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Björklund, M. & Martinsen, U. (2019). E-consumers’ role in greening distribution. In: : . Paper presented at 6th International EurOMA -Sustainable operations and supply chains forum, Gothenburg, Sweden, 18-19 March, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>E-consumers’ role in greening distribution
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper aims to address the knowledge gap regarding e-consumers’ role in greening distribution by investigating the exchange of distribution related information between consumers, e-tailers and logistics service providers (LSPs). The 40 largest Swedish e-tailers' homepages were visited, and three e-tailers and four LSPs were interviewed. Consumers appear to have limited ability to affect the greening of distribution. Only a few e-tailers offered green distribution on the online purchase. Lack of communication between LSPs and e-tailers, regarding content, direction and frequency was one reason behind the slow development towards greening distribution.

National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-158469 (URN)
Conference
6th International EurOMA -Sustainable operations and supply chains forum, Gothenburg, Sweden, 18-19 March, 2019
Funder
Swedish Retail and Wholesale Development CouncilThe Kamprad Family Foundation
Available from: 2019-07-01 Created: 2019-07-01 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Martinsen, U. & Huge-Brodin, M. (2019). Exploring retailers’ learning towards greener supply chains. In: : . Paper presented at NOFOMA, Oslo, Norway, June 12-14, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring retailers’ learning towards greener supply chains
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Purpose

In order for retailers to decrease environmental impact from logistics, there is a need for a better understanding of what can be done from a retailer perspective in their relationships with logistics service providers (LSPs). This paper aims to explore how retailers can learn in order to become more environmentally sustainable in their relationships with LSPs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on an in-depth, single case study of a Swedish retailer. The paper relies on learning theories, which are applied to the case study that is of longitudinal nature and covers a period of six years. 

Findings

Findings indicate that there are different ways to learn in order to improve environmental sustainability in relationships with LSPs. Specifically, both single- and double-loop learning is of relevance. In terms of what can be learnt, the results suggest a number of different learning items that have potential to contribute to a decrease in environmental impact.

Research limitations/implications

This paper presents a first attempt to categorise different ways of learning for retailers who want to improve their environmental sustainability in relationships with LSPs. Deeper analysis is needed to understand if the learning items can be divided into more specific categories, such as different types of environmental practices (e.g. technological or managerial).

Practical implications

The results will provide retailers with a better understanding of how to take the next step in terms of greening their relationships with LSPs. Environmentally ambitious LSPs can, in turn, benefit from deeper insight into their customers’ internal work and take action based on this knowledge.

Original/value

Due to its longitudinal approach and the application of theory on organisational learning, this paper offers a novel perspective on retailers’ strive in increasing environmental sustainability in relationships with LSPs.

Keywords
Environmentally sustainable logistics, logistics service providers, retailers, learning, longitudinal case study
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-158472 (URN)
Conference
NOFOMA, Oslo, Norway, June 12-14, 2019
Funder
Swedish Retail and Wholesale Development Council
Available from: 2019-07-01 Created: 2019-07-01 Last updated: 2019-09-05Bibliographically approved
Haag, L., Martinsen, U. & Sandberg, E. (2019). Operational capabilities for facilitating the internationalisation of retailers - A multiple case study of three Swedish retail companies. In: : . Paper presented at The 6th Nordic Retail and Wholesale Conference.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Operational capabilities for facilitating the internationalisation of retailers - A multiple case study of three Swedish retail companies
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-160818 (URN)
Conference
The 6th Nordic Retail and Wholesale Conference
Available from: 2019-10-09 Created: 2019-10-09 Last updated: 2019-10-09
Haag, L., Martinsen, U. & Sandberg, E. (2019). Supply chain capabilities for facilitating the internationalisation of retailers: a multiple case study of three Swedish retail companies. International Review of Retail Distribution & Consumer Research, 29(3), 321-339
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Supply chain capabilities for facilitating the internationalisation of retailers: a multiple case study of three Swedish retail companies
2019 (English)In: International Review of Retail Distribution & Consumer Research, ISSN 0959-3969, E-ISSN 1466-4402, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 321-339Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Market-oriented aspects of retail internationalisation have received a lot of research attention since the 1990s. However, beyond these aspects lies also supply-chain oriented capabilities that are necessary for retailers to successfully internationalise into foreign sales markets. By using a perspective based on resource-based theories, this paper explores supply-chain oriented capabilities that facilitate retail internationalisation. The research is based on a multiple case study of three Swedish retailers. Through the perspective of research based theories, specifically capabilities, the empirical data is studied in a single-case as well as a cross-case analysis. Findings reveal three supply chain-oriented capability categories (leadership capability, integration capability and learning capability) of importance for retail internationalisation. Resources necessary for the capabilities are to be found internally at the retailer, but also externally at other firms. This research adds to the market-oriented knowledge on retail internationalisation by adding a supply-chain oriented perspective. Further, it provides an understanding of the early phases of retail internationalisation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
Supply-chain capabilities, retail internationalisation, resource-based theories (RBT), multiple case study, foreign establishment
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-158603 (URN)10.1080/09593969.2019.1598467 (DOI)000470201900006 ()
Available from: 2019-07-03 Created: 2019-07-03 Last updated: 2020-03-27Bibliographically approved
Martinsen, U., Rogerson, S. & Vendela, S. (2019). The impact of power balances and trust on modal shift possibilities. In: : . Paper presented at 31ST NOFOMA CONFERENCE, Oslo, Norway, 12-14 June, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of power balances and trust on modal shift possibilities
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Purpose

