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Lantz, J., Gupta, V., Henriksson, L., Karlsson, M., Persson, A., Carlhäll, C.-J. & Ebbers, T. (2019). Impact of Pulmonary Venous Inflow on Cardiac Flow Simulations: Comparison with In Vivo 4D Flow MRI. Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 47(2), 413-424
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of Pulmonary Venous Inflow on Cardiac Flow Simulations: Comparison with In Vivo 4D Flow MRI
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2019 (English)In: Annals of Biomedical Engineering, ISSN 0090-6964, E-ISSN 1573-9686, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 413-424Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Blood flow simulations are making their way into the clinic, and much attention is given to estimation of fractional flow reserve in coronary arteries. Intracardiac blood flow simulations also show promising results, and here the flow field is expected to depend on the pulmonary venous (PV) flow rates. In the absence of in vivo measurements, the distribution of the flow from the individual PVs is often unknown and typically assumed. Here, we performed intracardiac blood flow simulations based on time-resolved computed tomography on three patients, and investigated the effect of the distribution of PV flow rate on the flow field in the left atrium and ventricle. A design-of-experiment approach was used, where PV flow rates were varied in a systematic manner. In total 20 different simulations were performed per patient, and compared to in vivo 4D flow MRI measurements. Results were quantified by kinetic energy, mitral valve velocity profiles and root-mean-square errors of velocity. While large differences in atrial flow were found for varying PV inflow distributions, the effect on ventricular flow was negligible, due to a regularizing effect by mitral valve. Equal flow rate through all PVs most closely resembled in vivo measurements and is recommended in the absence of a priori knowledge.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer-Verlag New York, 2019
Keywords
Sensitivity analysis, Design-of-experiments, Computational fluid dynamics, In vivo measurements
National Category
Medical Image Processing Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-153252 (URN)10.1007/s10439-018-02153-5 (DOI)000456383600007 ()30362080 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85055724908 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2018-12-06 Created: 2018-12-06 Last updated: 2019-03-22Bibliographically approved
Bustamante, M., Gupta, V., Forsberg, D., Carlhäll, C., Engvall, J. & Ebbers, T. (2018). Automated multi-atlas segmentation of cardiac 4D flow MRI. Medical Image Analysis, 49, 128-140
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Automated multi-atlas segmentation of cardiac 4D flow MRI
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2018 (English)In: Medical Image Analysis, ISSN 1361-8415, E-ISSN 1361-8423, Vol. 49, p. 128-140Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Four-dimensional (4D) flow magnetic resonance imaging (4D Flow MRI) enables acquisition of time-resolved three-directional velocity data in the entire heart and all major thoracic vessels. The segmentation of these tissues is typically performed using semi-automatic methods. Some of which primarily rely on the velocity data and result in a segmentation of the vessels only during the systolic phases. Other methods, mostly applied on the heart, rely on separately acquired balanced Steady State Free Precession (b-SSFP) MR images, after which the segmentations are superimposed on the 4D Flow MRI. While b-SSFP images typically cover the whole cardiac cycle and have good contrast, they suffer from a number of problems, such as large slice thickness, limited coverage of the cardiac anatomy, and being prone to displacement errors caused by respiratory motion. To address these limitations we propose a multi-atlas segmentation method, which relies only on 4D Flow MRI data, to automatically generate four-dimensional segmentations that include the entire thoracic cardiovascular system present in these datasets. The approach was evaluated on 4D Flow MR datasets from a cohort of 27 healthy volunteers and 83 patients with mildly impaired systolic left-ventricular function. Comparison of manual and automatic segmentations of the cardiac chambers at end-systolic and end-diastolic timeframes showed agreements comparable to those previously reported for automatic segmentation methods of b-SSFP MR images. Furthermore, automatic segmentation of the entire thoracic cardiovascular system improves visualization of 4D Flow MRI and facilitates computation of hemodynamic parameters.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
4D Flow MRI, Cardiac segmentation, Multi-atlas segmentation, Heart, Magnetic resonance imaging, Automatic segmentations, Directional velocities, Hemodynamic parameters, Left ventricular function, Segmentation methods, Semiautomatic methods, Steady state free precessions, Image segmentation, adult, anatomy, article, cohort analysis, controlled study, error, female, heart cycle, heart left ventricle function, human, human tissue, major clinical study, male, motion, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, steady state, thickness, volunteer
National Category
Medical Image Processing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150788 (URN)10.1016/j.media.2018.08.003 (DOI)000446286600011 ()30144652 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85051830661 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding details: 310612; Funding details: FP7, Seventh Framework Programme; Funding details: 621-2014-6191, VR, Vetenskapsrådet; Funding details: 223615; Funding details: 20140398; Funding text: This work was partially funded by the FP7-funded project DOPPLER-CIP [grant number 223615]; the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme ( FP7/2007-2013 ) [grant number 310612 ]; the Swedish Research Council [grant number 621-2014-6191 ]; and the Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation [grant number 20140398 ]. 

