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Glad, Wiktoria
Publications (10 of 53) Show all publications
Glad, W. (2017). Everyday governance of energy systems. Procedia Engineering, 180, 1612-1621
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Everyday governance of energy systems
2017 (English)In: Procedia Engineering, ISSN 1877-7058, E-ISSN 1877-7058, Vol. 180, p. 1612-1621Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The proposed transition to a low-carbon society faces challenges, as it is occurring too slowly to achieve the goals set by international and national governmental bodies, and gaps are found between available energy-efficiency technologies and their appropriate use. The governance of domestic energy systems has attracted European research attention, and the findings illustrate how materials, competence, and meaning influence energy productivity in domestic settings and how accountability is enacted by connecting people and technologies. The present research cites Swedish examples of how energy efficiency has been improved by involving multiple local actors, such as consumers, energy utilities, property companies, and local governments. Examples are analysed through the lens of social change and mundane governance theory, illustrating how spaces and places often overlooked as too mundane to be considered in policy prove, when analysed in more detail, to be important for energy efficiency. The results indicate that “governance pairs” (e.g., “households/lighting” and “caretakers/heating systems”) are more or less successfully held together and influence accountability and governance possibilities. The present analyses demonstrate that, while governance is often portrayed in terms of causality, everyday practices involving governance pairs are messier and less predictable than anticipated. These results call for the upgrading of research into everyday life and for bottom–up approaches to energy studies. Accountability – crucial to closing the energy-efficiency gap and understood in the context of mundane governance – can advance our energy-efficiency thinking and action.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
energy systems, households, energy efficiency, governance, management
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Building Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-137711 (URN)10.1016/j.proeng.2017.04.324 (DOI)000404873600167 ()
Projects
Formas - Everday life
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2017-05-26 Created: 2017-05-26 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Glad, W., Axelsson, B. & Höijer, J. (2017). Hot (water) topics: The formation of an energy issue at home. In: Therese Laitinen Lindström, Ylva Blume & Margareta Regebro (Ed.), eceee 2017 Summer Study on energy efficiency: Consumption, efficiency and limits. Paper presented at eceee Summer Study 2017 (pp. 2069-2074).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hot (water) topics: The formation of an energy issue at home
2017 (English)In: eceee 2017 Summer Study on energy efficiency: Consumption, efficiency and limits / [ed] Therese Laitinen Lindström, Ylva Blume & Margareta Regebro, 2017, p. 2069-2074Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Domestic use of hot water has been identified as an urgent energy issue to address. In this paper, results from focus group interviews, with both residents and staff members, are presented. Results show that hot tap water use is differently shaped depending on whether you are a resident or a staff member. One thing in common was that in the focus groups it was difficult to separate hot tap water use from water use in general. Hot tap water use was not distinguished from use of cold tap water. To explore the issue further, the research on hot water was taken to residents’ homes and through more in-depth qualitative methods by an artist a formation process was started. Residents started to share more detailed stories about how they lived their everyday life in kitchens and bathrooms. These stories contain childhood memories and how past experience has shaped their water use and consequently their energy use patterns. The formation of this topic continued and in the artist’s interpretation of the data, three different artefacts became important: the sink, tub and toilet. These artefacts were placed in a river in the centre of a city as part of an audio walk with voices from the residents talking about their use of water. The exhibition was available during summer 2016 and the audio walk with the voices are planned to be reused and part of an exhibition in 2017.

