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Svanvik, Joar
Publications (10 of 44) Show all publications
Felldin, M., Ekberg, J., Polanska‐Tamborek, D., Hansson, U., Sender, M., Rizell, M., . . . Mölne, J. (2016). Donor monoclonal gammopathy may cause lymphoproliferative disorders in solid organ transplant recipients. American Journal of Transplantation, 16(9), 2676-2683
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Donor monoclonal gammopathy may cause lymphoproliferative disorders in solid organ transplant recipients
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2016 (English)In: American Journal of Transplantation, ISSN 1600-6135, E-ISSN 1600-6143, American Journal of transplantation, Vol. 16, no 9, p. 2676-2683Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Prior research on donor monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) has been inadequate regarding the risk for lymphoproliferative disease in solid organ transplantation recipients. Seven organ recipients from two different donors developed lymphoproliferative disease. The origin of the malignancy was determined by use of microsatellite analysis, and the plasma of the two donors was analyzed with the use of electrophoresis. The clinical courses of the seven recipients were followed for 36–60 months. One donor transmitted lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma to two kidney recipients and MGUS to a liver recipient, all IgMκ. A second donor caused IgGλ myeloma in two kidney and one liver recipient, and IgGλ gammopathy in a heart recipient. Transplant nephrectomy was performed in three kidney recipients and remission was achieved. The fourth kidney recipient has kept the graft and the disease has progressed. The liver recipient died from myeloma. There were no clinical signs of lymphoproliferative disease in the donors, but retrospective serum analyses showed M‐components, IgMκ (37 g/L) and IgGλ (8 g/L). Donors with MGUS may cause donor‐transmitted malignancies via passenger lymphocytes/plasma cells in solid organ recipients. The results call for a large register study of the incidence of donor MGUS and lymphoproliferative disease in their recipients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2016
National Category
Urology and Nephrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-162682 (URN)10.1111/ajt.13804 (DOI)000383774700022 ()27575725 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84984622163 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-12-16 Created: 2019-12-16 Last updated: 2020-01-07Bibliographically approved
Shabo, I., Olsson, H., Elkarim, R., Sun, X.-F. & Svanvik, J. (2014). Macrophage Infiltration in Tumor Stroma is Related to Tumor Cell Expression of CD163 in Colorectal Cancer. Cancer Microenvironment, 7(1), 61-69
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Macrophage Infiltration in Tumor Stroma is Related to Tumor Cell Expression of CD163 in Colorectal Cancer
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2014 (English)In: Cancer Microenvironment, ISSN 1875-2292, E-ISSN 1875-2284, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 61-69Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The scavenger receptor, CD163, is a macrophage-specific marker. Recent studies have shown that CD163 expression in breast and rectal cancer cells is associated with poor prognosis. This study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between CD163 expression as a macrophage trait in cancer cells, and macrophage infiltration and its clinical significance in colorectal cancer. Immunostaining of CD163 and macrophage infiltration were evaluated in paraffin-embedded specimens, earlier analyzed for CD31, D2-40 and S-phase fraction, from primary tumors and normal colorectal mucosa of 75 patients with colorectal carcinoma. The outcomes were analyzed in relation to clinical-pathological data. CD163 expression was positive in cancer cells in 20 % of colorectal cancer patients and was related to advanced tumor stages (P = 0.008) and unfavorable prognosis (p = 0.001). High macrophage infiltration was related to shorter survival and positive CD163 expression in tumor cells. The prognostic impact of macrophage infiltration was independent of tumor stage and CD163 expression in cancer cells (p = 0.034). The expression of macrophage phenotype in colorectal cancer cells is associated with macrophage density in tumor stroma and lower survival rates. Macrophage infiltration has an independent prognostic impact on mortality in colorectal cancer. In accordance with previous experimental studies, these findings provide new insights into the role of macrophages in colorectal cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2014
Keywords
CD163 expression, Macrophage infiltration, Colorectal cancer
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-106894 (URN)10.1007/s12307-014-0145-7 (DOI)24771466 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-05-23 Created: 2014-05-23 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Eldh, M., Olofsson Bagge, R., Lässer, C., Svanvik, J., Sjöstrand, M., Mattsson, J., . . . Lötvall, J. (2014). MicroRNA in exosomes isolated directly from the liver circulation in patients with metastatic uveal melanoma. BMC Cancer, 14(962), 1-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>MicroRNA in exosomes isolated directly from the liver circulation in patients with metastatic uveal melanoma
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2014 (English)In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 14, no 962, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Uveal melanoma is a tumour arising from melanocytes of the eye, and 30 per cent of these patients develop liver metastases. Exosomes are small RNA containing nano-vesicles released by most cells, including malignant melanoma cells. This clinical translational study included patients undergoing isolated hepatic perfusion (IHP) for metastatic uveal melanoma, from whom exosomes were isolated directly from liver perfusates. The objective was to determine whether exosomes are present in the liver circulation, and to ascertain whether these may originate from melanoma cells.