Available from: 2018-08-31 Created: 2018-08-31 Last updated: 2018-10-17Bibliographically approved
Gupta, V., Lantz, J., Henriksson, L., Engvall, J., Karlsson, M., Persson, A. & Ebbers, T. (2018). Automated three-dimensional tracking of the left ventricular myocardium in time-resolved and dose-modulated cardiac CT images using deformable image registration. Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, 12(2), 139-148
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Automated three-dimensional tracking of the left ventricular myocardium in time-resolved and dose-modulated cardiac CT images using deformable image registration
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, ISSN 1934-5925, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 139-148Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Assessment of myocardial deformation from time-resolved cardiac computed tomography (4D CT) would augment the already available functional information from such an examination without incurring any additional costs. A deformable image registration (DIR) based approach is proposed to allow fast and automatic myocardial tracking in clinical 4D CT images.

Methods Left ventricular myocardial tissue displacement through a cardiac cycle was tracked using a B-spline transformation based DIR. Gradient of such displacements allowed Lagrangian strain estimation with respect to end-diastole in clinical 4D CT data from ten subjects with suspected coronary artery disease. Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), point-to-curve error (PTC), and tracking error were used to assess the tracking accuracy. Wilcoxon signed rank test provided significance of tracking errors. Topology preservation was verified using Jacobian of the deformation. Reliability of estimated strains and torsion (normalized twist angle) was tested in subjects with normal function by comparing them with normal strain in the literature.

Results Comparison with manual tracking showed high accuracy (DSC: 0.99± 0.05; PTC: 0.56mm± 0.47 mm) and resulted in determinant(Jacobian) > 0 for all subjects, indicating preservation of topology. Average radial (0.13 mm), angular (0.64) and longitudinal (0.10 mm) tracking errors for the entire cohort were not significant (p > 0.9). For patients with normal function, average strain [circumferential, radial, longitudinal] and peak torsion estimates were: [-23.5%, 31.1%, −17.2%] and 7.22°, respectively. These estimates were in conformity with the reported normal ranges in the existing literature.

Conclusions Accurate wall deformation tracking and subsequent strain estimation are feasible with the proposed method using only routine time-resolved 3D cardiac CT.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Cardiac computed tomography; 4D CT; Image registration; Strain analysis; Myocardial deformation; Torsion
National Category
Medical Image Processing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-147433 (URN)10.1016/j.jcct.2018.01.005 (DOI)000428247900008 ()29402736 (PubMedID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2013.0076
Available from: 2018-05-17 Created: 2018-05-17 Last updated: 2019-04-30Bibliographically approved
Lantz, J., Gupta, V., Henriksson, L., Karlsson, M., Persson, A., Carlhäll, C. & Ebbers, T. (2018). Intracardiac Flow at 4D CT: Comparison with 4D Flow MRI. Radiology, 289(1), 51-58
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intracardiac Flow at 4D CT: Comparison with 4D Flow MRI
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2018 (English)In: Radiology, ISSN 0033-8419, E-ISSN 1527-1315, Vol. 289, no 1, p. 51-58Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

To investigate four-dimensional (4D) flow CT for the assessment of intracardiac blood flow patterns as compared with 4D flow MRI.