Series
eceee Summer Studies proceedings, ISSN 1653-7025, E-ISSN 2001-7960
Keywords
energy. households, hot water, gestaltning, focus group interviews, energi, hushåll, varmvatten, gestaltning, fokusgruppintervjuer
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Humanities and the Arts Cultural Studies Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-137780 (URN)978-91-983878-0-3 (ISBN)978-91-983878-1-0 (ISBN)
Conference
eceee Summer Study 2017
Available from: 2017-05-29 Created: 2017-05-29 Last updated: 2018-07-04Bibliographically approved
Klindt, M. P., Costa, D., Dopheide, E., Glad, W. & Tikkanen, T. (2017). Measuring University-Society Collaboration: Recommendations for University of Aveiro. Aalborg: Aalborg University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measuring University-Society Collaboration: Recommendations for University of Aveiro
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2017 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This document is a strategic project report for the University of Aveiro (UA) that addresses the university’s ambition of institutionalizing and measuring collaboration with society. In recent years, responding to developments in Portugal’s higher education policy UA has developed institutional data in order to support performance monitoring, strategic planning and decision-making. The university is well equipped with performance indicators as regards research and education. But how can UA assess the work that faculty and students are doing within the broader regional community and how can impact of collaboration be measured? Based on research literature, the report discusses the prospects and pitfalls of measuring universities’ third mission. The report then compares how four other European universities manage university-society collaboration including how they measure impact. The report finalizes by presenting a number of recommendations for UA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Aalborg: Aalborg University, 2017. p. 25
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-147349 (URN)
Projects
ECIU Leadership program
Note

STRATEGIC PROJECT REPORT FOR UNIVERSITY OF AVEIRO (UA.

Available from: 2018-04-19 Created: 2018-04-19 Last updated: 2018-04-20Bibliographically approved
Glad, W. (2017). Time geography for planning a sustainable urban life. In: : . Paper presented at Chinese-Swedish Time Geography Workshop, College of Urban and Environmental Science, Peking University, May 17- 20 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Time geography for planning a sustainable urban life
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

My starting pioint is the importance of taking both culture and nature into account in planning and Hägerstrand's apporoach of geography as an inclusive discipline, coining concepts like all-ecology” or ”socio-technical ecology”.  Another starting point is time-space and pockets of local orders as our units of analysis and methodological approach: study of processes in their contexts. Hägerstrand writes about a game for co-existence, where co-existence is central in the time geography work. The game includes negotiations, adjustments and push outs, and competition for part of the time-space. A description of processes will show who are the players and what resources are used. Micro-level perspective are key and is a base for understanding bigger movements in society. Case study where Initially co-existence seemed impossible but in a long planning process proved co-existence possible. Conclusions show that urban planning must not be rushed. More sustainable solutions might appear with time. Nitty gritty perspectives make up our macro perspectives. Macro lense (photography) – large magnification of smal things – useful metaphore. 

Keywords
Urban planning, time geography, socio-technical ecology
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-137708 (URN)
Conference
Chinese-Swedish Time Geography Workshop, College of Urban and Environmental Science, Peking University, May 17- 20 2017
Projects
STINT: Chinese – Swedish co-production of research and education in urban planning with the Time-Geography approach
Funder
The Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research and Higher Education (STINT)
Available from: 2017-05-26 Created: 2017-05-26 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Glad, W. (2016). Mundane governance of domestic energy systems. In: : . Paper presented at 2016 Australian Summer Study on Energy Productivity. Sydney 24-26 February 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mundane governance of domestic energy systems
2016 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The proposed transition to a low-carbon society still faces major challenges. The speed of this transition is too slow to achieve the goals set by international and national governmental bodies, and gaps are often identified between available energy-productivity technologies and their appropriate use. The governance of mundane domains such as domestic energy systems has recently attracted attention from researchers in the European context (Shove et al. 2012, Woolgar and Neyland 2013). Lessons learnt from this research illustrate how materials, competence, and meaning influence energy productivity in domestic settings (Shove et al. 2012) and how accountability is enacted by connecting people and technologies (Woolgar and Neyland 2013). The research presented here cites Swedish examples of how energy productivity has been improved by involving multiple local actors, such as consumers, energy utilities, property companies, and local governments. The examples are analysed through the lens of social change and mundane governance theories, illustrating how spaces and places often overlooked as too mundane to be considered in policy prove, when analysed in more detail, to be important for energy productivity. The results indicate that “governance pairs” (Woolgar and Neyland 2013) are more or less successfully held together and influence accountability and governance possibilities. Examples of governance pairs are “households/lighting” and “caretakers/heating system”. These analyses demonstrate that, while governance is often portrayed in terms of causality, everyday practices involving various governance pairs are messier and less predictable than anticipated. These results call for the upgrading of research into everyday life and for bottom–up approaches in energy studies. Accountability – an important part of closing the energy-efficiency gap and understood in the context of mundane governance – can advance our energy-productivity thinking and action. 

