westerberg, L. & Milberg, P. (2015). Influences of forest type and habitat structure on bird assemblagesof oak (Quercus spp.) and pine (Pinus spp.) stands in southwesternTurkey. Forest Ecology and Management, 336, 137-147
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influences of forest type and habitat structure on bird assemblagesof oak (Quercus spp.) and pine (Pinus spp.) stands in southwesternTurkey
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2015 (English)In: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, E-ISSN 1872-7042, Vol. 336, p. 137-147Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Mediterranean basin exhibits a multitude of forest habitats affected by former and current exploitation and management. Recent afforestation programs have resulted in an increase in the proportion of coniferous trees, while oak stands, formerly utilized for coppicing and grazing, are abandoned or converted into coniferous plantations. The loss of oak stands might negatively affect birds dependent upon broadleaved forests. Studies confirming or rejecting that statement are scarce, particularly in the eastern part of the region. Using a study area in southwestern Turkey we applied a guild-based approach to investigate how pine and oak stands across a chronosequence differ in their capacity to support forest bird assemblages. Variables describing the vegetation were sampled to characterize the stands and relate bird assemblages to stand structure. Bird abundance and species richness was positively associated with age for both stand types. Richness and diversity was highest in oak stands, while there were no differences in bird abundance between the two forest types. Pine stands supported a different bird species composition compared to oak stands of the same age. Stand age and structure, rather than forest type, held the highest explanatory powers for bird assembly structure. Primary cavity-nesters and ground-nesters were more abundant in oak stands, possibly reflecting differences in stand structure and resource distribution. To support these birds with suitable habitats, oaks stands need conservation. Management practices in pine stands should strive for increasing the amount of old trees and retain vegetation in the understory to benefit breeding birds.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Birds, Forestry, Guilds, Management, Oak, Pine
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111925 (URN)10.1016/j.foreco.2014.10.025 (DOI)000347740000015 ()
Available from: 2014-11-10 Created: 2014-11-10 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Serap Avgin, S., Antonini, G., Lason, A., Jansson, N., Oncul Abacigil, T., Vural Varli, S., . . . Audisio, P. (2015). New data on distribution, ecology, and taxonomy of Turkish Nitidulidae (Coleoptera). Turkish Journal of Zoology, 39(2), 314-322
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New data on distribution, ecology, and taxonomy of Turkish Nitidulidae (Coleoptera)
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2015 (English)In: Turkish Journal of Zoology, ISSN 1300-0179, E-ISSN 1303-6114, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 314-322Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper updates our present knowledge on the geographical distribution and host plant relationships of Turkish species of the sap- and pollen-beetle family Nitidulidae. Pria zenobia Jelinek, 1997 from eastern Mediterranean areas is synonymized with Pria angustula Cooper, 1982, from South Africa (syn. nov.). The unknown ovipositor of Xerogethes osellai Audisio and Jelinek, 2000, a species endemic to central Turkey, is described, and the first information on its biology is reported. Glischrochilus quadripunctatus (Linnaeus, 1758) (Tunceli Province) and Pityophagus quercus Reitter, 1877 (Balikesir Province) are first recorded for the Turkish fauna. The distributions of Glischrochilus hortensis (Geoffroy in Fourcroy, 1785), Soronia grisea (Linnaeus, 1758), Brassicogethes cristofaroi (Audisio and De Biase, 2005), Stachygethes zarudnyi (Kirejtshuk, 1984), S. assimilis (Sturm, 1845), Sagittogethes biondii (Audisio, 1988), and S. hoffmanni (Reitter, 1871) are updated. The previously unknown larval host plants of other Turkish and Balkan Meligethinae are identified, and Clypeogethes chlorocyaneus (Jelinek and Audisio, 1977) is first reported from Greece. Finally, a new updated checklist of the Turkish Nitidulidae is presented.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Scientific and Technical Research Council of Turkey, 2015
Keywords
Coleoptera; Nitidulidae; Turkey; geographical distribution; host plants; new synonymy; checklist
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117674 (URN)10.3906/zoo-1402-27 (DOI)000352489600015 ()
Available from: 2015-05-11 Created: 2015-05-06 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Goug, L. A., Sverdrup-Thygeson, A., Milberg, P., Pilskog, H. E., Jansson, N., Jonsell, M. & Birkemoe, T. (2015). Specialists in ancient trees are more affected by climate than generalists. Ecology and Evolution, 5(23), 5632-5641