METHODS:

Exosomes were isolated from the liver perfusate of twelve patients with liver metastases from uveal melanoma undergoing IHP. Exosomes were visualised by electron microscopy, and characterised by flow cytometry, Western blot and real-time PCR. Furthermore, the concentration of peripheral blood exosomes were measured and compared to healthy controls.

RESULTS:

The liver perfusate contained Melan-A positive and RNA containing exosomes, with similar miRNA profiles among patients, but dissimilar miRNA compared to exosomes isolated from tumor cell cultures. Patients with metastatic uveal melanoma had a higher concentration of exosomes in their peripheral venous blood compared to healthy controls.

CONCLUSIONS:

Melanoma exosomes are released into the liver circulation in metastatic uveal melanoma, and is associated with higher concentrations of exosomes in the systemic circulation. The exosomes isolated directly from liver circulation contain miRNA clusters that are different from exosomes from other cellular sources.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BioMed Central, 2014
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Dermatology and Venereal Diseases Cell and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126013 (URN)10.1186/1471-2407-14-962 (DOI)25510783 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-11 Created: 2016-03-11 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Shabo, I., Olsson, H., Stål, O. & Svanvik, J. (2013). Breast Cancer Expression of DAP12 is Associated With Skeletal and Liver Metastases and Poor Survival. Clinical Breast Cancer, 13(5), 371-377
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Breast Cancer Expression of DAP12 is Associated With Skeletal and Liver Metastases and Poor Survival
2013 (English)In: Clinical Breast Cancer, ISSN 1526-8209, E-ISSN 1938-0666, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 371-377Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Macrophages are an important cellular factor in breast cancer (BRC) progression and metastasis. DNAX activating protein of 12 kD (DAP12) is essential factor for macrophage fusion function. This study was conducted to investigate the expression and significance of DAP12 expression in BRC. DAP12 is expressed in BRC cells and associated with poor survival, liver metastases, and bone metastases. These data provide new insight into the pathophysiology of macrophages in BRC. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanBackground: The transmembrane adapter protein, DAP12, transduces activation signals for several arrays of receptors, including human signal-regulatory protein, DAP12-associating lectin-1, triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1, -2, and -3, in natural killer cells, granulocytes, monocytes/macrophages, and dendritic cells. The macrophage-specific antigen, Cluster of Differentiation 163 (CD163), is expressed in breast and colorectal cancers and is associated with early cancer recurrence and poor prognosis. It was recently shown that fusion between intestinal tumor cells and macrophages results in nuclear reprogramming with hybrid transcripts from both cells of origin. The role of DAP12 in the fusion process is not known. This study investigates the expression of DAP12 in BRC cells, and its relation to other macrophage traits and to the clinical progression of disease. Materials and Methods: Immunostaining of DAP12 and CD163 was performed and evaluated in paraffin-embedded specimens from 132 patients with BRC. The outcomes were analyzed in relation to clinicopathological data. Results: DAP12 expression in cancer cells was positive in 66 percent of the cancers and was associated with high tumor grade (P = .015), and with liver (P = .047) and skeletal (P = .067), but not with lung metastases (P = 1.00). Patients with BRC expressing DAP12 had poor prognosis, with higher recurrence rates of skeletal (P = .018) and liver metastases (P = .047), and shorter survival time (P = .0060). Conclusion: We suggest that macrophage traits in BRC cells facilitate the metastatic process and that DAP12 expression might promote metastatic homing to bone and liver tissues.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
Cell fusion, Tumor-associated macrophages, Tissue-specific metastasis, Tumor immunology, Tumor microenvironment
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-98662 (URN)10.1016/j.clbc.2013.05.003 (DOI)000324341600010 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland||

