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Abrahamsson, Thomas
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 21) Show all publications
Zamir, I., Tornevi, A., Abrahamsson, T., Ahlsson, F., Engström, E., Hallberg, B., . . . Domellöf, M. (2018). Hyperglycemia in Extremely Preterm Infants-Insulin Treatment, Mortality and Nutrient Intakes. Journal of Pediatric Surgery Case Reports, 200, 104-110.e1
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hyperglycemia in Extremely Preterm Infants-Insulin Treatment, Mortality and Nutrient Intakes
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery Case Reports, ISSN 0022-3476, E-ISSN 2213-5766, Vol. 200, p. 104-110.e1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

To explore the prevalence of hyperglycemia and the associations between nutritional intakes, hyperglycemia, insulin treatment, and mortality in extremely preterm infants.

Study design

Prospectively collected data from the Extremely Preterm Infants in Sweden Study (EXPRESS) was used in this study and included 580 infants born <27 gestational weeks during 2004-2007. Available glucose measurements (n = 9850) as well as insulin treatment and nutritional data were obtained retrospectively from hospital records for the first 28 postnatal days as well as 28- and 70-day mortality data.

Results

Daily prevalence of hyperglycemia >180 mg/dL (10 mmol/L) of up to 30% was observed during the first 2 postnatal weeks, followed by a slow decrease in its occurrence thereafter. Generalized additive model analysis showed that increasing parenteral carbohydrate supply with 1 g/kg/day was associated with a 1.6% increase in glucose concentration (P < .001). Hyperglycemia was associated with more than double the 28-day mortality risk (P < .01). In a logistic regressionmodel, insulin treatment was associated with lower 28- and 70-day mortality when given to infants with hyperglycemia irrespective of the duration of the hyperglycemic episode (P < .05).

Conclusions

Hyperglycemia is common in extremely preterm infants throughout the first postnatal month. Glucose infusions seem to have only a minimal impact on glucose concentrations. In the EXPRESS cohort, insulin treatment was associated with lower mortality in infants with hyperglycemia. Current practices of hyperglycemia treatment in extremely preterm infants should be reevaluated and assessed in randomized controlled clinical trials.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Philadelphia, PA, United States: Mosby, Inc., 2018
Keywords
neonatology; nutrition
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155864 (URN)10.1016/j.jpeds.2018.03.049 (DOI)29731360 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046719751 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-29 Created: 2019-03-29 Last updated: 2019-04-04Bibliographically approved
Abrahamsson, T. (2016). Editorial Material: Not all probiotic strains prevent necrotising enterocolitis in premature infants in LANCET, vol 387, issue 10019, pp 624-625. The Lancet, 387(10019), 624-625
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial Material: Not all probiotic strains prevent necrotising enterocolitis in premature infants in LANCET, vol 387, issue 10019, pp 624-625
2016 (English)In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 387, no 10019, p. 624-625Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

n/a

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2016
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125805 (URN)10.1016/S0140-6736(15)01090-9 (DOI)000369837100005 ()
Available from: 2016-03-08 Created: 2016-03-04 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Abrahamsson, T., You Wu, R. & Jenmalm, M. (2015). Gut microbiota and allergy: the importance of the pregnancy period. Pediatric Research, 77(1), 214-219
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gut microbiota and allergy: the importance of the pregnancy period
2015 (English)In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 77, no 1, p. 214-219Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Limited microbial exposure is suggested to underlie the increase of allergic diseases in affluent countries, and bacterial diversity seems to be more important than specific bacteria taxa. Prospective studies indicate that the gut microbiota composition during the first months of life influences allergy development, and support the theory that factors influencing the early maturation of the immune system might be important for subsequent allergic disease. However, recent research indicates that microbial exposure during pregnancy may be even more important for the preventative effects against allergic disease. This review gives a background of the epidemiology, immunology, and microbiology literature in this field. It focuses on possible underlying mechanisms such as immune-regulated epigenetic imprinting and bacterial translocation during pregnancy, potentially providing the offspring with a pioneer microbiome. We suggest that a possible reason for the initial exposure of bacterial molecular patterns to the fetus in utero is to prime the immune system and/or the epithelium to respond appropriately to pathogens and commensals after birth.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group: Open Access Hybrid Model Option A, 2015
National Category
Clinical Medicine Microbiology in the medical area Immunology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114252 (URN)10.1038/pr.2014.165 (DOI)000347672800016 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Biogaia AB, Sweden

