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Persson, Ingrid
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 19) Show all publications
Persson, I. & Persson, K. (2013). About using ficion and film in gender education. Journal of Contemporary Medical Education, 1(2), 100-105
Open this publication in new window or tab >>About using ficion and film in gender education
2013 (English)In: Journal of Contemporary Medical Education, ISSN 2146-8354, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 100-105Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Gender, male and female has always been of great interest and present in almost all fiction and films, within different perspectives. Ever since the dawn of time, man has taught ethics, morals, values and existential questions using fictional stories in oral and later in written form. The aim of analyzing the concept of male and female from fiction and film is to reach deeper insight and understanding of human beings with special reference to gender in both individual, group and community perspective. The general aim is to create security in our gender and professional roles. Whole or parts of books and films are used, chosen according to the specific learning outcome. Different aspects are then discussed in lectures, seminars or groups. Aspects include projections, culture and behavior. Students learn to reach a deeper insight and understanding of gender regarding behavior, communication, attitudes, values, culture and ethnicity. Peeling off the illusion of male and female created by our social structure, and making our values and prejudices conscious, we might discern the eternally human, the inner core of being human, regardless of sex. Fiction and film make conscious behavior, communication and gender, and merge cognition and emotions. This way of teaching may lead to better treatment of patients by health care personnel

