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Eintrei, Christina
Publications (10 of 34) Show all publications
Andersson, H., Björnström-Karlsson, K., Eintrei, C. & Sundqvist, T. (2015). Orexin A Phosphorylates the gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Type A Receptor beta(2) Subunit on a Serine Residue and Changes the Surface Expression of the Receptor in SH-SY5Y Cells Exposed to Propofol. Journal of Neuroscience Research, 93(11), 1748-1755
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Orexin A Phosphorylates the gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Type A Receptor beta(2) Subunit on a Serine Residue and Changes the Surface Expression of the Receptor in SH-SY5Y Cells Exposed to Propofol
2015 (English)In: Journal of Neuroscience Research, ISSN 0360-4012, E-ISSN 1097-4547, Vol. 93, no 11, p. 1748-1755Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Propofol activates the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)R) and causes a reversible neurite retraction, leaving a thin, thread-like structure behind; it also reverses the transport of vesicles in rat cortical neurons. The awakening peptide orexin A (OA) inhibits this retraction via phospholipase D (PLD) and protein kinase CE (PKCE). The human SH-SY5Y cells express both GABA(A)Rs and orexin 1 and 2 receptors. These cells are used to examine the interaction between OA and the GABAAR. The effects of OA are studied with flow cytometry and immunoblotting. This study shows that OA stimulates phosphorylation on the serine residues of the GABA(A)R beta(2) subunit and that the phosphorylation is caused by the activation of PLD and PKCE. OA administration followed by propofol reduces the cell surface expression of the GABA(A)R, whereas propofol stimulation before OA increases the surface expression. The GABA(A)R beta(2) subunit is important for receptor recirculation, and the effect of OA on propofol-stimulated cells may be due to a disturbed recirculation of the GABA(A)R. (C) 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2015
Keywords
orexin; propofol; GABAAR; cell signaling; AB_10675844; AB_1269637; AB_10712311; AB_2247467; AB_307187; AB_307184; AB_1566589
National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122517 (URN)10.1002/jnr.23631 (DOI)000362831800013 ()26283475 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland ALF Grants; Linkoping University Hospital; Ella and Henry Stahl Research Foundation

