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Hammar Chiriac, E., Rosander, M. & Wiggins, S. (2018). Enhancing psychological literacy  through a group selection exercise. (2ed.). In: Jacquie Taylor. & Julie.A. Hulme (Ed.), International Edition of the Psychological Literacy Compendium: (pp. 10-12). Poole
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enhancing psychological literacy  through a group selection exercise.
2018 (English)In: International Edition of the Psychological Literacy Compendium / [ed] Jacquie Taylor. & Julie.A. Hulme, Poole , 2018, 2, p. 10-12Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Poole, 2018 Edition: 2
Keywords
Group psychology, Problem-based learning (PBL), Group work, Reflection
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150948 (URN)
Available from: 2018-09-05 Created: 2018-09-05 Last updated: 2018-09-19Bibliographically approved
Hammar Chiriac, E. & Einarsson, C. (2018). Gruppobservationer : Teori och praktik (3ed.). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gruppobservationer : Teori och praktik
2018 (Swedish)Book (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Gruppobservationer kan användas för att studera och förstå grupper och grupprocesser. Denna bok belyser gruppobservationer ur ett forskningsperspektiv. Med utgångspunkt i en teoretisk modell visas olika sätt att systematisera och beskriva olika former av gruppobservationer. Modellen bygger på två dimensioner. Den första dimensionen handlar om det förhållningssätt eller den kunskapssyn som ligger till grund för den aktuella studien. Dimensionen skiljer mellan begreppen teoriprövande och teorigenererande. Den andra dimensionen avser vilken grad av struktur observationen har. För att beskriva dimensionen används benämningarna hög respektive låg grad av struktur.

Modellens spännvidd och användbarhet visas genom att olika metoder för gruppobservationer presenteras. Därtill ges praktiska exempel på studier som författarna eller andra genomfört.

I denna tredje uppdaterade upplaga har teoridelen utökats och delarna om observatörsroller och etiska överväganden bearbetats.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018. p. 188 Edition: 3
Keywords
Grupper, Observation, Metod
National Category
Psychology Pedagogy Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150951 (URN)9789144121512 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-09-05 Created: 2018-09-05 Last updated: 2018-09-19Bibliographically approved
Vestergren, S., Drury, J. & Hammar Chiriac, E. (2018). How collective action produces psychological change and how that change endures over time: A case study of an environmental campaign.. British Journal of Social Psychology, 57(4), 855-877
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How collective action produces psychological change and how that change endures over time: A case study of an environmental campaign.
2018 (English)In: British Journal of Social Psychology, ISSN 0144-6665, E-ISSN 2044-8309, Vol. 57, no 4, p. 855-877Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous research on collective action has suggested that both intra- and intergroup interactions are important in producing psychological change. In this study, we examine how these two forms of interaction relate to each other over time. We present results from a longitudinal ethnographic study of participation in an environmental campaign, documenting endurance and prevalence of psychological change. Participants, locals (n = 14) and self-defined activists (n = 14), connected enduring psychological changes, such as changes in consumer behaviour and attitudes to their involvement in the environmental campaign. Thematic analysis of interviews suggested that participants linked the process of change to categorizing themselves in a new environmental-activist way that influenced their everyday lives beyond the immediate campaign. This recategorization was a result of a conflictual intergroup relationship with the police. The intergroup interaction produced supportive within-group relationships that facilitated the feasibility and sustainability of new world views that were maintained by staying active in the campaign. The data from the study support and extend previous research on collective action and are the basis of a model, suggesting that intragroup processes condition the effects of intergroup dynamics on sustained psychological change.less thanbr /greater than (© 2018 The Authors. British Journal of Social Psychology published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd on behalf of British Psychological Society.)

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
National Category
Social Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150964 (URN)10.1111/bjso.12270 (DOI)000446318700008 ()
Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2018-10-17
Forslund Frykedal, K. & Hammar Chiriac, E. (2018). Student Collaboration in Group Work: Inclusion as Participation. International journal of disability, development and education (2), 183-198
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Student Collaboration in Group Work: Inclusion as Participation
2018 (English)In: International journal of disability, development and education, ISSN 1034-912X, E-ISSN 1465-346X, no 2, p. 183-198Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Group work is an educational mode that promotes learning and socialisation among students. In this study, we focused on the inclusive processes when students work in small groups. The aim was to investigate and describe students’ inclusive and collaborative processes in group work and how the teacher supported or impeded these transactions. Social Interdependence Theory was utilised as the theoretical perspective overarching the study. The observational data employed were collected by video-recording group work. A part of Black-Hawkins framework of participation was used to define inclusion and for the analysis of inclusive and collaborative processes. The results suggest that students’ active participation in the discussions around the group work structures and analytical discussions, together with the teacher’s more defined feedback and avoidance of the traditional authoritative role, are examples of prerequisites for group work to be enacted in an inclusive manner.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
classroom; collaboration; group work; inclusion; participation; social interdependence theory student; teacher
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-140674 (URN)10.1080/1034912X.2017.1363381 (DOI)2-s2.0-85028531105 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721 2012-5476
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council [721 2012-5476]

