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Cromdal, J., Danby, S., Emmison, M., Osvaldsson, K. & Cobb-More, C. (2018). "Basically it's the Usual Whole Teen Girl Thing": Stage-of-Life Categories on a Children's and Young people's Helpline. Symbolic interaction, 41(1), 25-44
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Basically it's the Usual Whole Teen Girl Thing": Stage-of-Life Categories on a Children's and Young people's Helpline
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2018 (English)In: Symbolic interaction, ISSN 0195-6086, E-ISSN 1533-8665, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 25-44Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article explores the practices of membership categorization in the interactions of clients and counselors on a national Australian helpline (Kids Helpline [KHL]) for children and young persons. Our focus is on membership categories drawn from three membership category devices (MCDs): stage-of-life (SOL), age, and family. Analysis draws on data across different contact modalities—email and web-counseling sessions—to examine how category-generated features are relevantly occasioned, attended to, and managed by the parties in the course of interaction. This shows clients' use of MCDs in presenting their trouble and building a relevant case for their grievance. By examining counselors' subsequent receipts of the clients' complaints, we are able to trace some of the cultural knowledge that the clients' categorizations make relevant to the counselors. Moreover, the analysis demonstrates how the inherent flexibility of MCDs allows counselors to exploit these same categorial resources and to re-specify the clients' trouble in a more positive fashion to accomplish counseling work. In explicating how taken-for-granted notions of the lifespan as well as of family relations are mobilized by participants in KHL's sessions, the findings contribute to previous studies of social interaction in counseling, and to research on social identity and categorization more broadly.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2018
Keywords
ethnomethodology, helpline interaction, membership categorization analysis, stage of life categories, youth problems
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-141592 (URN)10.1002/symb.320 (DOI)000424666100002 ()2-s2.0-85041671323 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-02 Created: 2017-10-02 Last updated: 2018-02-23Bibliographically approved
Deppermann, A., Laurier, E. & Mondada, L. (2018). Overtaking as an interactional achievement: Video analyses of participants' practices in traffic. Gesprächsforschung, 19, 1-131
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Overtaking as an interactional achievement: Video analyses of participants' practices in traffic
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2018 (English)In: Gesprächsforschung, ISSN 1617-1837, E-ISSN 1617-1837, Vol. 19, p. 1-131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article we pursue a systematic and extensive study of overtaking in traffic as an interactional event. Our focus is on the accountable organisation and accom-plishment of overtaking by road users in real-world traffic situations. Data and anal-ysis are drawn from multiple research groups studying driving from an ethnometh-odological and conversation analytic perspective. Building on multimodal and se-quential analyses of video recordings of overtaking events, the article describes the shared practices which overtakers and overtaken parties use in displaying, recog-nising and coordinating their manoeuvres. It examines the three sequential phases of an overtaking event: preparation and projection; the overtaking proper; the re-alignment post-phase including retrospective accounts and assessments. We iden-tify how during each of these phases drivers and passengers organise intra-vehicle and inter-vehicle practices: driving and non-driving related talk between vehicle-occupants, the emerging spatiotemporal ecology of the road, and the driving actions of other road users. The data is derived from a two camera set-up recording the road ahead and car interior. The recordings are from three settings: daily commuting, driving lessons, race-car coaching. The events occur on a variety of road types (mo-torways, country roads, city streets, a race track, etc.), in six languages (English, Finnish, French, German, Italian, and Swedish) and in seven countries (Australia, Finland, France, Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, and the UK). From an exception-ally diverse collection of video data, the study of which is made possible thanks to the innovative collaboration of multiple researchers, the article exhibits the range of practical challenges and communicative skills involved in overtaking.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mannheim, Germany: Verlag für Gesprächsforschung, 2018
Keywords
conversation analysis, ethnomethodology, multimodality, driving, traffic, mobility, overtaking, coordination, driving lessons, car racing
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149905 (URN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2012-5367
Available from: 2018-08-01 Created: 2018-08-01 Last updated: 2018-08-15Bibliographically approved
St. John, O. & Cromdal, J. (2016). Crafting instructions collaboratively: Student questions and dual addressivity in classroom task instructions. Discourse processes, 53, 252-279
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Crafting instructions collaboratively: Student questions and dual addressivity in classroom task instructions