For logistics to become environmentally sustainable, modal shift from road to more energy-efficient alternatives, such as rail and sea, is needed. Power balances and trust between actors may drive and hinder the collaboration needed to induce change. The purpose is to increase the understanding of how power balances and trust between shippers and transport providers influence a change from road to more environmentally sustainable modes of transport.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper combines theoretical perspectives with preliminary interviews with both shippers and transport providers involved in modal shift. Theoretically, it builds on change management principles and two inter-organisational perspectives, namely power and trust.   

Findings

The results suggest that power balances and trust do indeed have an influence on the probability of modal shift possibilities, albeit they have different impact during the different phases of change.

Research limitations/implications (if applicable)

This paper is mainly conceptual, but draws on insights from preliminary interviews with shippers and transport providers. Case studies of companies or dyads that have changed from road to rail or sea would be fruitful to validate the findings presented in this abstract.

Practical implications (if applicable)

Actors, whether being transport providers or shippers, that want to initiate a change toward modal shift, can benefit from the findings. Specifically, they illuminate power bases and different forms of trust that can have a direct impact on modal shift being realised or not.

Original/value

Contrary to previous research, this paper offers a novel perspective of modal shift by analysing power balances and trust between transport providers and shippers.

Keywords: Modal shift, power bases, environmentally sustainable logistics, supply chain collaboration.

 

1. Purpose of this paper

For logistics to become environmentally sustainable, modal shift from road to more energy-efficient alternatives, such as rail and sea, is needed (Regeringskansliet, 2018). This is a preferable choice in the direction of reducing both climate impact from transportation, as well as congestion on roads. Since de-speeding logistics is found to be a cost-effective way to decrease CO2 emissions (McKinnon, 2016), rail and sea transport should be an attractive option for companies striving towards environmental sustainability.

In the light of this, it is somewhat discouraging to find that a shift on modes from road to rail and sea is slow. One reason for this slow progress is that decisions regarding which mode of transport to use are not taken by individual actors. On the contrary, several actors influence the decision, which makes the decision-making process more complicated. Key actors are companies sending and receiving goods (shippers) and transport providers, that arrange and execute the transport. This paper takes its starting-point in these two groups of actors: the shipper and the transport provider. Shippers are of large relevance as they are the ones with a demand of transports and with requirements linked to these. Influencing factors underlying the choice of transport are cost, transport quality, transport time and reliability (Flodén et al., 2017). Transport providers, on the other hand, respond to shippers demands, as a majority of shippers sub-contract their transport operations through a third party (Lammgård and Andersson, 2014). 

To obtain modal shift in shippers’ supply chains to a larger extent, change is needed. Such change requires the participation of both shippers and transport providers and interaction between them is a prerequisite for success. Two critical change management principles, influencing the interaction between actors, are power and trust. Power balances between actors may both drive and hinder the collaboration necessary to induce change. At the same time, trust is likely to be of importance as an enabler for modal shift. The purpose of this paper is to increase the understanding of how power balances and trust between shippers and transport providers influence a change from road to more environmentally sustainable modes of transport.

2.  Design/methodology/approach

This paper combines theoretical perspectives with preliminary interviews with both shippers and transport providers involved in modal shift. Theoretically, it builds on change management principles and two inter-organisational perspectives, namely power and trust. Firstly, organisational change can be divided into three phases: unfreeze, change and refreeze (Fawcett et al., 2012). In this paper, two of these phases – the unfreeze and refreeze phase - are in focus, as they are the ones where power and trust are most likely to influence the potential for modal shift.