Available from: 2017-09-07 Created: 2017-09-07 Last updated: 2018-02-12Bibliographically approved
Hammar Chiriac, E., Rosander, M. & Wiggins, S. (2017). Forming groups: Enhancing psychological literacy through a group selection exercise. In: : . Paper presented at European Psychology Learning and Teaching, europlat, the Paris Lodron University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria, 18-20 September 2017..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Forming groups: Enhancing psychological literacy through a group selection exercise
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Social and group psychology has much to offer in terms of applicable knowledge and the development of psychological literacy in students. One area that is particularly suited for application is the formation of groups: how we select group members, and how we understand how group roles can impact on the effectiveness of group work. In light of many university courses using group work as part of teaching and learning activities, this is an ideal opportunity in which to apply psychological knowledge to the students’ own learning practices. This paper reports on the use of a group selection exercise as part of a social/group psychology course at Linköping University. The students are enrolled in the psychologist programme - a five-year educational programme that results in students becoming licensed psychologists – which uses problem-based learning (PBL) throughout its entirety. PBL is a pedagogical approach that is based on problem-solving, self-directed learning and group interaction. The group selection exercise involves: a lecture, the group-selection exercise (in which students must allocate themselves into groups of 6-8 people on the basis of their existing knowledge of group psychology theory), a whole-class reflection and finally a focused reflection on the task in their newly formed groups. This paper will report on each part of this task and will discuss how it enables students to put their understanding of group psychological theory into practice.

Keywords
psychological literacy, social pstchology, group psychology, group selection
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-141203 (URN)
Conference
European Psychology Learning and Teaching, europlat, the Paris Lodron University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria, 18-20 September 2017.
Available from: 2017-09-26 Created: 2017-09-26 Last updated: 2017-10-13Bibliographically approved
Vestergren, S., Drury, J. & Hammar Chiriac, E. (2017). The biographical consequences of protest and activism: a systematic review and a new typology. Social Movement Studies, 16(2), 203-221
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The biographical consequences of protest and activism: a systematic review and a new typology
2017 (English)In: Social Movement Studies, ISSN 1474-2837, E-ISSN 1474-2829, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 203-221Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most research on activist participation has aimed to explain motives to engage in protest and collective action or becoming an activist. The outcomes, for the individual, have been neglected. Therefore, we set out to systematically document and organize the psychological and behavioural changes associated with activism into a typology of change. The review contains 57 papers describing changes. Psychological changes identified in the literature can be classified into 19 main forms: marital status, children, relationship ties, work-life/career, extended involvement, consumer behaviour, identity, empowerment, radicalization/politicization, legitimacy, sustained commitment, self-esteem, general well-being, traits, self-confidence, religion, organizing, knowledge and home skills. Our analysis highlights the lack of analysis of the relation between type of protest and type of change, and lack of research into the processes behind the various psychological changes. What is needed now is more precise investigation of the relationship between types of protests, social and psychological processes, and psychological outcomes. Further, more longitudinal studies are required to explore the relationship.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2017
Keywords
Protest; collective action; psychological change; activism; identity
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-136223 (URN)10.1080/14742837.2016.1252665 (DOI)000394663400004 ()
Available from: 2017-03-31 Created: 2017-03-31 Last updated: 2018-09-06
Forslund Frykedal, K. & Hammar Chiriac, E. (2017). To make the unknown known. Assessment in group work among students. Journal of Education Research, 10(2), 149-162
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To make the unknown known. Assessment in group work among students
2017 (English)In: Journal of Education Research, ISSN 1935-052X, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 149-162Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

When group work is used as pedagogical practice in compulsory schools, teachers are expected to assess each student’s individual knowledge even if learning has been gained in interaction with other students. This can be particularly challenge for teachers, i.e., the dilemma of reconciling the demands for individual assessment while fulfilling the demand to teach cooperation abilities through group work. Earlier studies concerning group work as classroom activity (Forslund Frykedal & Hammar Chiriac, 2010, 2011; Hammar Chiriac & Forslund Frykedal, 2011) reveal that assessment is a highly relevant but challenging factor when organising group work in educational settings. To our knowledge, assessment in group work is a rather neglected research area with very little attention being paid to research about this phenomenon. Previous research therefore provides little theoretical knowledge or useful tools to assist teachers in resolving these apparently conflicting demands. The main focus in this chapter is to present and elucidate our current knowledge about assessment in group work. Some of the aspects considered and problematized in this chapter are:

 

  • Purpose of the assessment;
  • What is assessed;
  • How the assessment is carried out;
  • Which level is in focus – individual level, group level or both;
  • How the feedback is implemented; and
  • Who is assessing – teacher, students or both.