Available from: 2013-10-10 Created: 2013-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Shabo, I. & Svanvik, J. (2011). Expression of Macrophage Antigens by Tumor Cells. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, 714, 141-150
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expression of Macrophage Antigens by Tumor Cells
2011 (English)In: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0065-2598, E-ISSN 2214-8019, Vol. 714, p. 141-150Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Macrophages are a heterogeneous cell population of the myeloid linage derived from monocytes. These cells show two different polarization states, M1 and M2 macrophages in response to different micro environmental signals. Tumor associated macrophages (TAM) represent the M2 type and promote tumor progression. These cells express antigens that more or less are specific for macrophages like: CD14, CD68, MAC387, CD 163, and DAP12. In a series of recent studies it is shown that cancer cells may express these antigens and CD I 63, MAC387 and DAP12 may be expressed by e.g. breast cancer cells. Thus, 48% of the breast cancers expressed CD163 that is a scavenger receptor normally expressed by macrophages alone. The corresponding figure for rectal cancer is 31%. The expression of CD163 is correlated to early distant recurrence in breast cancer and local recurrence in rectal cancer and reduced survival time in both conditions. Expression of macrophage antigens in breast- and colorectal-cancers may have a prognostic relevance in clinical praxis. One explanation to these findings is that resemblance with macrophages may indicate a more invasive phenotype due to genetic exchange between the primary tumor cells and associated macrophages. This is further supported by the finding that expression of DAP12, a macrophage fusion receptor, in breast cancer is associated with an advanced tumor grade and higher rates of skeletal and liver metastases and overall shorter distant recurrence free survival. Another explanation to the changed phenotype is a genetic exchange between the cells by exosome-mediated transfer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2011
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-68824 (URN)10.1007/978-94-007-0782-5_7 (DOI)000290775400007 ()
Available from: 2011-06-08 Created: 2011-06-08 Last updated: 2017-12-11
Källström, R., Hjertberg, H. & Svanvik, J. (2010). Construct validity of a full procedure, virtual reality, real-time, simulation model for training in transurethral resection of the prostate.. Journal of endourology / Endourological Society, 24(1), 109-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Construct validity of a full procedure, virtual reality, real-time, simulation model for training in transurethral resection of the prostate.
2010 (English)In: Journal of endourology / Endourological Society, ISSN 1557-900X, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 109-15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To examine the content and construct validity of a full procedure transurethral prostate resection simulation model (PelvicVision). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The full procedure simulator consisted of a modified resectoscope connected to a robotic arm with haptic feedback, foot pedals, and a standard desktop computer. The simulation calculated the flow of irrigation fluid, the amount of bleeding, the corresponding blood fog, the resectoscope movements, resection volumes, use of current, and blood loss. Eleven medical students and nine clinically experienced urologists filled in questionnaires regarding previous experiences, performance evaluation, and their opinion of the usefulness of the simulator after performing six (students) and three (urologists) full procedures with different levels of difficulty. Their performance was evaluated using a checklist. RESULTS: The urologists finished the procedures in half the time as the students with the same resection volume and blood loss but with fewer serious perforations of the prostatic capsule and/or sphincter area and less irrigation fluid uptake. The resectoscope tip movement was longer and the irrigation fluid uptake per resected volume was about 5 times higher for the students. The students showed a positive learning curve in most variables. CONCLUSION: There is proof of construct validity and good content validation for this full procedure simulator for training in transurethral resection of the prostate. The simulator could be used in the early training of urology residents without risk of negative outcome.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-53081 (URN)10.1089/end.2009.0114 (DOI)19961333 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-01-15 Created: 2010-01-15 Last updated: 2010-03-17
