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Forslund Frykedal, K. & Hammar Chiriac, E. (2018). Student Collaboration in Group Work: Inclusion as Participation. International journal of disability, development and education (2), 183-198
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Student Collaboration in Group Work: Inclusion as Participation
2018 (English)In: International journal of disability, development and education, ISSN 1034-912X, E-ISSN 1465-346X, no 2, p. 183-198Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Group work is an educational mode that promotes learning and socialisation among students. In this study, we focused on the inclusive processes when students work in small groups. The aim was to investigate and describe students’ inclusive and collaborative processes in group work and how the teacher supported or impeded these transactions. Social Interdependence Theory was utilised as the theoretical perspective overarching the study. The observational data employed were collected by video-recording group work. A part of Black-Hawkins framework of participation was used to define inclusion and for the analysis of inclusive and collaborative processes. The results suggest that students’ active participation in the discussions around the group work structures and analytical discussions, together with the teacher’s more defined feedback and avoidance of the traditional authoritative role, are examples of prerequisites for group work to be enacted in an inclusive manner.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
classroom; collaboration; group work; inclusion; participation; social interdependence theory student; teacher
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-140674 (URN)10.1080/1034912X.2017.1363381 (DOI)2-s2.0-85028531105 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721 2012-5476
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council [721 2012-5476]

Available from: 2017-09-07 Created: 2017-09-07 Last updated: 2018-02-12Bibliographically approved
Hammar Chiriac, E., Rosander, M. & Wiggins, S. (2017). Forming groups: Enhancing psychological literacy through a group selection exercise. In: : . Paper presented at European Psychology Learning and Teaching, europlat, the Paris Lodron University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria, 18-20 September 2017..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Forming groups: Enhancing psychological literacy through a group selection exercise
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Social and group psychology has much to offer in terms of applicable knowledge and the development of psychological literacy in students. One area that is particularly suited for application is the formation of groups: how we select group members, and how we understand how group roles can impact on the effectiveness of group work. In light of many university courses using group work as part of teaching and learning activities, this is an ideal opportunity in which to apply psychological knowledge to the students’ own learning practices. This paper reports on the use of a group selection exercise as part of a social/group psychology course at Linköping University. The students are enrolled in the psychologist programme - a five-year educational programme that results in students becoming licensed psychologists – which uses problem-based learning (PBL) throughout its entirety. PBL is a pedagogical approach that is based on problem-solving, self-directed learning and group interaction. The group selection exercise involves: a lecture, the group-selection exercise (in which students must allocate themselves into groups of 6-8 people on the basis of their existing knowledge of group psychology theory), a whole-class reflection and finally a focused reflection on the task in their newly formed groups. This paper will report on each part of this task and will discuss how it enables students to put their understanding of group psychological theory into practice.

Keywords
psychological literacy, social pstchology, group psychology, group selection
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-141203 (URN)
Conference
European Psychology Learning and Teaching, europlat, the Paris Lodron University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria, 18-20 September 2017.
Available from: 2017-09-26 Created: 2017-09-26 Last updated: 2017-10-13Bibliographically approved
Forslund Frykedal, K. & Hammar Chiriac, E. (2017). To make the unknown known. Assessment in group work among students. Journal of Education Research, 10(2), 149-162
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To make the unknown known. Assessment in group work among students
2017 (English)In: Journal of Education Research, ISSN 1935-052X, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 149-162Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

When group work is used as pedagogical practice in compulsory schools, teachers are expected to assess each student’s individual knowledge even if learning has been gained in interaction with other students. This can be particularly challenge for teachers, i.e., the dilemma of reconciling the demands for individual assessment while fulfilling the demand to teach cooperation abilities through group work. Earlier studies concerning group work as classroom activity (Forslund Frykedal & Hammar Chiriac, 2010, 2011; Hammar Chiriac & Forslund Frykedal, 2011) reveal that assessment is a highly relevant but challenging factor when organising group work in educational settings. To our knowledge, assessment in group work is a rather neglected research area with very little attention being paid to research about this phenomenon. Previous research therefore provides little theoretical knowledge or useful tools to assist teachers in resolving these apparently conflicting demands. The main focus in this chapter is to present and elucidate our current knowledge about assessment in group work. Some of the aspects considered and problematized in this chapter are:

 

  • Purpose of the assessment;
  • What is assessed;
  • How the assessment is carried out;
  • Which level is in focus – individual level, group level or both;
  • How the feedback is implemented; and
  • Who is assessing – teacher, students or both.