Materials and Methods

This prospective study acquired coronary CT angiography and 4D flow MRI data between February and December 2016 in a cohort of 12 participants (age range, 36–74 years; mean age, 57 years; seven men [age range, 36–74 years; mean age, 57 years] and five women [age range, 52–73 years; mean age, 64 years]). Flow simulations based solely on CT-derived cardiac anatomy were assessed together with 4D flow MRI measurements. Flow patterns, flow rates, stroke volume, kinetic energy, and flow components were quantified for both techniques and were compared by using linear regression.

Results

Cardiac flow patterns obtained by using 4D flow CT were qualitatively similar to 4D flow MRI measurements, as graded by three independent observers. The Cohen κ score was used to assess intraobserver variability (0.83, 0.79, and 0.70) and a paired Wilcoxon rank-sum test showed no significant change (P > .05) between gradings. Peak flow rate and stroke volumes between 4D flow MRI measurements and 4D flow CT measurements had high correlation (r = 0.98 and r = 0.81, respectively; P < .05 for both). Integrated kinetic energy quantified at peak systole correlated well (r = 0.95, P < .05), while kinetic energy levels at early and late filling showed no correlation. Flow component analysis showed high correlation for the direct and residual components, respectively (r = 0.93, P < .05 and r = 0.87, P < .05), while the retained and delayed components showed no correlation.

Conclusion

Four-dimensional flow CT produced qualitatively and quantitatively similar intracardiac blood flow patterns compared with the current reference standard, four-dimensional flow MRI.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oak Brook, IL United States: Radiological Society of North America, Inc., 2018
National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Medical Image Processing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149320 (URN)10.1148/radiol.2018173017 (DOI)000444990900009 ()29944089 (PubMedID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, Seeing Organ FunctionSwedish Heart Lung Foundation
Available from: 2018-06-28 Created: 2018-06-28 Last updated: 2019-04-12Bibliographically approved
Fredriksson, A. G., Trzebiatowska-Krzynska, A., Dyverfeldt, P., Engvall, J., Ebbers, T. & Carlhäll, C. (2018). Turbulent kinetic energy in the right ventricle: Potential MR marker for risk stratification of adults with repaired Tetralogy of Fallot. Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 47(4), 1043-1053
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Turbulent kinetic energy in the right ventricle: Potential MR marker for risk stratification of adults with repaired Tetralogy of Fallot
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 1043-1053Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To assess right ventricular (RV) turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) in patients with repaired Tetralogy of Fallot (rToF) and a spectrum of pulmonary regurgitation (PR), as well as to investigate the relationship between these 4D flow markers and RV remodeling.

Materials and Methods: Seventeen patients with rToF and 10 healthy controls were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups based on PR fraction: one lower PR fraction group (11%) and one higher PR fraction group (>11%). Field strength/sequences: 3D cine phase contrast (4D flow), 2D cine phase contrast (2D flow), and balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) at 1.5T. Assessment: The RV volume was segmented in the morphologic short-axis images and TKE parameters were computed inside the segmented RV volume throughout diastole. Statistical tests: One-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni post-hoc test; unpaired t-test; Pearson correlation coefficients; simple and stepwise multiple regression models; intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC).

Results: The higher PR fraction group had more remodeled RVs (140 6 25 vs. 107 6 22 [lower PR fraction, P < 0.01] and 93 6 15 ml/m2[healthy, P < 0.001] for RV end-diastolic volume index [RVEDVI]) and higher TKE values (5.95 6 3.15 vs. 2.23 6 0.81 [lower PR fraction, P < 0.01] and 1.91 6 0.78 mJ [healthy, P < 0.001] for Peak Total RV TKE). Multiple regression analysis between RVEDVI and 4D/2D flow parameters showed that Peak Total RV TKE was the strongest predictor of RVEDVI (R25 0.47, P 5 0.002).