National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125746 (URN)
Conference
2016 Australian Summer Study on Energy Productivity. Sydney 24-26 February 2016
Projects
ENVAR - Energieffektiva bostadshus – rum för vardagsliv
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2016-03-03 Created: 2016-03-03 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Glad, W. (2015). Housing renovation and energy systems: the need for social learning. In: Anshelm, J., Ellegård, K., Palm, J., Rohracher, H. (Ed.), Socio-technical perspectives on sustainable energy systems: (pp. 15-46). Linköping: Linköping University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Housing renovation and energy systems: the need for social learning
2015 (English)In: Socio-technical perspectives on sustainable energy systems / [ed] Anshelm, J., Ellegård, K., Palm, J., Rohracher, H., Linköping: Linköping University , 2015, p. 15-46Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Installing new energy systems in housing is claimed to be a way to meet national and international goals for reducedgreenhouse gas emissions. A socio-technical approach, based on social learning theory, is used to examine the energysystems of a large Swedish housing project ten years after its renovation. A significant retrofitting measure was theintroduction of metering. Important lessons are identified regarding the relationships between tenants, professionalsand technical systems. The inappropriate assumptions underpinning the renovation about inhabitants’ capabilitiesand demographics meant that the dwellings were not optimally refurbished to meet user requirements, particularlywith regard to the choice of technologies and inhabitants’ interface with them. Many of the installations are hiddenfrom tenants and difficult for inhabitants to discover, explore and use. Occupants did not use the technologies (smartmeters, thermostats, etc.) as intended, which lowered performance and also increased occupants’ dissatisfaction. Thiswas also evident in the high levels of support needed by the inhabitants. Social learning processes are vital for thesuccess of demand reduction strategies. Any demand reduction approach must consider people by investing in thesocial processes and the required learning for interfacing with technology, not merely the ‘smart’ technology itself.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University, 2015
Series
Linköping Studies in Technology and Social Change ; 2
Keywords
housing renovation, energy efficiency, socio-technical, learning, individual metering, smart technologies, Bostadsrenoveringar, miljöaspekter
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117403 (URN)9789175191041 (ISBN)
Projects
The co-production of sustainable energy futures? - socio-technical regimes and worlds in the use and management of energy systems in buildings
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2015-04-24 Created: 2015-04-24 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Glad, W. (2015). Stadsplanering i Linköping som ett ekologiskt spel. Geografiska Notiser, 73(1), 23-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stadsplanering i Linköping som ett ekologiskt spel
2015 (Swedish)In: Geografiska Notiser, ISSN 0016-724X, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 23-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113743 (URN)
Available from: 2015-01-29 Created: 2015-01-29 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Glad, W. (2015). The design of energy efficient everyday practices. In: Therese Laitinen Lindström, Daniel Mossberg, Michael Laitinen, Ylva Blume & Jason Erwin (Ed.), eceee 2015 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency: First fuel now. Paper presented at eceee 2015 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency (pp. 1611-1619). Stockholm: European Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ECEEE), 3
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The design of energy efficient everyday practices
2015 (English)In: eceee 2015 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency: First fuel now / [ed] Therese Laitinen Lindström, Daniel Mossberg, Michael Laitinen, Ylva Blume & Jason Erwin, Stockholm: European Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ECEEE), 2015, Vol. 3, p. 1611-1619Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Activity-centred design has been proposed as a way to encourage energy-efficient practices. This approach suggests that “good” designs can improve communication between the sender and receiver of a message, for example, “save energy”. The approach also concerns recent advances in research into how objects can be inscribed to steer users in certain directions. The approach has been expanded to include not only the use of individual things but the practices of everyday life. This paper examines design issues related to everyday practices and reports on findings in three household domains crucial to efforts to influence household behaviour to promote energy-efficient everyday lives: a bright and comfortable home (lighting, heating, and cooling), food and entertainment (storing food, cooking, Internet, and TV), and personal appearance (clothes washing and self-care). The findings are based on qualitative data from Swedish research in which three household domains were explored by visiting 32 homes and conducting 32 in-depth interviews. To complement the user perspective, observations and informal interviews with staff members of a public housing company were also included. Results indicate that conscious designs were seldom used to influence user practices; instead, general written information and regulations were more common tools for addressing users. Written information is not an efficient tool, and regulations are not perceived positively by households, which try to by-pass them. Current designs, instead of communicating energy efficiency, convey random messages unaligned with energy-efficiency objectives. This confuses users and makes it difficult for household members to take the “right” actions in everyday life. Recommendations to housing companies are to focus on both product and organizational designs to better target energy efficiency goals. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: European Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ECEEE), 2015
Series
eceee Summer Studies proceedings, ISSN 1653-7025, E-ISSN 2001-7960
Keywords
energy efficiency, housing, design, everyday life
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-119567 (URN)9789198048278 (ISBN)9789198048261 (ISBN)
Conference
eceee 2015 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency
Projects
ENVAR
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2015-06-22 Created: 2015-06-22 Last updated: 2018-07-04
Eriksson, J., Glad, W. & Johansson, M. (2015). User involvement in Swedish residential building projects: a stakeholder perspective. Journal of Housing and the Built Environment, 30(2), 313-329
Open this publication in new window or tab >>User involvement in Swedish residential building projects: a stakeholder perspective
2015 (English)In: Journal of Housing and the Built Environment, ISSN 1566-4910, E-ISSN 1573-7772, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 313-329Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