Available from: 2015-02-16 Created: 2015-02-16 Last updated: 2018-02-28
Christmann, B. S., Abrahamsson, T., Bernstein, C. N., Wayne Duck, L., Mannon, P. J., Berg, G., . . . Elson, C. O. (2015). Human seroreactivity to gut microbiota antigens. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 136(5), 1378-1386
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human seroreactivity to gut microbiota antigens
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 136, no 5, p. 1378-1386Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Although immune responses directed against antigens from the intestinal microbiota are observed in certain diseases, the normal human adaptive immune response to intestinal microbiota is poorly defined. Objective: Our goal was to assess the adaptive immune response to the intestinal microbiota present in 143 healthy adults and compare this response with the response observed in 52 children and their mothers at risk of having allergic disease. Methods: Human serum was collected from adults and children followed from birth to 7 years of age, and the serum IgG response to a panel of intestinal microbiota antigens was assessed by using a novel protein microarray. Results: Nearly every subject tested, regardless of health status, had serum IgG that recognized a common set of antigens. Seroreactivity to the panel of antigens was significantly lower in atopic adults. Healthy infants expressed the highest level of IgG seroreactivity to intestinal microbiota antigens. This adaptive response developed between 6 and 12 months of age and peaked around 2 years of age. Low IgG responses to certain clusters of microbiota antigens during infancy were associated with allergy development during childhood. Conclusions: There is an observed perturbation of the adaptive response to antigens from the microbiota in allergic subjects. These perturbations are observable even in childhood, suggesting that optimal stimulation of the adaptive immune system by the microbiota might be needed to prevent certain immune-mediated diseases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MOSBY-ELSEVIER, 2015
Keywords
Adaptive; atopy; allergy; childhood; IgG; microarray; microbiota; bacterial antigens; bacterial antibodies
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123148 (URN)10.1016/j.jaci.2015.03.036 (DOI)000364787200028 ()26014812 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|National Institutes of Health [DK071176]; Swedish Research Council [K2011-56X-21854-01-06]; Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation [20050514]; Ekhaga Foundation [210-53]; Research Council for the South-East Sweden; Olle Engqvist Foundation; Swedish Asthma and Allergy Association; Vardal Foundation for Health Care Science and Allergy Research, Sweden [B2007 042]; University Hospital of Linkoping, Sweden

Available from: 2015-12-07 Created: 2015-12-04 Last updated: 2017-12-01
Jakobsson, H. E., Abrahamsson, T., Jenmalm, M. C., Harris, K., Quince, C., Jernberg, C., . . . Andersson, A. F. (2014). Decreased gut microbiota diversity, delayed Bacteroidetes colonisation and reduced Th1 responses in infants delivered by Caesarean section. Gut, 63(4), 559-566
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decreased gut microbiota diversity, delayed Bacteroidetes colonisation and reduced Th1 responses in infants delivered by Caesarean section
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2014 (English)In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 63, no 4, p. 559-566Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective The early intestinal microbiota exerts important stimuli for immune development, and a reduced microbial exposure as well as caesarean section (CS) has been associated with the development of allergic disease. Here we address how microbiota development in infants is affected by mode of delivery, and relate differences in colonisation patterns to the maturation of a balanced Th1/Th2 immune response.

Design The postnatal intestinal colonisation pattern was investigated in 24 infants, born vaginally (15) or by CS (nine). The intestinal microbiota were characterised using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes at 1 week and 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after birth. Venous blood levels of Th1- and Th2-associated chemokines were measured at 6, 12 and 24 months.

Results Infants born through CS had lower total microbiota diversity during the first 2 years of life. CS delivered infants also had a lower abundance and diversity of the Bacteroidetes phylum and were less often colonised with the Bacteroidetes phylum. Infants born through CS had significantly lower levels of the Th1-associated chemokines CXCL10 and CXCL11 in blood.