 

Power is suggested to entail "the ability to evoke a change in another's behavior" (Gaski, 1984, p. 10). Power is relationship-specific and an actor with high power over another in one relationship, might be at a power disadvantage in another relationship. Power can be said to stem from power bases possessed by the actors in a relationship. A commonly applied framework for such bases is the one suggested by French and Raven (1959), who propose five power bases: reward, coercive, expert, referent and legitimate power. Reward power means an ability to mediate rewards to a target actor; coercive instead includes punishment to that target; expert power means a skill or knowledge desired by the target; referent power occurs when the target values identification with the source, and; legitimate power entails a belief by the target that the source has a natural right to influence. In addition to these five power bases, supply chain position is suggested to be of relevance and not covered by French and Raven (1959). According to Kähkönen and Lintukangas (2010), customers often have power over suppliers.

 

Trust can be defined as “an expectation held by an agent that its trading partner will behave in a mutually acceptable manner” (Sako and Helper, 1998, p. 388). According to Sako (1992), there are three different types of trust: contractual, competence and goodwill. Contractual trust means a belief that collaborating actors will stay true to the contract, while competence trust entails a belief that a collaborating actor has the ability to conduct specific tasks. Finally, goodwill trust occurs when actors are willing to exceed the expected contractual agreements. The three types of trust can be said to be levels of trust, where contractual trust is the lowest level, but as relationships develop, trust also can develop and turn into competence trust or goodwill trust.

 

Empirically, the paper relies on preliminary findings from interviews with shippers and transport providers. The interviews have focused on actor collaboration for modal shift to take place and have identified both possibilities and difficulties in the different stages of change that modal shift entails.

3.  Findings 

The results suggest that power balances and trust do indeed have an influence on the probability of modal shift possibilities, albeit they have different impact during the different phases of change. In the unfreeze phase, the initiating actor needs to have power advantage over the other actor, as this appears to be necessary for change to take place. In other words, modal shift does not appear to happen by itself, and therefore some degree of power advantage is needed. The power advantage appears to derive mainly from expert power, coercive power or supply chain position. Interestingly, these power bases can be of different relevance depending on whether the initiating actor is the transport provider or the shipper in a relationship between the two actors. Further, some level of trust between the transport provider and the shipper is needed, but especially in the case of new relationships, this trust is not likely to be more than in the form of contract trust.

 

As change has been done and the next step is the refreeze phase, the challenge lies in maintaining the model shift. Here, trust becomes of higher importance than power. If competence trust or even goodwill trust have developed, there is high likelihood of a long-term change. However, if trust has not developed and sufficiently, there might instead be a high likelihood of the change to sustain.

4.  Research limitations/implications

This paper is mainly conceptual, but draws on insights from preliminary interviews with shippers and transport providers. Case studies of companies or dyads that have changed from road to rail or sea would be fruitful to validate the findings presented in this abstract. 

5.  Practical implications

Actors, whether being transport providers or shippers, that want to initiate a change toward modal shift, can benefit from the findings. Specifically, they illuminate power bases and different forms of trust that can have a direct impact on modal shift being realised or not.

6.   Originality/value  Contrary to previous research, this paper offers a novel perspective of modal shift by analysing power balances and trust between transport providers and shippers.

National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-158471 (URN)
Conference
31ST NOFOMA CONFERENCE, Oslo, Norway, 12-14 June, 2019
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 46953-1
Available from: 2019-07-01 Created: 2019-07-01 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Martinsen, U. (2018). Learning to be greener: A longitudinal perspective of retailers’ relationships with logistics providers. In: : . Paper presented at The 6th Nordic Retail and Wholesale Conference (NRWC), Reykjavik, Iceland, 7th – 9th November 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning to be greener: A longitudinal perspective of retailers’ relationships with logistics providers
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-158494 (URN)
Conference
The 6th Nordic Retail and Wholesale Conference (NRWC), Reykjavik, Iceland, 7th – 9th November 2018
Funder
Swedish Retail and Wholesale Development Council
Available from: 2019-07-02 Created: 2019-07-02 Last updated: 2019-09-05Bibliographically approved
Rogerson, S. & Sallnäs, U. (2017). Internal coordination to enable high load factor. International Journal of Logistics Management, 28(4), 1142-1167
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internal coordination to enable high load factor
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Logistics Management, ISSN 0957-4093, E-ISSN 1758-6550, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 1142-1167Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to clarify how activities may be coordinated within shippers’ organisations to enable high load factor (a key aspect of transport efficiency).

 

Design/methodology/approach – A multiple-case study involving three shippers was conducted, in which the logistics or transport managers of each company were interviewed. The cases were analysed according to (1) which activities were coordinated to achieve high load factor, (2) interdependencies between the activities, and (3) the coordination mechanisms that shippers adopted.