Available from: 2015-11-09 Created: 2015-11-06 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Björnström-Karlsson, K., Turina, D., Strid, T., Sundqvist, T. & Eintrei, C. (2014). Orexin A Inhibits Propofol-Induced Neurite Retraction by a Phospholipase D/Protein Kinase C-epsilon-Dependent Mechanism in Neurons. PLoS ONE, 9(5), e0097129
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Orexin A Inhibits Propofol-Induced Neurite Retraction by a Phospholipase D/Protein Kinase C-epsilon-Dependent Mechanism in Neurons
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2014 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 5, p. e0097129-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The intravenous anaesthetic propofol retracts neurites and reverses the transport of vesicles in rat cortical neurons. Orexin A (OA) is an endogenous neuropeptide regulating wakefulness and may counterbalance anaesthesia. We aim to investigate if OA interacts with anaesthetics by inhibition of the propofol-induced neurite retraction. Methods: In primary cortical cell cultures from newborn rats brains, live cell light microscopy was used to measure neurite retraction after propofol (2 mu M) treatment with or without OA (10 nM) application. The intracellular signalling involved was tested using a protein kinase C (PKC) activator [phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)] and inhibitors of Rho-kinase (HA-1077), phospholipase D (PLD) [5-fluoro-2-indolyl des-chlorohalopemide (FIPI)], PKC (staurosporine), and a PKC epsilon translocation inhibitor peptide. Changes in PKC epsilon Ser(729) phosphorylation were detected with Western blot. Results: The neurite retraction induced by propofol is blocked by Rho-kinase and PMA. OA blocks neurite retraction induced by propofol, and this inhibitory effect could be prevented by FIPI, staurosporine and PKC epsilon translocation inhibitor peptide. OA increases via PLD and propofol decreases PKC epsilon Ser(729) phosphorylation, a crucial step in the activation of PKC epsilon. Conclusions: Rho-kinase is essential for propofol-induced neurite retraction in cortical neuronal cells. Activation of PKC inhibits neurite retraction caused by propofol. OA blocks propofol-induced neurite retraction by a PLD/PKC epsilon-mediated pathway, and PKC epsilon maybe the key enzyme where the wakefulness and anaesthesia signal pathways converge.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2014
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-108807 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0097129 (DOI)000336857400058 ()
Available from: 2014-07-07 Created: 2014-07-06 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Suleman Khan, M., Zetterlund, E.-L., Green, H., Oscarsson, A., Zackrisson, A.-L., Svanborg, E., . . . Eintrei, C. (2014). Pharmacogenetics, Plasma Concentrations, Clinical Signs and EEG During Propofol Treatment. Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology, 115(6), 565-570
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pharmacogenetics, Plasma Concentrations, Clinical Signs and EEG During Propofol Treatment
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2014 (English)In: Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology, ISSN 1742-7835, E-ISSN 1742-7843, Vol. 115, no 6, p. 565-570Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A variety of techniques have been developed to monitor the depth of anaesthesia. Propofols pharmacokinetics and response vary greatly, which might be explained by genetic polymorphisms. We investigated the impact of genetic variations on dosage, anaesthetic depth and recovery after total intravenous anaesthesia with propofol. A total of 101 patients were enrolled in the study. The plasma concentration of propofol during anaesthesia was measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. EEG was monitored during the surgical procedure as a measure of anaesthetic depth. Pyrosequencing was used to determine genetic polymorphisms in CYP2B6, CYP2C9, the UGTIA9-promotor and the GABRE gene. The correlation between genotype and to plasma concentration at the time of loss of consciousness (LOC), the total induction dose, the time to anaesthesia, eye opening and clearance were investigated. EEG monitoring showed that the majority of the patients had not reached a sufficient level of anaesthetic depth (subdelta) at the time of loss of consciousness despite a high induction dose of propofol. Patients with UGT1A9-331C/T had a higher propofol clearance than those without (p=0.03) and required a higher induction dose (p=0.03). The patients with UGT1A9-1818T/C required a longer time to LOC (p=0.03). The patients with CYP2C9*2 had a higher concentration of propofol at the time of LOC (p=0.02). The polymorphisms in the metabolizing enzymes and the receptor could not explain the large variation seen in the pharmacokinetics of propofol and the clinical response seen. At LOC, the patients showed a large difference in EEG pattern.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2014
National Category
Clinical Medicine Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112995 (URN)10.1111/bcpt.12277 (DOI)000345341900013 ()24891132 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden; Swedish Cancer Society; Swedish Research Council; County Council in Ostergotland

