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Svensson, Niclas
Publications (10 of 56) Show all publications
Gustafsson, M., Cruz, I., Svensson, N. & Karlsson, M. (2020). Scenarios for upgrading and distribution of compressed and liquefied biogas: Energy, environmental, and economic analysis. Journal of Cleaner Production, 256, Article ID 120473.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Scenarios for upgrading and distribution of compressed and liquefied biogas: Energy, environmental, and economic analysis
2020 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 256, article id 120473Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the transition towards fossil-free transports, there is an increasing interest in upgraded biogas, or biomethane, as a vehicle fuel. Liquefied biogas has more than twice as high energy density as compressed biogas, which opens up the opportunity for use in heavy transports and shipping and for more efficient distribution. There are several ways to produce and distribute compressed and liquefied biogas, but very few studies comparing them and providing an overview. This paper investigates the energy balance, environmental impact and economic aspects of different technologies for upgrading, liquefaction and distribution of biogas for use as a vehicle fuel. Furthermore, liquefaction is studied as a method for efficient long-distance distribution.

The results show that the differences between existing technologies for upgrading and liquefaction are small in a well-to-tank perspective, especially if the gas is transported over a long distance before use. Regarding distribution, liquefaction can pay back economically after 25–250 km compared to steel container trailers with compressed gas, and reduce the climate change impact after 10–30 km. Distribution in gas grid is better in all aspects, given that it is available and no addition of propane is required. Liquefaction can potentially expand the geographical boundaries of the market for biogas as a vehicle fuel, and cost reductions resulting from technology maturity allow cost-effective liquefaction even at small production capacities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Biogas, Biomethane, Liquefaction, Energy balance, Environmental analysis, Economic analysis
National Category
Energy Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-163605 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2020.120473 (DOI)2-s2.0-85079198070 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Biogas Research Center
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 35624-3
Available from: 2020-02-17 Created: 2020-02-17 Last updated: 2020-03-13Bibliographically approved
Hagman, L., Eklund, M. & Svensson, N. (2019). Assessment of By-product Valorisation in a Swedish Wheat-Based Biorefinery. Waste and Biomass Valorization
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of By-product Valorisation in a Swedish Wheat-Based Biorefinery
2019 (English)In: Waste and Biomass Valorization, ISSN 1877-2641, E-ISSN 1877-265XArticle in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biorefineries are examples of industries striving towards a circular and bio-based economy through valorising natural raw materials to a spectrum of products. This is a resource-efficient process which also decreases overall environmental impact, as the products from a biorefinery can replace fossil-based products such as plastics or fuels. To become even more resource efficient, an optimisation of the by-product use can increase the performance. This study will evaluate different scenarios for the valorisation of stillage coming from a wheat-based biorefinery. The alternatives range from the direct use of the stillage for fodder, fertiliser or incineration to three different biogas production-based scenarios. The biogas scenarios are divided into the production of fuel at a local or distant plant and the alternative of creating heat and power at the local plant. The results show how locally produced biogas for vehicle fuel and fodder usage are the better alternatives regarding greenhouse gas emissions, the finances of the biorefinery, energy balance and nutrient recycling. The results also indicate that biorefineries with several high-value products may receive lower quality by-product flows, and to these, the biogas solutions become more relevant for valorising stillage while improving value and performance for the biorefinery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2019
Keywords
Biorefinery, Upcycling, Waste, Biogas, Fodder, Bioraffinaderi, avfall, biogas, värde
National Category
Bioprocess Technology Other Industrial Biotechnology Other Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-160001 (URN)10.1007/s12649-019-00667-0 (DOI)
Projects
Biogas Research Center,
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, P35624-3
Available from: 2019-09-03 Created: 2019-09-03 Last updated: 2019-11-22
Gustafsson, M., Cruz, I., Svensson, N. & Karlsson, M. (2019). Technologies for production of liquefied biogas for heavy transports: Energy, environmental, and economic analysis. In: : . Paper presented at Nordic Biogas Conference.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Technologies for production of liquefied biogas for heavy transports: Energy, environmental, and economic analysis
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The heavy transport sector is facing a growth within technology and infrastructure for use of natural gas. This opens an opportunity for the biogas market to grow as well, especially in the form of liquefied biogas (LBG). This study presents an investigation of the energy balance, environmental impact and economic aspects of current technologies for production of LBG: mixed refrigerant cycle, nitrogen cycle, pressure reduction and cryogenic liquefaction. Calculations are based on a review of recent literature and data from the biogas industry. The results show that mixed refrigerant cycle is the most economic and energy efficient technology for liquefaction of upgraded biogas, followed by nitrogen cycle. The lowest electricity use and environmental impact is achieved if the liquefaction process is preceded by amine scrubber upgrading. Pressure reduction liquefaction is inexpensive and can be an alternative in areas connected to a high-pressure gas grid, but as a method for liquefaction it is not very efficient as only about 10% of the incoming gas is liquefied and the rest remains in its gaseous form. Moreover, addition of propane for distribution in the natural gas grid increases the environmental impact compared to other distribution pathways. The cryogenic technology has a higher energy use than other liquefaction technologies but compensates by also including CO₂ separation, which could make it suitable if there is no existing upgrading facility in place. However, there are technical difficulties to overcome and it is not widely implemented.