 

Furthermore, an empirically grounded model with the purpose of clarifying different aspects of group assessment will be presented. Finally, the chapter is concluded with some pedagogical implications being suggested.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2017
Keywords
Group work; Group work assessment; Assessment; Students;
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-136826 (URN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2012-5476
Available from: 2017-04-27 Created: 2017-04-27 Last updated: 2017-05-11Bibliographically approved
Wiggins, S., Hammar Chiriac, E., Larsson Abbad, G., Pauli, R. & Worell, M. (2016). Ask Not Only ‘What Can Problem-Based Learning Do For Psychology?’ But ‘What Can Psychology Do For Problem-Based Learning?’ A Review of The Relevance of Problem-Based Learning For Psychology Teaching and Research. Psychology Learning & Teaching, 15(2), 136-154
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ask Not Only ‘What Can Problem-Based Learning Do For Psychology?’ But ‘What Can Psychology Do For Problem-Based Learning?’ A Review of The Relevance of Problem-Based Learning For Psychology Teaching and Research
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2016 (English)In: Psychology Learning & Teaching, ISSN 14757257, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 136-154Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Problem-based learning (PBL) is an internationally recognised pedagogical approach that is implemented within a number of disciplines. The relevance and uptake of PBL in psychology has to date, however,received very limited attention. The aim of this paper is therefore to review published accounts on how PBL is being used to deliver psychology curricula in higher education and to highlight psychological research that offers practical strategies for PBL theory and practice. The paper is divided into three sections. In the first, we discuss the principles of PBL and provide examples of how it can be used within psychology curricula, alongside a consideration of its advantages and disadvantages. In the second section,we outline the results of a systematic literature review of published examples of PBL used within psychology undergraduate and postgraduate courses. Finally, in the third section, we examine some of the ways in which psychological research can provide practical guidance for PBL teaching practice. We conclude this paper with some recommendations for future research across all these areas, and call forthe further development of PBL curricula in psychology higher education course provision.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage Publications, 2016
Keywords
Problem-based learning, psychology, teaching, research
National Category
Psychology Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129810 (URN)10.1177/1475725716643270 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-06-29 Created: 2016-06-28 Last updated: 2018-02-09
Wiggins, S., Hammar Chiriac, E., Larsson Abbad, G., Pauli, R. & Worell, M. (2016). PLAT 15(2) 2016: Introduction to the Special Issue on Problem-Based Learning and Psychology. Psychology Learning and Teaching, 15(2), 133-135
Open this publication in new window or tab >>PLAT 15(2) 2016: Introduction to the Special Issue on Problem-Based Learning and Psychology
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2016 (English)In: Psychology Learning and Teaching, ISSN 1475-7257, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 133-135Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage Publications, 2016
National Category
Psychology Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129827 (URN)10.1177/1475725716651213 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-06-29 Created: 2016-06-29 Last updated: 2017-04-15
Rosander, M. & Hammar Chiriac, E. (2016). The purpose of tutorial groups: Social influence, and the group as means and objective. Psychology Learning and Teaching, 15(2), 155-167
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The purpose of tutorial groups: Social influence, and the group as means and objective
2016 (English)In: Psychology Learning and Teaching, ISSN 14757257, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 155-167Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate how first-year students view the purpose of tutorial groups in PBL. In all, 147 students from 24 groups participated, providing 399 statements. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. The results showed a focus on both learning and social influence. Learning involved the tutorial as both an objective and as a means. Social influence is important for a tutorial to become a well-functioning group, together with opportunities to use the group as an objective in and of itself to learn to work in a group, cooperate, solve problems, and communicate. Social support and feelings of togetherness create conditions for intrinsic motivation, as well as stronger identification with the group. A tutorial group as a well-functioning learning environment requires both the group as an objective and as a means.

National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124306 (URN)10.1177/1475725716643269 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-01-26 Created: 2016-01-26 Last updated: 2018-01-30
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7117-5620

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