Keywords
Fiction, film, gender, higher education
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-95613 (URN)10.5455/jcme.20130220110635 (DOI)
Available from: 2013-07-12 Created: 2013-07-12 Last updated: 2014-11-12Bibliographically approved
Persson, I. (2013). Red wine, white wine, rosé wine, and grape juice inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme in human endothelial cells. International Journal of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases, 3(1), 17-23
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Red wine, white wine, rosé wine, and grape juice inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme in human endothelial cells
2013 (English)In: International Journal of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases, ISSN 2231-0738, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 17-23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Beneficial effects of wine on cardiovascular disease have been shown previously, but the mechanism is still unknown. The renin-angiotensin system is an important mechanism in the body concerning regulation of blood pressure, fluid, and electrolyte balance, and the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a key enzyme in this system. Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of red wine, white wine, rosι wine, and alcohol-free grape juice on somatic ACE-1 activity. The effects of the stilbene resveratrol and its glycoside, resveratrol-3-glycoside were also tested on ACE activity and concentration of nitric oxide (NO). Materials and Methods: Cultured endothelial cells from human umbilical veins (HUVEC) were incubated with wine, grape juice, resveratrol, or resveratrol-3-glycoside. Ethanol was used as control in the corresponding concentration (13%). Results: After incubation, a significant inhibition of ACE activity was seen with all the wines tested and the red grape juice. This inhibition was of a similar magnitude except for a lesser inhibition with the rosι wine. No significant inhibition was seen with the white grape juice, resveratrol, resveratrol-3-glycoside, or ethanol alone, and neither did resveratrol nor resveratrol-3-glycoside affect the concentration of NO. Conclusions: The effect of wine and grape juice on ACE activity in HUVEC is dependent on the amount of flavonoids and not on the content of alcohol or resveratrol.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Medknow Publications, 2013
Keywords
ACE, cardiovascular disease, ethanol, grape juice, resveratrol, wine
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-89143 (URN)10.4103/2231-0738.106975 (DOI)
Available from: 2013-02-22 Created: 2013-02-22 Last updated: 2017-02-09Bibliographically approved
Zuzak, T. J., Bonkova, J., Careddu, D., Garami, M., Hadjipanayis, A., Jazbec, J., . . . Laengler, A. (2013). Use of complementary and alternative medicine by children in Europe: Published data and expert perspectives. Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 21, S34-S47
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Use of complementary and alternative medicine by children in Europe: Published data and expert perspectives
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2013 (English)In: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, ISSN 0965-2299, E-ISSN 1873-6963, Vol. 21, p. S34-S47Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Few data document the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in Europe, with even fewer investigating use by children. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: A narrative, non-systematic review of CAM use in Europe was performed by combining data from published surveys with expert perspectives. Limitations created by a lack of representative studies, varying definitions of CAM use, and what qualifies as CAM in different countries was partially overcome by integrating local experts to summarise information available only in the national language and provide their perspectives about CAM availability, quality, use and popularity in their countries using a semi-structured questionnaire. Local and international published surveys were summarised, and the prevalence of CAM use was extrapolated. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Data from 20 European countries were available, representing 69% of the European population. Some data about CAM use by the general population were available for 90% of the examined countries, whereas peer-reviewed published surveys were available for only 60%. We extrapolated that 56% (range: 10-90%, adjusted for population size) of the European population in general had used CAM at least once in the past year. Surveys in CAM use by children were available for 55% of the investigated countries. The extrapolated prevalence of CAM use by children in Europe was 52% (range: 5-90%, adjusted for population size). Paediatric CAM experts reported an increasing awareness for and use of CAM in healthcare institutions. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: This precursor for further surveys indicates that CAM appears to be popular not only among adults in Europe, but also for children. Development of a pan-European definition of CAM use and CAM therapies are required to achieve surveys comparable between European countries. Additionally, more research investigating the efficacy and potential adverse effects of CAM therapies is needed because of increasing CAM use by children in Europe.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
CAM, Prevalence, Europe, Child, Homeopathy, Herbal, Acupuncture, Anthroposophic
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-93398 (URN)10.1016/j.ctim.2012.01.001 (DOI)000318190100006 ()
Available from: 2013-05-31 Created: 2013-05-31 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Persson, I.-L. A. (2012). The Pharmacological Mechanism of Angiotensin-converting Enzyme Inhibition by Green Tea, Rooibos and Enalaprilat - A Study on Enzyme Kinetics. Phytotherapy Research, 26(4), 517-521
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Pharmacological Mechanism of Angiotensin-converting Enzyme Inhibition by Green Tea, Rooibos and Enalaprilat - A Study on Enzyme Kinetics
2012 (English)In: Phytotherapy Research, ISSN 0951-418X, E-ISSN 1099-1573, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 517-521Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Green tea (Camellia sinensis L.) and Rooibos (Aspalathus linearis Dahlg.) inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in vitro and in vivo. The ACE inhibitor enalaprilat has been described previously as a competitive inhibitor and sometimes as a non-competitive inhibitor. The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacological mechanism of ACE inhibition of green tea and Rooibos by enzyme kinetics, and to compare this with enalaprilat. A MichaelisMenten kinetics and LineweaverBurk graph showed mean values of Vmax?=?3.73 mu m and Km?=?0.71 mu m for green tea, of Vmax?=?6.76 mu m and Km?=?0.78 mu m for Rooibos, of Vmax?=?12.54 mu m and Km?=?2.77 mu m for enalaprilat, and of Vmax?=?51.33 mu m and Km?=?9.22 mu m for the PBS control. Incubating serum with green tea or Rooibos saturated with zinc chloride did not change the inhibitory effect. Enalaprilat preincubated with zinc chloride showed a decrease in the inhibitory effect. In conclusion, green tea, Rooibos and enalaprilat seem to inhibit ACE activity using a mixed inhibitor mechanism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley and Sons, 2012
Keywords
Michaelis-Menten, Lineweaver-Burk, flavonoids, tea
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-77101 (URN)10.1002/ptr.3588 (DOI)000302620000007 ()
Note
Funding Agencies|Signhild Engkvists Stiftelse||Petrus och Augusta Hedlunds Stiftelse||Available from: 2012-05-04 Created: 2012-05-04 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Persson, I. A., Persson, K., Hägg, S. & Andersson, R. G. (2011). Effects of cocoa extract and dark chocolate on angiotensin-converting enzyme and nitric oxide in human endothelial cells and healthy volunteers--a nutrigenomics perspective.. Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology, 57(1), 44-50
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of cocoa extract and dark chocolate on angiotensin-converting enzyme and nitric oxide in human endothelial cells and healthy volunteers--a nutrigenomics perspective.
2011 (English)In: Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology, ISSN 0160-2446, E-ISSN 1533-4023, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 44-50Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Evidence suggests that cocoa from the bean of Theobroma cacao L. has beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate if cocoa extract and dark chocolate influence angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and nitric oxide (NO) in human endothelial cells (in vitro) and in healthy volunteers (in vivo). ACE activity was analyzed with a commercial radioenzymatic assay and measured in human endothelial cells from umbilical veins (HUVEC) after 10 minutes of incubation with cocoa extract. NO was measured after 24 hours of incubation. ACE activity and NO were measured at baseline and after 30, 60, and 180 minutes in 16 healthy volunteers after a single intake of 75 g of dark chocolate containing 72% cocoa. Significant inhibition of ACE activity (P < 0.01) and significant increase of NO (P < 0.001) were seen in HUVEC. In the study subjects, a significant inhibition of ACE activity (mean 18%) 3 hours after intake of dark chocolate was seen, but no significant change in NO was seen. According to ACE genotype, significant inhibition of ACE activity was seen after 3 hours in individuals with genotype insertion/insertion and deletion/deletion (mean 21% and 28%, respectively). Data suggest that intake of dark chocolate containing high amount of cocoa inhibits ACE activity in vitro and in vivo.