Keywords
Biogas, Liquefaction, Energy balance, Environmental analysis, Economic analysis
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-160215 (URN)
Conference
Nordic Biogas Conference
Projects
BRC - Biogas Research Center
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency
Available from: 2019-09-11 Created: 2019-09-11 Last updated: 2019-09-18
Gustafsson, M., Svensson, N. & Anderberg, S. (2018). Energy performance indicators as policy support for public bus transport: The case of Sweden. Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, 65, 697-709
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energy performance indicators as policy support for public bus transport: The case of Sweden
2018 (English)In: Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, ISSN 1361-9209, E-ISSN 1879-2340, Vol. 65, p. 697-709Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The share of renewable fuels in Swedish public transport is steadily increasing, in line with European energy and climate goals as well as a national goal of a fossil-free vehicle fleet by 2030. However, the progression towards this goal is quite different among the Swedish regions, and efforts have been made on a national level to compare the public bus transport systems and provide a foundation for policymaking. This paper investigates different ways of assessing and presenting the energy performance of public bus transport systems. The analysis includes use of renewable and fossil fuels as well as energy efficiency and its underlying factors. Various energy performance indicators are presented and discussed with regards to practical implications and applicability for policy support.

A life cycle perspective on fuels (“well-to-wheel”) is found to have clear advantages when it comes to global reductions of fossil energy use and emissions. This requires detailed information about the fuel use, which is not always the case with the existing reporting system. Setting the energy use in relation to number of passengers transported rather than just the distance covered would better reflect the function of the transport system, but is also more uncertain with the current data available.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Energy efficiency, Public transport, Life cycle perspective, Well-to-wheel, Energy performance indicators, Policy support
National Category
Energy Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-152858 (URN)10.1016/j.trd.2018.10.008 (DOI)000453626000046 ()
Projects
Biogas Research Center
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 35624-2
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Biogas Research Center (BRC) - Swedish Energy Agency