Available from: 2015-01-12 Created: 2015-01-08 Last updated: 2019-02-11
Oscarsson, A., Oster, S., Fredrikson, M., Lindahl, T. & Eintrei, C. (2011). Platelet function assessed by whole-blood aggregometry in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF ANAESTHESIOLOGY, 28(5), 363-369
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Platelet function assessed by whole-blood aggregometry in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery
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2011 (English)In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF ANAESTHESIOLOGY, ISSN 0265-0215, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 363-369Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background The risk/benefit of continuing low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) for secondary prevention in the perioperative period is still debated. The primary aim of this study was to determine the effect of acetylsalicylic acid compared with placebo on platelet function in the perioperative period. Methods This is a subgroup analysis of a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled multicentre study. High-risk patients undergoing major non-cardiac surgery were randomised to 75 mg acetylsalicylic acid or placebo 7 days preoperatively, until the third postoperative day. In 36 patients, platelet function in response to arachidonic acid was assessed by whole-blood impedance aggregometry using a multiplate analyser 1 h before surgery, directly after surgery and 48 h postoperatively. Results The platelet function was significantly reduced in patients treated with acetylsalicylic acid compared with placebo in the preoperative period [200 aggregation units (AU) min (interquartile range [IQR] 133-261 AU min(-1)) vs. 860 AU min (IQR 800-1010 AU min), P andlt; 0.001] as well as postoperatively [198 AU min (IQR 138-270 AU min) vs. 605 AU min (IQR 434-836 AU min), Pandlt;0.001]. The platelet response was significantly reduced postoperatively compared with preoperatively in patients receiving placebo [860 AU min (IQR 800-1010 AU min) vs. 605 AU min (IQR 434-861 AU min), P=0.0009]. No significant differences were found between pre- and postoperative platelet function in patients on acetylsalicylic acid [200 AU min (IQR 133-261 AU min) vs. 198 AU min (133-270 AU min), P=0.21]. Conclusion Multiplate whole-blood impedance aggregometry demonstrates acetylsalicylic affect in preoperative as well as postoperative samples derived from patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2011
Keywords
acetylsalicylic acid, aggregometry, non-cardiac, platelet function, surgery
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-67835 (URN)10.1097/EJA.0b013e32834448ed (DOI)000289459200012 ()
Available from: 2011-04-29 Created: 2011-04-29 Last updated: 2012-03-20
Turina, D., Björnström-Karlsson, K., Sundqvist, T. & Eintrei, C. (2011). Propofol alters vesicular transport in rat cortical neuronalcultures. Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, 62(1), 119-124
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Propofol alters vesicular transport in rat cortical neuronalcultures
2011 (English)In: Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, ISSN 0867-5910, E-ISSN 1899-1505, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 119-124Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Neuronal intracellular transport is performed by motor proteins, which deliver vesicles, organelles and proteins along cytoskeletal tracks inside the neuron. We have previously shown that the anesthetic propofol causes dose- and time-dependent, reversible retraction of neuronal neurites. We hypothesize that propofol alters the vesicular transport of cortical neurons due to this neurite retraction. Primary cultures of co-cultivated rat cortical neurons and glial cells were exposed to either 2 mu M propofol, control medium or the lipid vehicle, in time-response experiments. Reversibility was tested by washing propofol off the cells. The role of the GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R) was assessed with the GABA(A)R antagonist gabazine. Vesicles were tracked using differential interference contrast video microscopy. Propofol caused a retrograde movement in 83.4 +/- 5.2% (mean +/- S.E.M.) of vesicles, which accelerated over the observed time course (0.025 +/- 0.012 mu m.s(-1)). In control medium, vesicles moved predominantly anterograde (84.6 +/- 11.1%) with lower velocity (0.011 +/- 0.004 mu m.s(-1)). Cells exposed to the lipid vehicle showed the same dynamic characteristics as cells in control medium. The propofol-induced effect on vesicle transport was reversible and blocked by the GABA(A)R antagonist gabazine in low concentration. Our results show that propofol causes a reversible, accelerating vesicle movement toward the neuronal cell body that is mediated via synaptic GABA(A)R. We have previously reported that propofol initiates neurite retraction, and we propose that propofol causes vesicle movement by retrograde flow of cytoplasm from the narrowed neurite.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Polish Physiological Society, 2011
Keywords
anesthetics intravenously, brain, cellular mechanism, cerebral cortex, neurotransmission effects, pharmacology, propofol, theories of anesthetic action, vesicular transport
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-67967 (URN)000289542300014 ()
Available from: 2011-05-04 Created: 2011-05-04 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Gupta, A., Bjornsson, A., Fredriksson, M., Hallböök, O. & Eintrei, C. (2011). Reduction in mortality after epidural anaesthesia and analgesia in patients undergoing rectal but not colonic cancer surgery: a retrospective analysis of data from 655 patients in Central Sweden. British Journal of Anaesthesia, 107(2), 164-170
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reduction in mortality after epidural anaesthesia and analgesia in patients undergoing rectal but not colonic cancer surgery: a retrospective analysis of data from 655 patients in Central Sweden
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2011 (English)In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 107, no 2, p. 164-170Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. There is some evidence that epidural analgesia (EDA) reduces tumour recurrence after breast and prostatic cancer surgery. We assessed whether EDA reduces long-term mortality after colorectal cancer surgery. Methods. All patients having colorectal cancer surgery between January 2004 and January 2008 at Linkoping and Orebro were included. Exclusion criteria were: emergency operations, laparoscopic-assisted colorectal resection, and stage 4 cancer. Statistical information was obtained from the Swedish National Register for Deaths. Patients were analysed in two groups: EDA group or patient-controlled analgesia (PCA group) as the primary method of analgesia. Results. A total of 655 patients could be included. All-cause mortality for colorectal cancer (stages 1-3) was 22.7% (colon: 20%, rectal: 26%) after 1-5 yr of surgery. Multivariate regression analysis identified the following statistically significant factors for death after colon cancer (Pless than0.05): age (greater than72 yr) and cancer stage 3 (compared with stage 1). A similar model for rectal cancer found that age (greater than72 yr) and the use of PCA rather than EDA and cancer stages 2 and 3 (compared with stage 1) were associated with a higher risk for death. No significant risk of death was found for colon cancer when comparing EDA with PCA (P=0.23), but a significantly increased risk of death was seen after rectal cancer when PCA was used compared with EDA (P=0.049) [hazards ratio: 0.52 (0.27-1.00)]. Conclusions. We found a reduction in all-cause mortality after rectal but not colon cancer in patients having EDA compared with PCA technique.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2011
Keywords
analgesia, epidural, patient controlled; complications, death; surgery, colorectal
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-69786 (URN)10.1093/bja/aer100 (DOI)000292779000008 ()
Available from: 2011-08-10 Created: 2011-08-08 Last updated: 2017-12-08
Oscarsson Tibblin, A., Gupta, A., Fredrikson, M., Järhult, J., Nyström, M., Pettersson, E., . . . Eintrei, C. (2010). To continue or discontinue aspirin in the perioperative period: a randomized, controlled clinical trial. British Journal of Anaesthesia, 104(3), 305-312
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To continue or discontinue aspirin in the perioperative period: a randomized, controlled clinical trial
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2010 (English)In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 104, no 3, p. 305-312Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) are a common cause of deathafter non-cardiac surgery. Despite evidence for the benefitof aspirin for secondary prevention, it is often discontinuedin the perioperative period due to the risk of bleeding.