One factor influencing quality in the building industry is the ability of users, such as residents, to identify and express their requirements for the product, i.e. the residential building. However, the handling of communication with users in building projects has been insufficiently specified and studied. Drawing on a study of user involvement in building project design, production, and management, this paper examines user involvement in Swedish residential projects. To map current perceptions and approaches, building industry actors met in four focus groups. Group participants were asked to reflect on the definition of users, communication handling, how information from users is used, and challenges and opportunities in user involvement. Our initial emphasis was front-end activities, but focus group results revealed that user involvement was a continuous process extending from project initiation to evaluating the finished project as a basis for future projects. Discussions indicated confusion about who constituted users in various situations but, regardless of level of experience, focus group participants agreed on the importance and potential of user involvement and on the need for specific methods to acquire useful input.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2015
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109428 (URN)10.1007/s10901-014-9412-7 (DOI)000354404200008 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2014-08-18 Created: 2014-08-18 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Thollander, P., Glad, W. & Rohdin, P. (2014). Exploring Transactional Analysis in Relation to Post-Graduate Supervision—A Balancing Process. Creative Education, 5(4), 185-196
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring Transactional Analysis in Relation to Post-Graduate Supervision—A Balancing Process
2014 (English)In: Creative Education, ISSN 2151-4755, E-ISSN 2151-4771, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 185-196Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The PhD student supervision process is an important process, and the need for PhD students, who often form the backbone of the research community, to receive professional, inspiring and efficient supervision cannot be understated. This paper explores the benefits and values of Transactional Analysis (TA) as a way to further understand and work with PhD supervision. Using TA and the legitimacy ladder applied on PhD education, a modified model for increased understanding of the PhD student supervision process is presented, and is then related to empirical findings from a questionnaire among PhD students. The model shows for example the need for the supervisor to balance his or her role towards the PhD student, and suggests that professional PhD student supervision means moving from a Parent to Child relationship between the supervisor and the PhD student, towards a more mature Adult to Adult relationship.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Scientific Research Publishing, 2014
Keywords
PhD Student Supervision Process; Transactional Analysis; The Legitimacy Ladder; Supervision Model
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105434 (URN)10.4236/ce.2014.54028 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-03-21 Created: 2014-03-21 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
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