Available from: 2018-11-23 Created: 2018-11-23 Last updated: 2019-03-21
Krook, J., Svensson, N., Van Passel, S. & Van Acker, K. (2018). How to evaluate (enhanced) landfill mining: A critical review of recent environmental and economic assessments. In: Peter Tom Jones and Lieven Machiels (Ed.), Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Enhanced Landfill Mining, 2018: . Paper presented at International Symposium on Enhanced Landfill Mining, Date: February 5th-February 6th, Mechelen, Belgium (pp. 317-332). Leuven: KU Leuven
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How to evaluate (enhanced) landfill mining: A critical review of recent environmental and economic assessments
2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Enhanced Landfill Mining, 2018 / [ed] Peter Tom Jones and Lieven Machiels, Leuven: KU Leuven , 2018, p. 317-332Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Landfill mining has been proclaimed as an alternative strategy to address unwanted impacts of waste deposits. In real-life projects, such excavation and processing of deposited waste has mainly been used to facilitate traditional objectives such as remediation, land reclamation or creation of landfill airspace. A key target of recent landfill mining research is, however, to go beyond this type of local motives and enhance the recovery of materials and energy resources by developing advanced processing technologies. Although such an ambitiousapproach clearly displays a wider societal potential, it also adds complexity to the implementation and assessment of pros and cons of landfill mining.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Leuven: KU Leuven, 2018
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-152872 (URN)9789082825909 (ISBN)
Conference
International Symposium on Enhanced Landfill Mining, Date: February 5th-February 6th, Mechelen, Belgium
Available from: 2018-11-26 Created: 2018-11-26 Last updated: 2020-03-10Bibliographically approved
Esguerra, J. L., Krook, J., Svensson, N. & Van Passel, S. (2018). Is enhanced landfill mining profitable?. In: ISWA 2018 Book of Proceedings: . Paper presented at International Solid Waste Association World Congress (ISWA 2018), 22-24 October 2018, Kuala Lumpur, Malysia (pp. 240-245).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is enhanced landfill mining profitable?
2018 (English)In: ISWA 2018 Book of Proceedings, 2018, p. 240-245Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The shift from linear to circular economy has steered the change in perception about landfills. From final to temporary waste storage, landfills are considered as technospheric stocks of resources that can be recovered through innovative technologies in the concept of enhanced landfill mining (ELFM). At present, most ELFM projects are in pilot-scale and it remains as a proof of concept. Economic feasibility is one of the primary considerations that must be satisfied prior to its full-scale realization. Several economic assessments were conducted in recent years but there is no systematic synthesis of these studies to date. The aim of this review is to compile various empirical insights of previous economic assessments of ELFM in relation to the employed methodological choices. With pre-defined exclusion criteria, 15 studies were selected in this review. For the empirical part, the identified main economic drivers for costs are separation and sorting, thermal treatment and transportation, while for benefits are material sales, recovered land and energy sales. In more than half of the studies, the costs exceeded the benefits concluding that ELFM is not profitable.  The few potentially profitable cases mainly depend on varying the system conditions defined by market prices and regulations. These require changes that are more radical, if not impossible. For the method part, costs and benefits are accounted at different levels of aggregation, scope and scale—that is from process to sub-process level, from private to societal economics, and from laboratory to pilot scale, respectively. As most studies are based on pilot scale, if not purely conceptual, data estimation mainly depends on extrapolation from these pilot projects or on direct adoption of secondary data. In spite of the expected uncertainties in model, scenario and parameter, less than half of the studies employed sensitivity and uncertainty analyses. With it being neglected, their results can be considered to have a weak reliability for practical use in a full-scale ELFM project implementation. A need for systematic framework for early-stage assessment is highlighted to capture both stochastic and epistemic uncertainties. Process and system upscaling with exploratory scenario development, and participatory data collection in ranges rather than in absolute terms are some of the suggested approaches to generate results with a certain level of confidence. In this way, the future economic assessments of ELFM can veer away from simple profitability assessments. Instead, it focuses on knowledge development despite the limited information that is inherent to emerging concepts. Most importantly, it provides reliable information that can be used as a decision-support for various stakeholders such as project managers, technology developers, and policy makers towards the advancement of ELFM.

Keywords
economic assessment, enhanced landfill mining
National Category
Environmental Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-153269 (URN)
Conference
International Solid Waste Association World Congress (ISWA 2018), 22-24 October 2018, Kuala Lumpur, Malysia
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 721185
Available from: 2018-12-07 Created: 2018-12-07 Last updated: 2020-03-10Bibliographically approved
Esguerra, J. L., Svensson, N., Krook, J., Van Passel, S. & Van Acker, K. (2018). The economic and environmental performance of a landfill mining project from the viewpoint of an industrial landfill owner. In: Peter Tom Jones and Lieven Machiels (Ed.), Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Enhanced Landfill Mining, 5-6 February, 2018, Mechelen, Belgium: . Paper presented at The 4th International Symposium on Enhanced Landfill Mining, 5-6 February, 2018, Mechelen, Belgium (pp. 389-396). Leuven, Belgium: University of Leuven
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The economic and environmental performance of a landfill mining project from the viewpoint of an industrial landfill owner
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2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Enhanced Landfill Mining, 5-6 February, 2018, Mechelen, Belgium / [ed] Peter Tom Jones and Lieven Machiels, Leuven, Belgium: University of Leuven , 2018, p. 389-396Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The EU Commission’s circular economy strategy pushes for a higher recycling rate and a more long-term waste management practice.1 Enhanced Landfill Mining (ELFM) can contribute to this agenda as a better landfill management option, by shifting the landfill paradigm from dumping or as end-storage of waste to resource recovery or as temporary storage of resources.2-4 Through ELFM, landfills becomes a secondary source of both material (Waste-to-Material, WtM) and energy (Waste-to-Energy, WtE) with the use of innovative technologies.3,4