Conclusions CS was associated with a lower total microbial diversity, delayed colonisation of the Bacteroidetes phylum and reduced Th1 responses during the first 2 years of life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MJ PUBLISHING GROUP, 2014
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102209 (URN)10.1136/gutjnl-2012-303249 (DOI)000332267500006 ()23926244 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-12-03 Created: 2013-12-03 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Abrahamsson, T. & Sherman, P. M. (2014). Editorial Material: Multifaceted Effects of Human Milk Oligosaccharides. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 209(3), 323-324
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial Material: Multifaceted Effects of Human Milk Oligosaccharides
2014 (English)In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0022-1899, E-ISSN 1537-6613, Vol. 209, no 3, p. 323-324Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

n/a

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of Chicago Press / Oxford University Press (OUP): Policy A1 - Oxford Open Option C, 2014
Keywords
prebiotics; breast milk; microbiota; microbiome; urinary infection; anti-adhesive
National Category
Clinical Medicine Other Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111348 (URN)10.1093/infdis/jit559 (DOI)000329921700004 ()24154736 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-11-18 Created: 2014-10-15 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Abrahamsson, T., Rautava, S., Moore, A. M., Neu, J. & Sherman, P. M. (2014). Editorial Material: The Time for a Confirmative Necrotizing Enterocolitis Probiotics Prevention Trial in the Extremely Low Birth Weight Infant in North America Is Now! in JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS, vol 165, issue 2, pp 389-394. Journal of Pediatrics, 165(2), 389-394
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial Material: The Time for a Confirmative Necrotizing Enterocolitis Probiotics Prevention Trial in the Extremely Low Birth Weight Infant in North America Is Now! in JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS, vol 165, issue 2, pp 389-394
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2014 (English)In: Journal of Pediatrics, ISSN 0022-3476, E-ISSN 1097-6833, Vol. 165, no 2, p. 389-394Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

n/a

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111287 (URN)10.1016/j.jpeds.2014.05.012 (DOI)000341435800037 ()24948349 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-10-14 Created: 2014-10-14 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Abrahamsson, T., Jakobsson, H., Andersson, A., Björksten, B., Engstrand, L. & Jenmalm, M. (2014). Low gut microbiota diversity in early infancy precedes asthma at school age. Clinical and Experimental Allergy, 44(6), 842-850
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Low gut microbiota diversity in early infancy precedes asthma at school age
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2014 (English)In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 842-850Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Low total diversity of the gut microbiota during the first year of life is associated with allergic diseases in infancy, but little is known how early microbial diversity is related to allergic disease later in school age.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess microbial diversity and characterize the dominant bacteria in stool during the first year of life in relation to the prevalence of different allergic diseases in school age, such as asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC) and eczema.

METHODS:

The microbial diversity and composition was analysed with barcoded 16S rDNA 454 pyrosequencing in stool samples at 1 week, 1 month and 12 months of age in 47 infants which were subsequently assessed for allergic disease and skin prick test reactivity at 7 years of age (ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01285830).

RESULTS:

Children developing asthma (n = 8) had a lower diversity of the total microbiota than non-asthmatic children at 1 week (P = 0.04) and 1 month (P = 0.003) of age, whereas allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (n = 13), eczema (n = 12) and positive skin prick reactivity (n = 14) at 7 years of age did not associate with the gut microbiota diversity. Neither was asthma associated with the microbiota composition later in infancy (at 12 months). Children having IgE-associated eczema in infancy and subsequently developing asthma had lower microbial diversity than those that did not. There were no significant differences, however, in relative abundance of bacterial phyla and genera between children with or without allergic disease.