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Specialists in ancient trees are more affected by climate than generalists
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2015 (English)In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 5, no 23, p. 5632-5641Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ancient trees are considered one of the most important habitats for biodiversityin Europe and North America. They support exceptional numbers of specializedspecies, including a range of rare and endangered wood-living insects. In thisstudy, we use a dataset of 105 sites spanning a climatic gradient along the oakrange of Norway and Sweden to investigate the importance of temperature andprecipitation on beetle species richness in ancient, hollow oak trees. We expectedthat increased summer temperature would positively influence all wood-livingbeetle species whereas precipitation would be less important with a negligible ornegative impact. Surprisingly, only oak-specialist beetles with a northern distributionincreased in species richness with temperature. Few specialist beetles and nogeneralist beetles responded to the rise of 4°C in summer as covered by our climaticgradient. The negative effect of precipitation affected more specialist speciesthan did temperature, whereas the generalists remained unaffected. In summary,we suggest that increased summer temperature is likely to benefit a few specialistbeetles within this dead wood community, but a larger number of specialists arelikely to decline due to increased precipitation. In addition, generalist species willremain unaffected. To minimize adverse impacts of climate change on this importantcommunity, long-term management plans for ancient trees are important.

Keywords
Beetles, climate gradient, coleoptera, precipitation, saproxylic, temperature
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123377 (URN)10.1002/ece3.1799 (DOI)000367433000017 ()
Note

Funding agencies: Norwegian Environment Agency

Available from: 2015-12-14 Created: 2015-12-14 Last updated: 2017-12-01
Andersson, K., Bergman, K.-O., Andersson, F., Hedenström, E., Jansson, N., Burman, J., . . . Milberg, P. (2014). High-accuracy sampling of saproxylic diversity indicators at regionalscales with pheromones: The case of Elater ferrugineus (Coleoptera, Elateridae). Biological Conservation, 171, 156-166
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High-accuracy sampling of saproxylic diversity indicators at regionalscales with pheromones: The case of Elater ferrugineus (Coleoptera, Elateridae)
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2014 (English)In: Biological Conservation, ISSN 0006-3207, E-ISSN 1873-2917, Vol. 171, p. 156-166Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The rare beetle Elater ferrugineus was sampled at 47 sites in the county of Östergötland, Sweden by meansof pheromone-baited traps to assess its value as an indicator species for hollow oak stands rich in raresaproxylic beetle species. In addition, Osmoderma eremita was also sampled with pheromone baits. Thesedata were then compared against species survey data collected at the same sites by pitfall and windowtraps. Both species co-occur with many Red Listed saproxylic beetles, with E. ferrugineus being a somewhatbetter indicator for the rarest species. The conservation value of a site (measured as Red List pointsor number of Red Listed species) increased with the number of specimens of E. ferrugineus and O. eremitacaught. Accuracy of sampling by means of pheromone trapping turned out to be radically different for thetwo model species. E. ferrugineus traps put out during July obtained full accuracy after only 6 days,whereas O. eremita traps needed to be out from early July to mid-August in order to obtain full accuracywith one trap per site. By using E. ferrugineus, or preferably both species, as indicator species, accuracywould increase and costs decrease for saproxylic biodiversity sampling, monitoring and identificationof hotspots.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keywords
Beetles Conservation Indicators Monitoring Pheromone Saproxylic
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-104593 (URN)10.1016/j.biocon.2014.01.007 (DOI)000335486400018 ()
Available from: 2014-02-19 Created: 2014-02-19 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Milberg, P., Bergman, K.-O., Johansson, H. & Jansson, N. (2014). Low host-tree preferences among saproxylic beetles: acomparison of four deciduous species. Insect Conservation and Diversity, 7(6), 508-522
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Low host-tree preferences among saproxylic beetles: acomparison of four deciduous species
2014 (English)In: Insect Conservation and Diversity, ISSN 1752-458X, E-ISSN 1752-4598, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 508-522Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]
  • Many wood-dwelling beetles rely on old hollow trees. In Europe, oaks are known to harbour a species-rich saproxylic beetle fauna, while less is known regarding other broad-leaved tree species. Furthermore, the extent to which saproxylic insect species have specialised on different tree species remains unknown.