 

Findings – A matrix is developed to show the differences in applying various coordination mechanisms in eight categories, according to (1) intrafunctional or interfunctional coordination, (2) sequential or reciprocal interdependencies, and (3) the number of activities (dyadic or multiple). For example, coordination mechanisms aimed at exerting control are more suitable for intrafunctional than interfunctional interaction; interfunctional coordination relies more on mechanisms that aim to increase the understanding of transport-related issues among non-logistics activities.

 

Research limitations/implications – The study is based on data from three Swedish companies.

 

Practical implications – Managers are provided with suggestions for coordinating activities when their goal is to improve load factor. These findings are of interest for reducing costs and emissions.

 

Social implications

 

Originality/value – In response to suggestions in the earlier literature that shippers could improve their internal coordination to improve their load factor, this paper articulates several mechanisms for performing such coordination in eight situations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2017
Keywords
load factor, freight transport, interdependencies, coordination mechanism, shipper, green logistics
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-132744 (URN)10.1108/IJLM-02-2016-0031 (DOI)000414260300010 ()
Funder
Swedish Retail and Wholesale Development Council
Note

Funding agencies: VINNOVA (the Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems); Swedish Retail and Wholesale Development Council

Available from: 2016-11-22 Created: 2016-11-22 Last updated: 2017-11-20Bibliographically approved
Sallnäs, U. (2016). Coordination to manage dependencies between logistics service providers and shippers: An environmental perspective. International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, 46(3), 316-340
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coordination to manage dependencies between logistics service providers and shippers: An environmental perspective
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, ISSN 0960-0035, E-ISSN 1758-664X, ISSN 0960-0035, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 316-340Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Although it has been suggested that shippers’ demands regarding environmental practices appear to have an impact on the environmental work of LSPs, limited attention has been given to environmental practices in the relationships between LSPs and shippers. The purpose of this paper is to explore how dependencies between LSPs and shippers can influence the way in which environmental practices are coordinated in the relationships between them.

Design/methodology/approach: Four dyadic case studies, each consisting of one LSP and one shipper, provide the empirical basis for this paper.

Findings: Two types of dependencies are suggested as having an influence over the coordination of environmental practices in LSP-shipper relationships: dependence between LSPs and shippers as such; and dependence with regard to specific environmental practices. In addition, the environmental ambition of the actors is found to be of relevance when LSPs and shippers coordinate environmental practices between them. Based on these parameters, different coordination mechanisms for environmental practices in LSP-shipper relationships are discussed.

Research limitations/implications: The research is limited to four cases in a Swedish context. Additional cases might provide other insights into LSP-shipper relationships and thereby lead to modifications of the proposed conceptual framework.

Practical implications: The results can help both LSPs and shippers improve their work with environmental practices through the use of the appropriate coordination mechanisms in their inter-organisational relationships.

Originality/value: Contrary to previous research, which mainly takes one party’s perspective, this paper takes a dyadic approach and thereby adds valuable knowledge to the inter-organisational aspects of LSPs’ environmental work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2016
Keywords
Logistics service providers, Coordination mechanisms, Dependencies, Environmental practices, Inter-organizational relationships, Shippers
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126659 (URN)10.1108/IJPDLM-06-2014-0143 (DOI)000374149800004 ()
Funder
VINNOVASwedish Retail and Wholesale Development Council
Note

Funding agencies:  VINNOVA (Swedens innovation agency); Swedish Retail and Wholesale Development Council

Available from: 2016-03-31 Created: 2016-03-31 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Huge-Brodin, M., Martinsen Sallnäs, U. & Karlsson, M. (2015). Sustainable Logistics Service Providers: A strategic perspective on green logistics service provision. In: Lim, M., Jones, C., Day, J. and Smith, S. (Ed.), Proceedings from the 20th Annual Logistics Research Network Conference: Resource Efficiency and Sustainability in Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Paper presented at 20th Annual Logistics Research Network Conference (pp. 1-8). Derby: The Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport & Derby University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainable Logistics Service Providers: A strategic perspective on green logistics service provision
2015 (English)In: Proceedings from the 20th Annual Logistics Research Network Conference: Resource Efficiency and Sustainability in Logistics and Supply Chain Management / [ed] Lim, M., Jones, C., Day, J. and Smith, S., Derby: The Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport & Derby University , 2015, p. 1-8Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Environmental sustainability is of increasing importance. The Logistics Service Industry is of specific interest: its impact from mainly transports is still increasing. However, the sustainability of any company also includes a long-term prosperous business. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how a hauler, as an example of a logistics service provider (LSP), through approaching environmental sustainability from an overall strategic business perspective, can succeed long-term.