Several studies explored the environmental and/or economic aspects of ELFM having different scopes and objectives. Some cover the entire process value chain while others additionally focused on comparing technological choices for WtE,5–7 WtM,8,9 and even ELFM waste valorisation.10 Furthermore, for the economic assessment, regulation-related costs and benefits as landfill taxes, gate fees and green certificates5,11,12 are also accounted for. Regarding the identification of economic hotspots, many of these studies concluded similar processes to be important. However, most of these studies were based on either hypothetical cases, or real cases but with small-scale excavation and separation using non-sophisticated set-ups, which are not likely to be used for large-scale processing. Hence, more uncertainty is expected from the lack of actual ELFM demonstration projects.

The aim of this study is to analyse the main contributing factors that influence environmental and economic performance of ELFM, considering the landfill owner’s viewpoint. The study is based on a real case of excavation and subsequent separation in an existing stationary facility. Specifically, the influence of the prevailing system conditions is investigated as defined by the current legislation and the market situation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Leuven, Belgium: University of Leuven, 2018
Keywords
landfill mining, sustainability assessment
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-145208 (URN)9789082825909 (ISBN)
Conference
The 4th International Symposium on Enhanced Landfill Mining, 5-6 February, 2018, Mechelen, Belgium
Available from: 2018-02-16 Created: 2018-02-16 Last updated: 2019-05-09Bibliographically approved
Hagman, L., Blumenthal, A., Eklund, M. & Svensson, N. (2018). The role of biogas solutions in sustainable biorefineries. Journal of Cleaner Production, 172, 3982-3989
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of biogas solutions in sustainable biorefineries
2018 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 172, p. 3982-3989Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biorefineries strive to maximise product mix and value while contributing to the bioeconomy. Circularityand waste valorisation are some important but often neglected concepts in this context. As such, biogassolutions in biorefineries could be a key technology to improve sustainability. This study has, through aliterature review and investigation into three Swedish case studies, analysed this relationship betweenbiogas solutions and biorefineries by assessing the added value and development potential to whichbiogas solutions may contribute. This analysis across agricultural, forest, and marine sectors indicatesthat biogas solutions contribute with several added values, including through making the biorefinerymore sustainable and competitive. The study also shows that biogas solutions can be an enabler ofbiorefinery development through making the system more resilient and versatile, as well as throughimproving the value of the product portfolio.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Biorefinery, biogas, bioeconomy, valorisation, anaerobic digestion, waste management, Bioraffinaderi, biogas, bioekonomi, avfallshantering
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143022 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.03.180 (DOI)000423002500084 ()2-s2.0-85016415075 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency
Note