Keywords
cocoa, dark chocolate, angiotensin-converting enzyme, genotyping, nitric oxide
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-66332 (URN)10.1097/FJC.0b013e3181fe62e3 (DOI)000286178000007 ()20966764 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-03-11 Created: 2011-03-11 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Persson, I.-L. A., Persson, K., Hägg, S. & Andersson, R. G. (2010). Effects of green tea, black tea and Rooibos tea on angiotensin-converting enzyme and nitric oxide in healthy volunteers. Public Health Nutrition, 13(5), 730-737
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of green tea, black tea and Rooibos tea on angiotensin-converting enzyme and nitric oxide in healthy volunteers
2010 (English)In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 730-737Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Tea has been reported to reduce cardiovascular mortality, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. The aim of the current project was to investigate the effect of green tea (Japanese Sencha), black tea (Indian Assam B.O.P.) and Rooibos tea (South Africa) on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and nitric oxide (NO). DESIGN: Seventeen healthy volunteers received a single oral dose of 400 ml green tea, black tea or Rooibos tea in a randomized, three-phase, crossover study. ACE activity and NO concentration were measured (at 0, 30, 60 and 180 min) in all phases. ACE activity was analysed by means of a commercial radioenzymatic assay. Nitrite was analysed as a marker of NO concentration. In addition, ACE genotype was determined using a PCR method. RESULTS: Oral intake of a single dose of Rooibos tea significantly inhibited ACE activity after 30 min (P < 0.01) and after 60 min (P < 0.05). A significant inhibition of ACE activity was seen with green tea for the ACE II genotype 30 min after intake of the tea (P < 0.05) and for the ACE ID genotype 60 min after intake (P < 0.05). A significant inhibition of ACE activity was also seen with Rooibos tea for the ACE II genotype 60 min after intake (P < 0.05). No significant effect on NO concentration was seen. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that green tea and Rooibos tea may have cardiovascular effects through inhibition of ACE activity.

