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Oldaeus, Göran
Publications (4 of 4) Show all publications
Abrahamsson, T. R., Jakobsson, T., Böttcher, M. F., Fredrikson, M., Jenmalm, M. C., Björkstén, B. & Oldaeus, G. (2007). Probiotics in prevention of IgE-associated eczema: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 119(5), 1174-1180
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Probiotics in prevention of IgE-associated eczema: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial
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2007 (English)In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 119, no 5, p. 1174-1180Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: An altered microbial exposure may underlie the increase of allergic diseases in affluent societies. Probiotics may alleviate and even prevent eczema in infants.

OBJECTIVE: To prevent eczema and sensitization in infants with a family history of allergic disease by oral supplementation with the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri.

METHODS: Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, which comprised 232 families with allergic disease, of whom 188 completed the study. The mothers received L reuteri ATCC 55730 (1 x 10(8) colony forming units) daily from gestational week 36 until delivery. Their babies then continued with the same product from birth until 12 months of age and were followed up for another year. Primary outcome was allergic disease, with or without positive skin prick test or circulating IgE to food allergens.

RESULTS: The cumulative incidence of eczema was similar, 36% in the treated versus 34% in the placebo group. The L reuteri group had less IgE-associated eczema during the second year, 8% versus 20% (P = .02), however. Skin prick test reactivity was also less common in the treated than in the placebo group, significantly so for infants with mothers with allergies, 14% versus 31% (P = .02). Wheeze and other potentially allergic diseases were not affected.

CONCLUSION: Although a preventive effect of probiotics on infant eczema was not confirmed, the treated infants had less IgE-associated eczema at 2 years of age and therefore possibly run a reduced risk to develop later respiratory allergic disease. CLINICAL IMPLICATION: Probiotics may reduce the incidence of IgE-associated eczema in infancy.

Keywords
Children, eczema, IgE, Lactobacillus, prevention, probiotics, sensitization, skin prick test
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-20580 (URN)10.1016/j.jaci.2007.01.007 (DOI)17349686 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-09-15 Created: 2009-09-15 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Devenney, I., Norrman, G., Oldaeus, G., Strömberg, L. & Fälth-Magnusson, K. (2006). A new model for low-dose food challenge in children with allergy to milk and egg. Acta Paediatrica, 95(9), 1133-1139
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A new model for low-dose food challenge in children with allergy to milk and egg
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2006 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, Vol. 95, no 9, p. 1133-1139Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Atopic eczema and food allergy are common in early childhood. Children seem to gradually develop tolerance to milk and egg, and it is a relief for families when their child can tolerate small amounts of these basic foods, even if larger doses may still cause symptoms. Aim: To develop a model for low-dose oral food challenge, facilitating re-/introduction of milk or egg. Methods: In 39 children sensitized to milk and/or egg, we performed 52 challenges using a new standardized model for low-dose oral food challenge. The recipes were validated for blinding with sensorial tests. Results: Four children challenged to milk had a positive challenge outcome. There were no significant differences with respect to family history, associated atopic manifestations, nutritional supply, eczema severity, or skin-prick test compared with the non-reacting children, but total and specific IgE values were significantly higher. All but two of the non-reacting children were able to introduce milk and egg into their diet without problems.

Conclusion: We report recipes and a protocol to be used for standardized open and double-blind placebo-controlled low-dose food challenge in young children, enabling the introduction of small amounts of egg and milk into the diet during tolerance development.

Keywords
Atopic eczema; double-blind; food allergy; food challenge; skin-prick test
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14561 (URN)10.1080/08035250500516672 (DOI)
Available from: 2007-06-19 Created: 2007-06-19 Last updated: 2009-03-30
Norrman, G., Tomičić, S., Fagerås Böttcher, M., Oldaeus, G., Strömberg, L. & Fälth-Magnusson, K. (2005). Significant improvement of eczema with skin care and food elimination in small children. Acta Paediatrica, 94(10), 1384-1388
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Significant improvement of eczema with skin care and food elimination in small children
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2005 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, Vol. 94, no 10, p. 1384-1388Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To evaluate common methods of investigation and treatment in children younger than 2 y of age with eczema, with or without sensitization to food allergens.

Methods: One hundred and twenty-three children younger than 2 y of age with eczema and suspected food allergy were included in this prospective study. The children underwent skin-prick test with cow's milk, fresh hen's egg white and wheat. Specific IgE to milk and egg white was analysed. The eczema extent and severity was estimated with SCORAD before and after treatment. Children with a positive skin-prick test were instructed to exclude that food item from their diet. All children were treated with emollients and topical steroids when needed.

Results: Sixty-two of the children were skin-prick positive to at least one of the allergens; 62% had mild, 30% moderate and 8% severe eczema at their first visit. After treatment, 90% had mild, 10% moderate and 0% severe eczema. Forty-six per cent of the children had circulating IgE antibodies to milk or egg white. Ten per cent had specific IgE but negative skin-prick test to the same allergen. This subgroup improved their eczema significantly without elimination diet.

Conclusion: The conventional treatments for children with eczema, i.e. skin care and food elimination, are effective. The beneficial effect of skin care as the first step should not be neglected, and it may not be necessary to eliminate food allergens to relieve skin symptoms in all food-sensitized children with eczema.

Keywords
Eczema; food allergy; food elimination; IgE antibodies; skin-prick test
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14559 (URN)10.1080/08035250510036831 (DOI)
Available from: 2007-06-19 Created: 2007-06-19 Last updated: 2009-05-28
Giampietro, P., Kjellman, N.-I., Oldaeus, G., Wouters-Wesseling, W. & Businco, L. (2001). Hypoallergenicity of an extensively hydrolyzed whey formula. Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 12(2), 83-86
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hypoallergenicity of an extensively hydrolyzed whey formula
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2001 (English)In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 83-86Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Several different protein hydrolysate-based infant formulas have been promoted as hypoallergenic and considered suitable for the dietary management of cow's milk allergy (CMA). Accepting that none of the hydrolysate-based products is completely safe, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that these formulas should be tested in a double-blind placebo-controlled setting and tolerated by at least 90% of children with proven CMA. In principle, this recommendation is also endorsed by the European Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (ESPGAN) and the European Society of Paediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology (ESPACI). In this two-center study, 32 children with proven CMA were tested with the extensive hydrolysate whey formula Nutrilon Pepti, for comparison with Profylac (extensive) and Nan HA (partial) whey hydrolysate products. Skin-prick tests (SPTs) were, respectively, positive to the three hydrolysate formulas in 19%, 15%, and 32% of children. After oral challenge it was concluded that 97% (95% CI: 85-100%) of the children tolerated Nutrilon Pepti, 94% (95% CI: 75-100%) tolerated Profylac, and 64% (95% CI: 37-81%) tolerated Nan HA. This study demonstrates that the extensive hydrolysates Nutrilon Pepti and Profylac are well tolerated in a population of children with proven CMA and that both products can be considered safe for their intended use. This study confirms that a very small number of children react even to extensively hydrolyzed formulas. SPT prior to oral exposure to the hydrolysate-based formulas can indicate whether a child is at risk of showing reactions to the product. Introduction of new products to these children should be carried out under a doctor's supervision. However, the majority of the SPT-positive children did tolerate the two extensively hydrolyzed whey-based formulas tested.

Keywords
Allergenicity, Cow's milk allergy, Cow's milk protein hydrolysate formulas, Pediatric
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-47409 (URN)10.1034/j.1399-3038.2001.012002083.x (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13
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