Funding agencies: Biogas Research Center (BRC); Swedish Energy Agency

Available from: 2017-11-29 Created: 2017-11-29 Last updated: 2019-06-13Bibliographically approved
Laner, D., Cencic, O., Svensson, N. & Krook, J. (2016). Quantitative Analysis of Critical Factors for the Climate Impact of Landfill Mining. Environmental Science and Technology, 50(13), 6882-6891
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quantitative Analysis of Critical Factors for the Climate Impact of Landfill Mining
2016 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 50, no 13, p. 6882-6891Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Landfill mining has been proposed as an innovative strategy to mitigate environmental risks associated with landfills, to recover secondary raw materials and energy from the deposited waste, and to enable high-valued land uses at the site. The present study quantitatively assesses the importance of specific factors and conditions for the net contribution of landfill mining to global warming using a novel, set-based modeling approach and provides policy recommendations for facilitating the development of projects contributing to global warming mitigation. Building on life-cycle assessment, scenario modeling and sensitivity analysis methods are used to identify critical factors for the climate impact of landfill mining. The net contributions to global warming of the scenarios range from -1550 (saving) to 640 (burden) kg CO(2)e per Mg of excavated waste. Nearly 90% of the results total variation can be explained by changes in four factors, namely the landfill gas management in the reference case (i.e., alternative to mining the landfill), the background energy system, the composition of the excavated waste, and the applied waste-to-energy technology. Based on the analyses, circumstances under which landfill mining should be prioritized or not are identified and sensitive parameters for the climate impact assessment of landfill mining are highlighted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2016
National Category
Other Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130387 (URN)10.1021/acs.est.6b01275 (DOI)000379366300036 ()27282202 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Christian Doppler Laboratory for Anthropogenic Resources; Swedish Innovation Agency VINNOVA

Available from: 2016-08-15 Created: 2016-08-05 Last updated: 2017-11-28
Ammenberg, J., Svensson, B., Karlsson, M., Svensson, N., Björn, A., Karlsson, M., . . . Eklund, M. (2015). Biogas Research Center, BRC: Slutrapport för etapp 1. Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biogas Research Center, BRC: Slutrapport för etapp 1
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2015 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Biogas Research Center (BRC) är ett kompetenscentrum för biogasforskning som finansieras av Energimyndigheten, LiU och ett flertal externa organisationer med en tredjedel vardera. BRC har en mycket bred tvärvetenskaplig inriktning och sammanför biogasrelaterad kompetens från flera olika områden för att skapa interaktion på flera olika plan:

  • mellan näringsliv, akademi och samhälle,
  • mellan olika perspektiv, samt
  • mellan olika discipliner och kompetensområden.

BRC:s vision är:

Resurseffektiva biogaslösningar finns genomförda i många nya tillämpningar och bidrar till en mer hållbar energiförsörjning, förbättrat miljötillstånd och goda affärer.

BRC:s särskilda roll för att uppnå denna vision är att bidra med kunskapsförsörjning och process-/teknikutveckling för att facilitera utveckling, innovation och implementering av biogaslösningar. Resurseffektivitet är ett nyckelord, vilket handlar om att förbättra befintliga processer och system samt utveckla biogaslösningar i nya sektorer och möjliggöra användning av nya substrat.

For BRC:s etapp 1, den första tvåårsperioden mellan 2012-2014, var forskningsprojekten organiserade enligt tabellen nedan. Den visar viktiga utmaningar för biogasproducenter och andra intressenter, samt hur dessa ”angreps” med åtta forskningsprojekt. Fem av projekten var av explorativ karaktär i bemärkelsen att de var bredare och mer framtidsorienterade - exempelvis utvärderade flera möjliga tekniska utvecklingsmöjligheter (EP1-5). Tre projekt hade ett tydligare fokus på teknik- och processutveckling (DP6-8).

I den här slutrapporten ges en kortfattad bakgrundsbeskrivning och det finns en introduktion till vad den här typen av kompetenscentrum innebär generellt. Därefter finns mer detaljerad information om BRC, exempelvis gäller det centrumets etablering, relevans, vision, hörnstenar och utveckling. De deltagande organisationerna presenteras, både forskargrupperna vid Linköpings universitet och partners och medlemmar. Vidare finns en mer utförlig introduktion till och beskrivning av utmaningarna i tabellen och kortfattat information om forskningsprojekten, följt av ett kapitel som berör måluppfyllelse och den externa utvärdering som gjorts av BRC:s verksamhet. Detaljerad, listad information finns till stor del i bilagorna.