  • In this study, we sampled beetles through pitfall traps and window traps in four different tree species in a landscape with many old oaks.
  • We recorded 242 saproxylic beetle species of which 27 were red-listed. After eliminating the species recorded only on a single tree, few cases among the 171 remaining species in the data set were confined to a single tree species.
  • Using odds ratios, we showed that 19 of the 171 beetle species showed significant associations with Quercus robur in at least one of the two trap types. For Acer platanoides, Fraxinus excelsior and Tilia cordata, the corresponding numbers were 6, 2 and 5, respectively. One species showed a negative association with Q. robur.
  • Using meta-analysis, we quantified the degree of association between the beetle species and the tree species. The associations were most profound among species classified as obligate saproxylic rather than facultative in lifestyle. Overall, a significant association was only found with Q. robur.
  • We conclude that the saproxylic fauna is dominated by non-specialist species but includes a small proportion of truly host-tree-specific species. Furthermore, other broad-leaved trees can be important as supporting habitats for many saproxylic organisms that have had presumed associations with oaks to date.
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2014
Keywords
Beetle, broad-leaved tree, coleoptera, conservation, hollow, preference, saproxylic.
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111927 (URN)10.1111/icad.12074 (DOI)000344017100003 ()
Available from: 2014-11-10 Created: 2014-11-10 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Hilszczanski, J., Jaworski, T., Plewa, R. & Jansson, N. (2014). Surrogate tree cavities: boxes with artificial substrate can serve as temporary habitat for Osmoderma barnabita (Motsch.) (Coleoptera, Cetoniinae). Journal of Insect Conservation, 18(5), 855-861
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Surrogate tree cavities: boxes with artificial substrate can serve as temporary habitat for Osmoderma barnabita (Motsch.) (Coleoptera, Cetoniinae)
2014 (English)In: Journal of Insect Conservation, ISSN 1366-638X, E-ISSN 1572-9753, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 855-861Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many saproxylic insects have declined or became extinct, mainly due to habitat loss and fragmentation, and their survival increasingly depends on active conservation. Efforts to achieve this goal may be supported by the introduction of new methods, including creation of artificial habitats. Here we present results of studies on the use of wooden boxes mimicking tree cavities for an endangered saproxylic species, Osmoderma barnabita. Boxes were filled with the feeding substrate for larvae and installed on trees. Second and third-instar O. barnabita larvae were introduced in half of the boxes; the remaining ones were left uninhabited. Later inspection of boxes showed a high survival rate of introduced larvae, as well as successful breeding of a new generation inside the boxes. At the same time boxes were not colonized by the local population of O. barnabita, although other cetoniids did so. The co-occurring larvae of other cetoniids did not affect O. barnabita larvae. Thermal conditions inside boxes and natural tree cavities were almost identical and based on the results of our studies we conclude that wooden boxes may serve as temporary habitat for O. barnabita. They may be particularly useful in cases of destruction of species natural habitat, in restoration programs, and have the potential to act as a stepping stones in cases of a lack of habitat continuity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2014
Keywords
Artificial habitat; Hollow trees; Saproxylic insects; Conservation method; Protaetia; Cetonia
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112314 (URN)10.1007/s10841-014-9692-y (DOI)000343726300010 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|General Directorate of State Forests in Poland

Available from: 2014-11-24 Created: 2014-11-24 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Novak, V., Avci, M., Jansson, N., Sarikaya, O., Atay, E., Kayis, T., . . . Aytar, F. (2013). A New Mycetochara Species (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae: Alleculinae) from Turkey. Journal of the Entomological Research Society, 15(2), 51-58
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A New Mycetochara Species (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae: Alleculinae) from Turkey
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2013 (English)In: Journal of the Entomological Research Society, ISSN 1302-0250, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 51-58Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In a study of old hollow oaks in southern Turkey, a new species from genus Mycetochara (subgenus Ernocharis) was found. The species Mycetochara mersinica Novák sp. nov., are presently described, illustrated and compared with other species from the region.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Gazi Entomological Research Society (GERS), 2013
Keywords
Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae, Alleculinae, Mycetochara, Ernocharis
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-95989 (URN)000323991600006 ()
Available from: 2013-08-12 Created: 2013-08-12 Last updated: 2013-09-30Bibliographically approved
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