Conclusion: The 4D flow-specific TKE markers showed a slightly stronger association with RV remodeling than conventional 2D flow PR parameters. These results suggest novel hemodynamic aspects of PR in the development of late complications after ToF repair.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
4D flow, MRI, Turbulence, Tetralogy of Fallot, Turbulent kinetic energy
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Medical Laboratory and Measurements Technologies Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medical Image Processing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143780 (URN)10.1002/jmri.25830 (DOI)000427125300016 ()28766919 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85026745981 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agencies:  European Research Council [310612]; Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation [20140398]; County Council of Ostergotland; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS); Swedish Research Council [2013-6077, 2014-6191]

Available from: 2017-12-18 Created: 2017-12-18 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Fredriksson, A. G., Svalbring, E., Eriksson, J., Dyverfeldt, P., Alehagen, U., Engvall, J., . . . Carlhäll, C.-J. (2016). 4D flow MRI can detect subtle right ventricular dysfunction in primary left ventricular disease.. Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 43(3), 558-565
Open this publication in new window or tab >>4D flow MRI can detect subtle right ventricular dysfunction in primary left ventricular disease.
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 558-565Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To investigate whether 4D flow magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect subtle right ventricular (RV) dysfunction in primary left ventricular (LV) disease.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: 4D flow and morphological 3T MRI data were acquired in 22 patients with mild ischemic heart disease who were stratified into two groups based on LV end-diastolic volume index (EDVI): lower-LVEDVI and higher-LVEDVI, as well as in 11 healthy controls. The RV volume was segmented at end-diastole (ED) and end-systole (ES). Pathlines were emitted from the ED volume and traced forwards and backwards in time to ES. The blood volume was separated into flow components. The Direct Flow (DF) component was defined as RV inflow passing directly to outflow. The kinetic energy (KE) of the DF component was calculated. Echocardiographic conventional RV indices were also assessed.

RESULTS: The higher-LVEDVI group had larger LVEDVI and lower LV ejection fraction (98 ± 32 ml/m(2) ; 48 ± 13%) compared to the healthy (67 ± 12, P = 0.002; 64 ± 7, P < 0.001) and lower-LVEDI groups (62 ± 10; 68 ± 7, both P < 0.001). The RV 4D flow-specific measures "DF/EDV volume-ratio" and "DF/EDV KE-ratio at ED" were lower in the higher-LVEDVI group (38 ± 5%; 52 ± 6%) compared to the healthy (44 ± 6; 65 ± 7, P = 0.018 and P < 0.001) and lower-LVEDVI groups (44 ± 6; 64 ± 7, P = 0.011 and P < 0.001). There was no difference in any of the conventional MRI and echocardiographic RV indices between the three groups.

CONCLUSION: We found that in primary LV disease mild impairment of RV function can be detected by 4D flow-specific measures, but not by the conventional MRI and echocardiographic indices. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2015.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
Keywords
4D flow MRI; interventricular interaction; left ventricular disease; right ventricular function
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124293 (URN)10.1002/jmri.25015 (DOI)000373000300003 ()26213253 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation; Swedish Research Council; European Union [223615]; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS); County Council of Ostergotland/Heart and Medicine Center