Keywords
Tea, Angiotensin-converting enxyme, Nitric oxide
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-55073 (URN)10.1017/S1368980010000170 (DOI)000277379500018 ()20144258 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-04-28 Created: 2010-04-28 Last updated: 2017-12-12
Felixsson, E., Persson, I.-L. A. L., Eriksson, A. C. & Persson, K. (2010). Horse chestnut extract contracts bovine vessels and affects human platelet aggregation through 5-HT(2A) receptors: an in vitro study. Phytotherapy Research, 24(9), 1297-1301
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Horse chestnut extract contracts bovine vessels and affects human platelet aggregation through 5-HT(2A) receptors: an in vitro study
2010 (English)In: Phytotherapy Research, ISSN 0951-418X, E-ISSN 1099-1573, Vol. 24, no 9, p. 1297-1301Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Extract from seeds and bark of horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum L) is used as an herbal medicine against chronic venous insufficiency. The effect and mechanism of action on veins, arteries, and platelets are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanisms of action of horse chestnut on the contraction of bovine mesenteric veins and arteries, and human platelet aggregation. Contraction studies showed that horse chestnut extract dose-dependently contracted both veins and arteries, with the veins being the most sensitive. Contraction of both veins and arteries were significantly inhibited by the 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist ketanserin. No effect on contraction was seen with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin, the alpha(1) receptor antagonist prazosin or the angiotensin AT(1) receptor antagonist saralasin neither in veins nor arteries. ADP-induced human platelet aggregation was significantly reduced by horse chestnut. A further reduction was seen with the extract in the presence of ketanserin. In conclusion, horse chestnut contraction of both veins and arteries is, at least partly, mediated through 5-HT(2A) receptors. Human platelet aggregation is reduced by horse chestnut. The clinical importance of these findings concerning clinical use, possible adverse effects, and drug interactions remains to be investigated. Copyright (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Keywords
arterial contraction; 5-HT; horse chestnut extract; platelet aggregation; venous contraction.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-59047 (URN)10.1002/ptr.3103 (DOI)20148408 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-09-07 Created: 2010-09-07 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Persson, I. & Persson, K. (2010). Letter to Editor: The Pharmaceutist in the Roll as Educationalist/informant - Programme Description of Drugpedagogics [Letter to the editor]. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2(suppl 4), 1-2
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Letter to Editor: The Pharmaceutist in the Roll as Educationalist/informant - Programme Description of Drugpedagogics
2010 (English)In: International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, ISSN 0975-1491, Vol. 2, no suppl 4, p. 1-2Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

This is a description of a 7.5 ECTS credits course in drug-pedagogics suitable for pharmacy students. The aim of this course is to provide the students with skills as informants/communicators concerning drugs and use at individual, group and community levels. The course includes advanced studies in drug-pedagogics from psychological, sociological and pharmacological perspective. The examination consists of an individual implementation of oral drug information to a group.

Keywords
Drug-pedagogics, Pharmacy-students
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-61600 (URN)
Available from: 2010-11-17 Created: 2010-11-17 Last updated: 2012-06-29Bibliographically approved
Persson, I. (2010). Växter mot smärta och inflammation. Smärta (2), 8-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Växter mot smärta och inflammation
2010 (Swedish)In: Smärta, no 2, p. 8-10Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sveriges sjuksköterskor inom området smärta, 2010
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-56706 (URN)
Available from: 2010-06-01 Created: 2010-05-31 Last updated: 2010-06-08
Persson, I., Persson, K. & Andersson, R. (2009). Effect of Vaccinium myrtillus and Its Polyphenols on Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Activity in Human Endothelial Cells. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 57(11), 4626-4629
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of Vaccinium myrtillus and Its Polyphenols on Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Activity in Human Endothelial Cells
2009 (English)In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, ISSN 0021-8561, E-ISSN 1520-5118, Vol. 57, no 11, p. 4626-4629Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates if the connection between Vaccinium myrtillus and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) might be an explanation of the pharmacological effects on circulation. Cultured endothelial cells from human umbilical veins were incubated with bilberry 25E extract. The main anthocyanidins combined in myrtillin chloride and separately in cyanidin, delphinidin, and malvidin, respectively, were examined concerning their effects on ACE. After 10 min of incubation with bilberry 25E, a significant, dose-dependent inhibition of ACE activity was seen, and after incubation with myrtillin chloride a significant inhibition was seen. No effect was seen with the anthocyanidins. The effect seems to be dependent on this specific mixture of anthocyanins in the bilberry. V. myrtillus may thus have the potential to prevent and protect against cardiovascular diseases.

Keywords
Angiotensin-converting enzyme; Vaccinium myrtillus; anthocyanidins
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-18654 (URN)10.1021/jf900128s (DOI)
Note

On the day of the defence date the status of this article was Submitted.

Available from: 2009-06-03 Created: 2009-06-03 Last updated: 2018-03-27Bibliographically approved
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