Methods: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlledtrial in order to compare the effect of low-dose aspirin withthat of placebo on myocardial damage, cardiovascular, and bleedingcomplications in high-risk patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery.Aspirin (75 mg) or placebo was given 7 days before surgery andcontinued until the third postoperative day. Patients were followedup for 30 days after surgery.

Results: A total of 220 patients were enrolled, 109 patients receivedaspirin and 111 received placebo. Four patients (3.7%) in theaspirin group and 10 patients (9.0%) in the placebo group hadelevated troponin T levels in the postoperative period (P=0.10).Twelve patients (5.4%) had an MACE during the first 30 postoperativedays. Two of these patients (1.8%) were in the aspirin groupand 10 patients (9.0%) were in the placebo group (P=0.02). Treatmentwith aspirin resulted in a 7.2% absolute risk reduction [95%confidence interval (CI), 1.3–13%] for postoperative MACE.The relative risk reduction was 80% (95% CI, 9.2–95%).Numbers needed to treat were 14 (95% CI, 7.6–78). No significantdifferences in bleeding complications were seen between thetwo groups.

Conclusions: In high-risk patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery, perioperativeaspirin reduced the risk of MACE without increasing bleedingcomplications. However, the study was not powered to evaluatebleeding complications.

 

Keywords
analgesics non-opioid, aspirin; complications, haemorrhage; heart, ischaemia; surgery, non-cardiac
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-20759 (URN)10.1093/bja/aeq003 (DOI)000274485900006 ()
Note
This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in British Journal of Anaesthesia following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version: Anna Oscarsson Tibblin, Anil Gupta, Mats Fredrikson, Johannes Järhult, Matti Nyström, Eva Pettersson, Bijan Darvish, Helena Krook, Eva Swahn and Christina Eintrei, To continue or discontinue aspirin in the perioperative period: a randomized, controlled clinical trial, 2010, British Journal of Anaesthesia, (104), 3, 305-312. is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/bja/aeq003 Copyright: Oxford University Press http://www.oxfordjournals.org/ Available from: 2009-09-18 Created: 2009-09-18 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Oscarsson Tibblin, A., Fredrikson, M., Sorliden, M., Anskär, S. & Eintrei, C. (2009). N-terminal fragment of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide is a predictor of cardiac events in high-risk patients undergoing acute hip fracture surgery. British Journal of Anaesthesia, 103(2), 206-212
Open this publication in new window or tab >>N-terminal fragment of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide is a predictor of cardiac events in high-risk patients undergoing acute hip fracture surgery
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2009 (English)In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, ISSN 0007-0912, Vol. 103, no 2, p. 206-212Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this investigation was to assess the incidence of elevated N-terminal fragment of pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and its relation to outcome defined as perioperative adverse cardiac events and all-cause mortality in high-risk patients undergoing non-elective surgery for hip fracture. A cohort of patients with hip fractures were extracted from a prospective observational study of high-risk patients (ASA class III or IV) undergoing emergency surgery. NT-proBNP and troponin I were measured before operation. An NT-proBNP greater than= 3984 ng litre(-1) was set as the cut-off level for significance. Perioperative adverse cardiac events and 30 day and 3 month mortality were recorded. Sixty-nine subjects were included. Thirty-four subjects (49%) had an NT-proBNP greater than= 3984 ng litre(-1) before surgery. Thirty-four subjects (49%) had a perioperative adverse cardiac event. Of these, 22 subjects (65%) had NT-proBNP above the diagnostic threshold compared with 12 subjects (34%) who had an NT-proBNP below the diagnostic threshold (P=0.01). Preoperative NT-proBNP greater than= 3984 ng litre(-1) [odds ratio (OR) 3.0; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-8.9] and congestive heart failure (OR 3.0; 95% CI 1.0-9.0) were independent predictors of perioperative adverse cardiac events. A total of eight subjects (12%) died within 30 days after operation. There is a high incidence of elevated NT-proBNP in subjects undergoing non-elective hip fracture surgery. Preoperative NT-proBNP is a valuable predictor of cardiac complications in the perioperative period.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2009
Keywords
complications; morbidity; heart; myocardial function; surgery; non-cardiac; surgery; orthopaedic
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-20147 (URN)10.1093/bja/aep139 (DOI)000268107800009 ()19525507 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-09-01 Created: 2009-08-31 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Oscarsson Tibblin, A., Fredrikson, M., Sorliden, M., Anskär, S., Gupta, A., Swahn, E. & Eintrei, C. (2009). Predictors of cardiac events in high-risk patients undergoing emergency surgery. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, 53(8), 986-994
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictors of cardiac events in high-risk patients undergoing emergency surgery
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2009 (English)In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 986-994Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of myocardial damage and left ventricular myocardial dysfunction and their influence on outcome in high-risk patients undergoing non-elective surgery.