Available from: 2016-01-25 Created: 2016-01-25 Last updated: 2017-05-03
Casas Garcia, B., Lantz, J., Dyverfeldt, P. & Ebbers, T. (2016). 4D Flow MRI-Based Pressure Loss Estimation in Stenotic Flows: Evaluation Using Numerical Simulations. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 75(4), 1808-1821
Open this publication in new window or tab >>4D Flow MRI-Based Pressure Loss Estimation in Stenotic Flows: Evaluation Using Numerical Simulations
2016 (English)In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, ISSN 0740-3194, E-ISSN 1522-2594, Vol. 75, no 4, p. 1808-1821Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To assess how 4D flow MRI-based pressure and energy loss estimates correspond to net transstenotic pressure gradients (TPG(net)) and their dependence on spatial resolution. Methods: Numerical velocity data of stenotic flow were obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations in geometries with varying stenosis degrees, poststenotic diameters and flow rates. MRI measurements were simulated at different spatial resolutions. The simplified and extended Bernoulli equations, Pressure-Poisson equation (PPE), and integration of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and viscous dissipation were compared against the true TPG(net). Results: The simplified Bernoulli equation overestimated the true TPG(net) (8.74 +/- 0.67 versus 6.76 +/- 0.54 mmHg). The extended Bernoulli equation performed better (6.57 +/- 0.53 mmHg), although errors remained at low TPG(net). TPG(net) estimations using the PPE were always close to zero. Total TKE and viscous dissipation correlated strongly with TPG(net) for each geometry (r(2) &gt; 0.93) and moderately considering all geometries (r(2) = 0.756 and r(2) = 0.776, respectively). TKE estimates were accurate and minorly impacted by resolution. Viscous dissipation was overall underestimated and resolution dependent. Conclusion: Several parameters overestimate or are not linearly related to TPG(net) and/or depend on spatial resolution. Considering idealized axisymmetric geometries and in absence of noise, TPG(net) was best estimated using the extended Bernoulli equation. (C) 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2016
Keywords
pressure loss; phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging; aortic valve disease; aortic coarctation
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127426 (URN)10.1002/mrm.25772 (DOI)000372910900043 ()26016805 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|European Research Council [310612]; Swedish Research Council

Available from: 2016-05-01 Created: 2016-04-26 Last updated: 2018-10-10
Lantz, J., Henriksson, L., Persson, A., Karlsson, M. & Ebbers, T. (2016). Importance Of Including Papillary Muscles And Trabeculae In Cardiac Flow Simulations. In: Proceedings of the 2016 Summer Biomechanics, Bioengineering and Biotransport Conference: . Paper presented at SB3C 2016 - Summer Biomechanics, Bioengineering and Biotransport Conference, National Harbor, MD, USA, June 29 – July 2, 2016. Organizing Committee for the 2016 Summer Biomechanics, Bioengineering and Biotransport
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Importance Of Including Papillary Muscles And Trabeculae In Cardiac Flow Simulations
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2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2016 Summer Biomechanics, Bioengineering and Biotransport Conference, Organizing Committee for the 2016 Summer Biomechanics, Bioengineering and Biotransport , 2016Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Organizing Committee for the 2016 Summer Biomechanics, Bioengineering and Biotransport, 2016
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Applied Mechanics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-131097 (URN)978-0-692-71816-2 (ISBN)
Conference
SB3C 2016 - Summer Biomechanics, Bioengineering and Biotransport Conference, National Harbor, MD, USA, June 29 – July 2, 2016
Available from: 2016-09-08 Created: 2016-09-08 Last updated: 2016-09-14Bibliographically approved
Andersson, C., Kihlberg, J., Ebbers, T., Lindström, L., Carlhäll, C. & Engvall, J. (2016). Phase-contrast MRI volume flow - a comparison of breath held and navigator based acquisitions. BMC Medical Imaging, 16(26)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phase-contrast MRI volume flow - a comparison of breath held and navigator based acquisitions
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2016 (English)In: BMC Medical Imaging, ISSN 1471-2342, E-ISSN 1471-2342, Vol. 16, no 26Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) 2D phase-contrast flow measurement has been regarded as the gold standard in blood flow measurements and can be performed with free breathing or breath held techniques. We hypothesized that the accuracy of flow measurements obtained with segmented phase-contrast during breath holding, and in particular higher number of k-space segments, would be non-inferior compared to navigator phase-contrast. Volumes obtained from anatomic segmentation of cine MRI and Doppler echocardiography were used for additional reference. Methods: Forty patients, five women and 35 men, mean age 65 years (range 53-80), were randomly selected and consented to the study. All underwent EKG-gated cardiac MRI including breath hold cine, navigator based free-breathing phase-contrast MRI and breath hold phase-contrast MRI using k-space segmentation factors 3 and 5, as well as transthoracic echocardiography within 2 days. Results: In navigator based free-breathing phase-contrast flow, mean stroke volume and cardiac output were 79.7 +/- 17.1 ml and 5071 +/- 1192 ml/min, respectively. The duration of the acquisition was 50 +/- 6 s. With k-space segmentation factor 3, the corresponding values were 77.7 ml +/- 17.5 ml and 4979 +/- 1211 ml/min (p = 0.15 vs navigator). The duration of the breath hold was 17 +/- 2 s. K-space segmentation factor 5 gave mean stroke volume 77.9 +/- 16.4 ml, cardiac output 5142 +/- 1197 ml/min (p = 0.33 vs navigator), and breath hold time 11 +/- 1 s. Anatomical segmentation of cine gave mean stroke volume and cardiac output 91.2 +/- 20.8 ml and 5963 +/- 1452 ml/min, respectively. Echocardiography was reliable in 20 of the 40 patients. The mean diameter of the left ventricular outflow tract was 20.7 +/- 1.5 mm, stroke volume 78.3 ml +/- 15.2 ml and cardiac output 5164 +/- 1249 ml/min. Conclusions: In forty consecutive patients with coronary heart disease, breath holding and segmented k-space sampling techniques for phase-contrast flow produced stroke volumes and cardiac outputs similar to those obtained with free-breathing navigator based phase-contrast MRI, using less time. The values obtained agreed fairly well with Doppler echocardiography while there was a larger difference when compared with anatomical volume determinations using SSFP (steady state free precession) cine MRI.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2016
Keywords
Phase-contrast flow; Magnetic resonance imaging; Segmentation; 2D Doppler echocardiography
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127432 (URN)10.1186/s12880-016-0128-x (DOI)000372901200001 ()27021353 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation [20120449, 20140398]; Region of Ostergotland [281281]; European Union FP 7 [223615]; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden [88731, 157921]