 

Furthermore, an empirically grounded model with the purpose of clarifying different aspects of group assessment will be presented. Finally, the chapter is concluded with some pedagogical implications being suggested.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2017
Keywords
Group work; Group work assessment; Assessment; Students;
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-136826 (URN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2012-5476
Available from: 2017-04-27 Created: 2017-04-27 Last updated: 2017-05-11Bibliographically approved
Wiggins, S., Hammar Chiriac, E., Larsson Abbad, G., Pauli, R. & Worell, M. (2016). Ask Not Only ‘What Can Problem-Based Learning Do For Psychology?’ But ‘What Can Psychology Do For Problem-Based Learning?’ A Review of The Relevance of Problem-Based Learning For Psychology Teaching and Research. Psychology Learning & Teaching, 15(2), 136-154
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ask Not Only ‘What Can Problem-Based Learning Do For Psychology?’ But ‘What Can Psychology Do For Problem-Based Learning?’ A Review of The Relevance of Problem-Based Learning For Psychology Teaching and Research
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2016 (English)In: Psychology Learning & Teaching, ISSN 14757257, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 136-154Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Problem-based learning (PBL) is an internationally recognised pedagogical approach that is implemented within a number of disciplines. The relevance and uptake of PBL in psychology has to date, however,received very limited attention. The aim of this paper is therefore to review published accounts on how PBL is being used to deliver psychology curricula in higher education and to highlight psychological research that offers practical strategies for PBL theory and practice. The paper is divided into three sections. In the first, we discuss the principles of PBL and provide examples of how it can be used within psychology curricula, alongside a consideration of its advantages and disadvantages. In the second section,we outline the results of a systematic literature review of published examples of PBL used within psychology undergraduate and postgraduate courses. Finally, in the third section, we examine some of the ways in which psychological research can provide practical guidance for PBL teaching practice. We conclude this paper with some recommendations for future research across all these areas, and call forthe further development of PBL curricula in psychology higher education course provision.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage Publications, 2016
Keywords
Problem-based learning, psychology, teaching, research
National Category
Psychology Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129810 (URN)10.1177/1475725716643270 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-06-29 Created: 2016-06-28 Last updated: 2018-02-09
Wiggins, S., Hammar Chiriac, E., Larsson Abbad, G., Pauli, R. & Worell, M. (2016). PLAT 15(2) 2016: Introduction to the Special Issue on Problem-Based Learning and Psychology. Psychology Learning and Teaching, 15(2), 133-135
Open this publication in new window or tab >>PLAT 15(2) 2016: Introduction to the Special Issue on Problem-Based Learning and Psychology
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2016 (English)In: Psychology Learning and Teaching, ISSN 1475-7257, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 133-135Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage Publications, 2016
National Category
Psychology Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129827 (URN)10.1177/1475725716651213 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-06-29 Created: 2016-06-29 Last updated: 2017-04-15
Rosander, M. & Hammar Chiriac, E. (2016). The purpose of tutorial groups: Social influence, and the group as means and objective. Psychology Learning and Teaching, 15(2), 155-167
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The purpose of tutorial groups: Social influence, and the group as means and objective
2016 (English)In: Psychology Learning and Teaching, ISSN 14757257, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 155-167Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate how first-year students view the purpose of tutorial groups in PBL. In all, 147 students from 24 groups participated, providing 399 statements. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. The results showed a focus on both learning and social influence. Learning involved the tutorial as both an objective and as a means. Social influence is important for a tutorial to become a well-functioning group, together with opportunities to use the group as an objective in and of itself to learn to work in a group, cooperate, solve problems, and communicate. Social support and feelings of togetherness create conditions for intrinsic motivation, as well as stronger identification with the group. A tutorial group as a well-functioning learning environment requires both the group as an objective and as a means.

National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124306 (URN)10.1177/1475725716643269 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-01-26 Created: 2016-01-26 Last updated: 2018-01-30
Forslund Frykedal, K. & Hammar Chiriac, E. (2016). To make the unknown known: assessment in group work amongst students (1ed.). In: Dale Bowen (Ed.), Student learning: assessment, perceptions and strategies (pp. 61-79). Nova Science Publishers, Inc.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To make the unknown known: assessment in group work amongst students
2016 (English)In: Student learning: assessment, perceptions and strategies / [ed] Dale Bowen, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2016, 1, p. 61-79Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2016 Edition: 1
Series
Education in a Competitive and Globalizing World
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129899 (URN)9781634851527 (ISBN)9781634851305 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2012-5476
Available from: 2016-06-30 Created: 2016-06-30 Last updated: 2017-05-24Bibliographically approved
Hammar Chiriac, E. & Forslund Frykedal, K. (2015). Assessment of knowledge and abilities in cooperative learning. In: : . Paper presented at Cooperative Learning: Meeting the Challenges of the 21st Century, International Association for the Study of Cooperation in Education (IASCE) Conference, Odense, Denmark, October 1-3, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of knowledge and abilities in cooperative learning
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

When cooperative learning is used as pedagogical practice in Swedish compulsory schools teachers are expected to assess each student’s level of abilities in relation to knowledge requirements in the National Curriculum 2011. The request for individual assessment in addition to the demand of teaching collaboration abilities seems to be a challenge for teachers.