2016 (English)In: Discourse processes, ISSN 0163-853X, E-ISSN 1532-6950, ISSN 0163-853X, Vol. 53, p. 252-279Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examines classroom task instructions—phases traditionally associatedwith noninteractional objectives and operations—and reveals their compositionas interactionally complex and cocrafted. Analyses of video sequences of taskinstructional activity from three different secondary school lessons show thatstudent questions routinely contribute to making task instructions followable. In thisenvironment, student questions set up tensions between the demand to respond tothe individual and responsibility to uphold the general instructional agenda. Datashow that, as addressees of student questions, instructors take great care to meetboth individual and collective accountabilities. To meet obligation to the addresseeand exploit the instructional benefit of the question for the cohort, dualaddressivity—targeting two or more addressees in response to a student question—proves a crucial method for achieving such principled practice. Educationally, itappears vital to recognize student instructed action as integral to task-relatedlearning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2016
Keywords
Addressivity; Conversation Analysis; Classroom interaction; Instructions; Questions
National Category
Educational Sciences Pedagogical Work Didactics Social Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127361 (URN)10.1080/0163853X.2015.1038128 (DOI)000375001900002 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Note

Funding agencies:  Committee for Educational Sciences of the Swedish Research Council

Available from: 2016-04-22 Created: 2016-04-22 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Weatherall, A., Danby, S., Osvaldsson, K., Cromdal, J. & Emmison, M. (2016). Pranking in children's helpline calls. Australian Journal of Linguistics, 36(2), 224-238
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pranking in children's helpline calls
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2016 (English)In: Australian Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0726-8602, E-ISSN 1469-2996, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 224-238Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pranking can be understood as challenging a normative social order. One environment where pranking occurs is in institutional interaction. The present study examines a sample of pranking calls to telephone helplines for children and young people. Some cases had been posted on YouTube by the person doing the pranking; others were from a subcollection of possible pranks, extracted from a larger corpus of Australian children’s counselling helpline calls. Drawing on ethnomethodology and conversation analysis we aim to understand the inferential and sequential resources involved in pranking within telephone-mediated counselling services for children and youth. Our analysis shows pranksters know the norms of counselling helplines by their practices employed for subverting them. YouTube pranksters exploit next turns of talk to retrospectively cast what the counsellor has just said as a possible challenge to the perception of the call as anormal counselling one. One practice evident in both sources was the setting up of provocative traps to break a linguistic taboo. This detailed study of pranking in interaction provides documentary evidence of its idiosyncratic yet patterned local accomplishment in telephone-mediated counselling services aimed at children and youth.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2016
Keywords
Conversation analysis; Counselling; Hoax; Indentity; Membership Categorization; YouTube
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology) Social Work Communication Studies General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125712 (URN)10.1080/07268602.2015.1121532 (DOI)000371913300005 ()
Projects
Australian Research Council under Discovery grant (Project ID: DP0773185)
Funder
Australian Research Council, DP0773185
Available from: 2016-03-01 Created: 2016-03-01 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Danby, S., Cromdal, J., Rendle-Short, J., Butler, C., Osvaldsson Cromdal, K. & Emmison, M. (2015). Parentification: Counselling talk on a helpline for children and young people. In: Michelle O'Reilly & Jessica Nina Lester (Ed.), The Palgrave Handbook of Child Mental Health: (pp. 578-596). Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parentification: Counselling talk on a helpline for children and young people
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2015 (English)In: The Palgrave Handbook of Child Mental Health / [ed] Michelle O'Reilly & Jessica Nina Lester, Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, p. 578-596Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This Handbook illustrates the importance of examining child mental health from a different perspective, one that assumes that psychiatric categories are made real in and through both written and spoken language. It gathers a range of applied and theoretical analyses from leading scholars and clinicians in order to examine the conversational practices of children diagnosed with mental health disorders alongside those of their parents, families and practitioners. The contributors move away from viewing mental illness as an objective truth; instead reintroducing the relevance of language in constructing and deconstructing the assumptions that surround the diagnosis and treatment of childhood mental health disorders. Including chapters on ADHD, autism, depression, eating disorders and trauma, this collection addresses the diversity involved in discussing child mental health.Divided into six parts: the place of conversation/discourse analysis; critical approaches; social constructions of normal/abnormal; situating and exploring the difficulties involved; managing problem behaviour and discussing different practices involved; this Handbook presents a comprehensive overview of child mental health. It is an essential reference resource for all those involved or interested in child mental health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Palgrave Macmillan, 2015
National Category
Psychology Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Sociology Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-119511 (URN)978-11-3742-830-1 (ISBN)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2005-0236Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1514