Methods: In this prospective observational study, 211 patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists classification III or IV undergoing emergent or urgent surgery were included. Troponin I (TnI) was measured pre-operatively, 12 and 48 h post-operatively. Pre-operative N-terminal fragment of B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), as a marker for left ventricular systolic dysfunction, was analyzed. The diagnostic thresholds were set to TnI andgt; 0.06 mu g/l and NT-proBNP andgt; 1800 pg/ml, respectively. Post-operative major adverse cardiac events (MACE), 30-day and 3-months mortality were recorded.

Results: Elevated TnI levels were detected in 33% of the patients post-operatively. A TnI elevation increased the risk of MACE (35% vs. 3% in patients with normal TnI levels, P andlt; 0.001) and 30-day mortality (23% vs. 7%, P=0.003). Increased concentrations of NT-proBNP were seen in 59% of the patients. Elevated NT-proBNP was an independent predictor of myocardial damage post-operatively, odds ratio, 6.2 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1-18.0] and resulted in an increased risk of MACE (21% vs. 2.5% in patients with NT-proBNP andlt; 1800 pg/ml, P andlt; 0.001).

Conclusion: Myocardial damage is common in a high-risk population undergoing unscheduled surgery. These results suggest a close correlation between myocardial damage in the post-operative period and increased concentration of NT-proBNP before surgery. The combinations of TnI and NT-proBNP are reliable markers for monitoring patients at risk in the peri-operative period as well as useful tools in our risk assessment pre-operatively in emergency surgery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2009
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-20010 (URN)10.1111/j.1399-6576.2009.01971.x (DOI)000268789300002 ()19388892 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-08-24 Created: 2009-08-24 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Lindfors, S., Eintrei, C. & Alexanderson, K. (2009). Stress factors affecting academic physicians at a university hospital.. Work (Reading, Mass.), 34(3), 305-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stress factors affecting academic physicians at a university hospital.
2009 (English)In: Work (Reading, Mass.), ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 305-13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research is limited regarding occupational stress in academic physicians; professionals whose work situation includes the three areas of clinical practice, research, and teaching. The aim of this study was to gain knowledge of factors experienced as stressful by academic physicians employed by a university hospital. A questionnaire assessing the frequency and intensity of 36 potentially stressful factors was sent to all 157 academic physicians who were employed at the Linköping University Hospital, Sweden. The response rate was 77%. Both a high frequency and intensity of stress was experienced by 66% of the academic physicians in relation to "time pressure" and by almost 50% in connection with both "find time for research" and having "conflict of interest between different work assignments". Moreover, physicians in the higher age group and those who had attained a higher academic position experienced less stress. The female participants experienced more stress than the males due to gender-related problems and to variables associated with relationships at work. More knowledge is needed to determine the consequences of this finding and to identify coping strategies used for handling such stress.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-53070 (URN)10.3233/WOR-2009-0928 (DOI)000273753600007 ()20037245 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-01-15 Created: 2010-01-15 Last updated: 2010-02-05
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