The aim of this project is to study assessment of knowledge and abilities in cooperative learning, but also if it is possible to train teachers’ and students ability to assess by use of education.

The study has an experimental longitudinal design with three experimental groups, randomly assigned to two different interventions or to a control group. Data are collected before, during and after the intervention, by means of several sources.

The main purpose of this presentation is to present some preliminary results based on analysis of interviews with teachers.

Preliminary results elucidate some of the teachers’ problems concerning assessment in cooperative learning as well as some pedagogical implications.  For both cooperative learning and assessment to function optimally it seems to be of vital importance that teachers have the necessary competence to construct clearly structured tasks, select abilities that are possible to assess but also have knowledge about how to assess these abilities during the group work.

This presentation summarises and elucidates an urgent and basic problem in the pedagogical practice that may generate knowledge of importance for teachers’ professional practice and further development of cooperative learning in the classroom.   

Abstract [en]

The aim of this project is to study assessment of knowledge and abilities in cooperative learning, and also study the possibility of training teachers’ and students’ assessment abilities.  Some preliminary results from the study will be presented and problematized.

Keywords
cooperative learning, group work, assessment
National Category
Pedagogical Work Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121859 (URN)
Conference
Cooperative Learning: Meeting the Challenges of the 21st Century, International Association for the Study of Cooperation in Education (IASCE) Conference, Odense, Denmark, October 1-3, 2015
Projects
Bedömning av kunskap och kompetens i grupparbete – en interventionsstudie i klassrummets vardagspraktik
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR 721-2012-5476
Available from: 2015-10-11 Created: 2015-10-11 Last updated: 2016-08-31Bibliographically approved
Swedberg, L., Michelsen, H., Hammar Chiriac, E. & Hylander, I. (2015). On-the-job training makes the difference: healthcare assistants perceived competence and responsibility in the care of patients with home mechanical ventilation. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 29(2), 369-378
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On-the-job training makes the difference: healthcare assistants perceived competence and responsibility in the care of patients with home mechanical ventilation
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 369-378Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ObjectivesTo describe and analyse perceived competence and perceived responsibility among healthcare assistants (HC assistants), caring for patients with home mechanical ventilation (HMV) and other advanced caring needs, adjusted for socio-demographic and workplace background factors. DesignA cross-sectional study was conducted including 128 HC assistants employed in Stockholm County, Sweden. MethodsThe HC assistants responded to a study-specific questionnaire on perceived competence and perceived responsibility, provided socio-demographic and workplace background data, as well as information on the patient characteristics for the understanding of their work situations. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were performed. ResultsEighty per cent of the HC assistants rated their perceived competence as high, and fifty-nine per cent rated their perceived responsibility as high. Fifty-five per cent lacked formal healthcare training, and only one in five of the HC assistants had a formal training equivalent with a licensed practical nurse (LPN) examination. Males lacked formal training to a greater extent than females and rated their competence accordingly. On-the-job training was significantly associated with high ratings on both perceived competence and perceived responsibility, and clinical supervision was associated with high rating on perceived responsibility. ConclusionsHC assistants with limited formal training self-reported their competence as high, and on-the-job training was found to be important. Also, clinical supervision was found important for their perception of high responsibility. In Sweden, HC assistants have a 24-hour responsibility for the care and safety of their patient with HMV and other advanced caring needs. The study results point out important issues for further research regarding formal training requirements as well as the needs for standardised workplace training and supervision of HC assistants. The consequences of transfer of responsibility by delegation from healthcare professionals to paraprofessionals within advanced home care also need further study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2015
Keywords
home mechanical ventilation (HMV); advanced home care; healthcare assistants; paraprofessionals; training needs; competence; responsibility
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-118849 (URN)10.1111/scs.12173 (DOI)000354260700020 ()25181407 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Stockholm County Council [20100060]; Karolinska Institutet [20100060]

Available from: 2015-06-08 Created: 2015-06-04 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Hammar Chiriac, E. & Forslund Frykedal, K. (2014). Assessment of knowledge and abilities when working in groups: An intervention study in everyday classroom practice. In: : . Paper presented at AARE-NZARE 2014, The joint converence between the Australian association for research in education and New Zealand association for research in education..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of knowledge and abilities when working in groups: An intervention study in everyday classroom practice
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114921 (URN)
Conference
AARE-NZARE 2014, The joint converence between the Australian association for research in education and New Zealand association for research in education.
Available from: 2015-03-05 Created: 2015-03-05 Last updated: 2016-08-31Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7117-5620

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