Research Approach: The paper builds on an in-depth case study of a medium sized privately held LSP. The case was selected as it stands out compared to its competitors with respect to environmental engagement and long-term commitment to sustainability related issues. Starting from a framework based on RBT (Resource Based Theory), the case is analysed regarding how various types of resources and dynamic capabilities can contribute to sustainable competitive advantage.

Findings and Originality: The case study illustrates how an LSP can put various resources to work and how resources can be combined. It is demonstrated that these combinations of resources are valuable, rare and perfectly inimitable, and that they to a high extent are well established in the company, and hence not rely in certain individuals. The cases study further demonstrates how an LSP can sense possibilities, seize opportunities and, when needed, reshape its business accordingly, and hence possess critical dynamic capabilities. This research contributes by analysing an LSP that, in contrast to most of its competitors, has succeeded in making its sustainable development a strategic asset. This asset reaches beyond the commonly acknowledged efficiency gains, and is an interesting example of how an LSP through its dynamic capabilities can gain a unique position.

Research Impact: The strategic perspective through an RBT lens has previously been applied to LSPs mainly in survey based research. The results of this paper are rare, as they build on a real-case situation of a successful and sustainable LSP, while the extant research of success among LSPs going greener mostly suggest future development to become successful. This paper suggests how sustainable development can become a strategic asset for an LSP, and how dynamic capabilities can support that. Theories on dynamic capabilities have previously only been applied to a very limited extent on the analysis of LSPs aiming for going greener

Practical Impact: Based on this case, other LSPs may get inspiration to how they can develop their business to become more sustainable. The analysis points to that greening efforts cannot be seen in isolation, rather it is the combination of efforts, uniquely orchestrated for each case, that can make a difference. Therefore, the results point to relationships between various efforts, as well as how the different greening efforts fit the context of the LSP.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Derby: The Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport & Derby University, 2015
Keywords
logistics service provider, sustainable development, strategy, case study
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121780 (URN)978-1-904564-50-8 (ISBN)
Conference
20th Annual Logistics Research Network Conference
Funder
TrenOp, Transport Research Environment with Novel PerspectivesSwedish Retail and Wholesale Development Council
Available from: 2015-10-05 Created: 2015-10-05 Last updated: 2016-11-30
Martinsen, U. & Huge-Brodin, M. (2014). Environmental practices as offerings and requirements in the logistics market. Logistics Research, 7(115), 1-22
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental practices as offerings and requirements in the logistics market
2014 (English)In: Logistics Research, ISSN 1865-0368, Vol. 7, no 115, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The importance of environmental consider- ation for companies is mounting. This applies particularly well to logistics service providers (LSPs) who will have a possibility to compete by being greener than their com- petitors by offering services that include different green practices. As their customers play a vital role with regard to the extent to which LSPs can include environmental practices in their business, the interface between these actors is of interest. The purpose of this article is to describe and explain how environmental practices are reflected in offerings and requirements on the logistics market. A systematic literature review of what has been published on environmental practices as parts of offerings and requirements was complemented by a wider literature review. Empirical data were collected through a home page scan and a case study of four LSP–shipper dyads. With a starting point in stakeholder theory, the different data sets were analysed separately as well as combined, and similarities and differences were discussed. The findings point to differences in the way that LSPs and shippers offer and require environmental practices on their home pages and reasons for this are suggested to be due to their different types of stakeholders. Further, the environmental practices in relationships between LSP and shippers are often more relationship specific than practices on home pages. Based on the combined findings of the data sets, a classification of environmental practices as reflected in offerings and requirements on the logistics market is proposed. The article is mainly based on com- panies’ practices in Sweden and thereby provides a pos- sibility to extend the research into other countries as well. By taking two perspectives, the findings from this research can have implications both for purchasing and marketing of logistic services. The paper suggests which environ- mental practices that LSPs and shippers can offer or require in different stages of their business relationships. Contrary to most research within green logistics, this paper takes a business perspective on environmental practices. Further, the dual perspective of LSPs and shippers taken in this paper offers novel insight into how environmental practices can be included at different stages of LSP–shipper relationships. 

Keywords
Logistics Service Provider, Green logistics, Offering, Environmental Practice, Stakeholder Theory, Logistics Market
National Category
Transport Systems and Logistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-107909 (URN)10.1007/s12159-014-0115-y (DOI)2-s2.0-84919934818 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-06-23 Created: 2014-06-23 Last updated: 2016-11-30
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8969-9396

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