Kortfattat kan det konstateras att måluppfyllelsen överlag är god. Det är speciellt positivt att så många vetenskapliga artiklar publicerats (eller är på gång att publiceras) kopplat till forskningsprojekten och även i det vidare centrumperspektivet. Helt klart förekommer en omfattande verksamhet inom och kopplat till BRC. I etapp 2 är det viktigt att öka andelen mycket nöjda partner och medlemmar, där nu hälften är nöjda och hälften mycket nöjda. Det handlar framför allt om stärkt kommunikation, interaktion och projektledning. Under 2015 förväntas åtminstone två doktorsexamina, där avhandlingarna har stor koppling till forskningen inom etapp 1.

I början på år 2014 skedde en extern utvärdering av verksamheten vid BRC med huvudsyftet att bedöma hur väl centrumet lyckats med etableringen samt att granska om det fanns förutsättningar för framtida framgångsrik verksamhet. Generellt var utfallet mycket positivt och utvärderarna konstaterade att BRC på kort tid lyckats etablera en verksamhet som fungerar väl och engagerar det stora flertalet deltagande aktörer, inom relevanta områden och där de flesta involverade ser BRC som en befogad och väl fungerande satsning, som de har för avsikt att även fortsättningsvis stödja. Utvärderingen bidrog också med flera relevant tips och till att belysa utmaningar.

Utöver denna slutrapport finns separata publikationer från forskningsprojekten.

Arbetet som presenteras i rapporten har finansierats av Energimyndigheten och de medverkande organisationerna.

Abstract [en]

Biogas Research Center (BRC) is a center of excellence in biogas research funded by the Swedish Energy Agency, Linköping University and a number of external organizations with one-third each. BRC has a very broad interdisciplinary approach, bringing together biogas-related skills from several areas to create interaction on many levels:

  • between industry, academia and society,
  • between different perspectives, and
  • between different disciplines and areas of expertise.

BRC’s vision is:

BRC contributes to the vision by advancing knowledge and technical development, as well as by facilitating development, innovation and business. Resource efficiency is central, improving existing processes and systems as well as establishing biogas solutions in new sectors and enabling use of new substrates.

For BRC phase 1, the first two year period from 2012-2014, the research projects were organized in accordance with the table below showing important challenges for biogas producers and other stakeholders, and how these challenges were tackled in eight research projects. Five of the projects had an exploratory nature, meaning that they were broader, more future oriented and, for example, evaluated several different technology paths (EP1-5). Three projects focused more on technology and process development (DP6-8).

This final report briefly presents the background and contains some information about competence centers in general. Thereafter follows more detailed information about BRC, for example, regarding the establishment, relevance, organization, vision, corner stones and development. The participating organizations are presented, both the research groups within Linköping University and the partners and members. Further on, there is a more detailed introduction to and description of the challenges mentioned in the table above and a short presentation from each of the research projects, followed by some sections dealing with fulfillment of objectives and an external assessment of BRC. Detailed, listed information is commonly provided in the appendices.

Briefly, the fulfillment of objectives is good and it is very positive that so many scientific articles have been published (or are to be published) from the research projects and also within the wider center perspective. Clearly, extensive and relevant activities are ongoing within and around BRC. In phase 2 it essential to increase the share of very satisfied partners and members, where now half of them are satisfied and the other half is very satisfied. For this purpose, improved communication, interaction and project management are central. During 2015, at least two PhD theses are expected, to a large extent based on the research from BRC phase 1.

In the beginning of 2014 an external assessment of BRC was carried out, with the main purpose to assess how well the center has been established and to review the conditions for a future, successful competence center. Generally, the outcome was very positive and the assessors concluded that BRC within a short period of time had been able to establish a well-functioning organization engaging a large share of the participants within relevant areas, and that most of the involved actors look upon BRC as a justifiable and well working investment that they plan to continue to support. The assessment also contributed with several relevant tips of improvements and to clarify challenges to address.

This report is written in Swedish, but for each research project there will be reports and/or scientific papers published in English.

The work presented in this report has been financed by the Swedish Energy Agency and the participating organizations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2015. p. 99
Series
Biogas Research Center (BRC) Report ; 2014:1
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114037 (URN)
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency
Available from: 2015-02-05 Created: 2015-02-05 Last updated: 2019-06-13Bibliographically approved
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