CONCLUSION AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

Low total diversity of the gut microbiota during the first month of life was associated with asthma but not ARC in children at 7 years of age. Measures affecting microbial colonization of the infant during the first month of life may impact asthma development in childhood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2014
Keywords
asthma; allergic rhinoconjunctivitis; birth; children; diversity; hygiene hypothesis; microbiota; molecular microbiology
National Category
Clinical Medicine Cell and Molecular Biology Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109137 (URN)10.1111/cea.12253 (DOI)000337529100006 ()24330256 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-08-13 Created: 2014-08-11 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Stensson, M., Koch, G., Coric, S., Abrahamsson, T., Jenmalm, M., Birkhed, D. & Wendt, L.-W. (2014). Oral Administration of Lactobacillus reuteri during the First Year of Life Reduces Caries Prevalence in the Primary Dentition at 9 Years of Age. Caries Research, 48(2), 111-117
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oral Administration of Lactobacillus reuteri during the First Year of Life Reduces Caries Prevalence in the Primary Dentition at 9 Years of Age
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2014 (English)In: Caries Research, ISSN 0008-6568, E-ISSN 1421-976X, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 111-117Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect on oral health, at age 9 years, of daily oral supplementation with the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri, strain ATCC 55730, to mothers during the last month of gestation and to children through the first year of life. The study was a single-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial involving 113 children: 60 in the probiotic and 53 in the placebo group. The subjects underwent clinical and radiographic examination of the primary dentition and carious lesions, plaque and gingivitis were recorded. Saliva and plaque were sampled for determination of mutans streptococci (MS) and lactobacilli (LB) in saliva and plaque as well as salivary secretory IgA (SIgA). Forty-nine (82%) children in the probiotic group and 31 (58%) in the placebo group were caries-free (p < 0.01). The prevalence of approximal caries lesions was lower in the probiotic group (0.67 ± 1.61 vs. 1.53 ± 2.64; p < 0.05) and there were fewer sites with gingivitis compared to the placebo group (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to frequency of toothbrushing, plaque and dietary habits, but to intake of fluoride supplements (p < 0.05). There were no intergroup differences with respect to L. reuteri, MS, LB or SIgA in saliva. Within the limitation of this study it seems that daily supplementation with L. reuteri from birth and during the first year of life is associated with reduced caries prevalence and gingivitis score in the primary dentition at 9 years of age.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
S. Karger, 2014
Keywords
Caries, Children, Gingivitis, Lactobacilli, Mutans streptococci, Probiotics, Saliva

National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102208 (URN)10.1159/000354412 (DOI)000331773600005 ()
Available from: 2013-12-03 Created: 2013-12-03 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Forsberg, A., Abrahamsson, T., Björkstén, B. & Jenmalm, M. (2014). Pre- and postnatal administration of Lactobacillus reuteri decreases TLR2 responses in infants.. Clinical and translational allergy, 4, 1-7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pre- and postnatal administration of Lactobacillus reuteri decreases TLR2 responses in infants.
2014 (English)In: Clinical and translational allergy, ISSN 2045-7022, Vol. 4, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Mice models indicate that intact Toll like receptor (TLR) signaling may be essential for the allergy protective effects of diverse bacterial exposure observed in clinical trials and epidemiological studies. Probiotic supplementation with Lactobacillus reuteri from pregnancy week 36 and to the infant through the first year of life decreased the prevalence of IgE-associated eczema at two years (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01285830). The effect of this supplementation on innate immune responses to bacterial products and the expression of associated TLRs were explored.

METHODS: Blood mononuclear cells were collected at birth, 6, 12 and 24 months from 61 infants and cultured with TLR2, 4 and 9 ligands. Cytokine and chemokine secretion was determined as well as TLR2, 4 and 9 mRNA expression.

RESULTS: Probiotic supplementation was associated with decreased LTA (lipoteichoic acid) induced CCL4, CXCL8, IL-1β and IL-6 responses at 12 months and decreased CCL4 and IL-1β secretion at 24 months. TLR2 mRNA expression was not affected by probiotic treatment.

CONCLUSIONS: Decreased responses to TLR2, the main receptor for LTA from Gram positive bacteria, in probiotic treated children seem to be dependent on factors downstream of TLR mRNA expression.

Keywords
Angina pectoris; Coronary ostial stenosis; Takayasu
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111347 (URN)10.1186/2045-7022-4-21 (DOI)25002964 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-11-18 Created: 2014-10-15 Last updated: 2017-10-26
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