Available from: 2016-05-01 Created: 2016-04-26 Last updated: 2018-03-20Bibliographically approved
Petersson, S., Dyverfeldt, P., Sigfridsson, A., Lantz, J., Carlhäll, C. & Ebbers, T. (2016). Quantification of turbulence and velocity in stenotic flow using spiral three-dimensional phase-contrast MRI. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 75(3), 1249-1255
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quantification of turbulence and velocity in stenotic flow using spiral three-dimensional phase-contrast MRI
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2016 (English)In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, ISSN 0740-3194, E-ISSN 1522-2594, Vol. 75, no 3, p. 1249-1255Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PurposeEvaluate spiral three-dimensional (3D) phase contrast MRI for the assessment of turbulence and velocity in stenotic flow. MethodsA-stack-of-spirals 3D phase contrast MRI sequence was evaluated in vitro against a conventional Cartesian sequence. Measurements were made in a flow phantom with a 75% stenosis. Both spiral and Cartesian imaging were performed using different scan orientations and flow rates. Volume flow rate, maximum velocity and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) were computed for both methods. Moreover, the estimated TKE was compared with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) data. ResultsThere was good agreement between the turbulent kinetic energy from the spiral, Cartesian and CFD data. Flow rate and maximum velocity from the spiral data agreed well with Cartesian data. As expected, the short echo time of the spiral sequence resulted in less prominent displacement artifacts compared with the Cartesian sequence. However, both spiral and Cartesian flow rate estimates were sensitive to displacement when the flow was oblique to the encoding directions. ConclusionSpiral 3D phase contrast MRI appears favorable for the assessment of stenotic flow. The spiral sequence was more than three times faster and less sensitive to displacement artifacts when compared with a conventional Cartesian sequence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2016
Keywords
phase contrast mri; 4d flow; turbulence mapping; spiral; stenosis
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126831 (URN)10.1002/mrm.25698 (DOI)000370593700030 ()25846511 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|European Research Council [310612]; Swedish Research Council; Swedish e-Science Research Centre

Available from: 2016-04-07 Created: 2016-04-05 Last updated: 2017-05-03
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1395-8296

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