Available from: 2015-06-18 Created: 2015-06-18 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Cromdal, J. & Tholander, M. (2014). Morality in professional practice. Journal of Applied Linguistics and Professional Practice, 9(2), 155-164
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Morality in professional practice
2014 (English)In: Journal of Applied Linguistics and Professional Practice, ISSN 2040-3658, E-ISSN 2040-3666, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 155-164Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Equinox Publishing, 2014
National Category
Sociology Psychology Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-116647 (URN)10.1558/japl.v9i2.25734 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-03-30 Created: 2015-03-30 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Cromdal, J. (2013). Bilingual and second language interactions: Views from Scandinavia. International Journal of Bilingualism, 17(2), 121-131
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bilingual and second language interactions: Views from Scandinavia
2013 (English)In: International Journal of Bilingualism, ISSN 1367-0069, E-ISSN 1756-6878, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 121-131Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
National Category
Sociology Humanities Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-89267 (URN)10.1177/1367006912441415 (DOI)000318794900001 ()
Available from: 2013-02-25 Created: 2013-02-25 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Osvaldsson, K., Persson Thunqvist, D. & Cromdal, J. (2013). Comprehension checks, clarifications, and corrections in an emergency call with a nonnative speaker of Swedish. International Journal of Bilingualism, 17(2), 205-220
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comprehension checks, clarifications, and corrections in an emergency call with a nonnative speaker of Swedish
2013 (English)In: International Journal of Bilingualism, ISSN 1367-0069, E-ISSN 1756-6878, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 205-220Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article reports on a case study of an emergency call with a 12-year-old girl, who is hearably not a native speaker of Swedish. A sequential analysis of the recorded call revealed two interesting interactional practices through which the participants can be seen to pursue mutual understanding. The first type of practice involves the participants’ orientation toward potential or projected problems of comprehension and should therefore be understood in terms of preemptive management of mutual understanding. This is chiefly accomplished by either party (a) making sure that the other party has understood; (b) checking the correctness and adequacy of one’s own understanding; and finally (c) displaying one’s own understanding of the other party en passant, that is, without requiring the other party’s confirmation. The second type of practice, commonly known as conversational repair, is used to deal with established problems of comprehension. The methods through which these problems are managed involve (d) repeating and paraphrasing preceding turns or their problematic fragments; (e) finding alternative ways of talking about demonstrably noncomprehended information; and finally (f) postponing such problematic exchanges. The study demonstrates that despite the institutionally asymmetric character of emergency calls, both participants are actively engaged in working toward intersubjectivity, and the analysis identifies several different ways through which the parties orient to and handle interactional trouble so as to secure mutual comprehension in a socially smooth yet efficient manner.

Keywords
Adult–child interaction, clarifications, comprehension, conversation analysis, emergency calls, institutional interaction, nonnative speaker
National Category
Humanities Sociology Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-78044 (URN)10.1177/1367006912441420 (DOI)000318794900006 ()
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P2007-0837:1-E
Available from: 2012-06-05 Created: 2012-06-05 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Cromdal, J. (2013). Conversation analysis and emergency calls. In: Carol A. Chapelle (Ed.), The Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics: (pp. 982-985). Wiley-Blackwell
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conversation analysis and emergency calls
2013 (English)In: The Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics / [ed] Carol A. Chapelle, Wiley-Blackwell, 2013, p. 982-985Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Calls for emergency assistance are operated by a range of organizations across the world, including local police authorities, medical institutions, and dedicated dispatch centers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2013
Keywords
conversation analysis; emergency calls; institutional interaction; language and social interaction
National Category
Sociology Social Psychology Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-84559 (URN)10.1002/9781405198431.wbeal1308 (DOI)9781405198431 (ISBN)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2012-10-12 Created: 2012-10-12 Last updated: 2018-02-23
Cromdal, J., Broth, M. & Levin, L. (2013). Förarutbildning i praktiken: En studie av lärande i trafikförankrad interaktion. Stockholm
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Förarutbildning i praktiken: En studie av lärande i trafikförankrad interaktion
2013 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: , 2013. p. 10-11
Series
Forskning pågår - Individents lärande
National Category
Social Sciences Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-90245 (URN)
Available from: 2013-03-22 Created: 2013-03-22 Last updated: 2015-09-22
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2314-4942

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