Wallin, Å., Francis, P., Nilbert, N., Svanvik, J. & Sun, X.-F. (2010). Gene expression profile of colon cancer cell lines treated with SN-38. Chemotherapy, 56(1), 17-25
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gene expression profile of colon cancer cell lines treated with SN-38
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2010 (English)In: Chemotherapy, ISSN 0009-3157, E-ISSN 1421-9794, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 17-25Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: Colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer in the industrialcountries. Due to advances regarding the treatments, primarily development ofimproved surgical methods, and the ability to make the earlier diagnosis, the mortalityhas remained constant during the past decades even though the incidence in fact hasincreased. To improve chemotherapy and enable personalised treatment, the need ofbiomarkers is of great significance. In this study we evaluated the gene expressionprofiles of the colon cancer cell lines treated with SN-38, the active metabolite oftopoisomerase-1 inhibitor irinotecan which leads to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.Material and Methods: The study included three colon cancer cell lines KM12C,KM12SM and KM12l4a. The three cell lines were treated with SN-38, and sampleswere obtained after 24 and 48 hour treatments. The gene expression analyses wereperformed using oligonucleotide microarrays comprising of ~27,000 spots where theuntreated controls were compared to the SN-38 treated samples. Results: Unsupervisedclustering clearly distinguished the treated cell lines from the untreated. Supervisedanalysis identified 3974 significant genes (p=0.05) differentiating the treated samplesfrom the untreated, majority of which were downregulated after treatment. The toprankeddownregulated genes in the treated cell lines included those related to receptorand kinase activity, signal transduction, apoptosis, RNA processing, protein metabolismand transport, cell cycle and transcription. A smaller number of genes were upregulatedin the cell lines after treatment and included genes involved in apoptosis, transcription,development and differentiation. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that theexpression of the genes involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis as well as RNA,DNA and protein metabolism were affected by SN-38. The impact of certain genes oncolorectal cancer development needs to be further evaluated, however these resultscould serve as a basis for further studies in order to find targets for irinotecan treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
S. Karger AG, 2010
Keywords
Colorectal, oncology, cancer
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14788 (URN)10.1159/000287353 (DOI)000276593500003 ()
Note
Original Publication: Åsa Wallin, P. Francis, N. Nilbert, Joar Svanvik and Xiao-Feng Sun, Gene expression profile of colon cancer cell lines treated with SN-38, 2010, Chemotherapy, (56), 1, 17-25. http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000287353 Copyright: S. Karger AG http://www.karger.com/ Available from: 2008-09-24 Created: 2008-09-24 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Källström, R., Hjertberg, H. & Svanvik, J. (2010). Impact of Virtual Reality-Simulated Training on Urology Residents Performance of Transurethral Resection of the Prostate. Journal of endourology, 24(9), 1521-5128
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of Virtual Reality-Simulated Training on Urology Residents Performance of Transurethral Resection of the Prostate
2010 (English)In: Journal of endourology, ISSN 0892-7790, E-ISSN 1557-900X, Vol. 24, no 9, p. 1521-5128Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There are today a number of VR-simulators for practicing the TURP procedure, but few data on the effect of training on surgical performance.

Objective: To test if practicing the TURP procedure in a VR-simulator increases the skills and dexterity of urology residents when performing the procedure on patients. Design, setting and participants Twenty-four urology residents attended a five-day course on diagnosis and treatment of benign prostatic enlargement. Each of the residents did three video-recorded TURP procedures on patients.

Intervention: Between two of the procedures the residents underwent criterion-based practice in a TURP simulator (PelvicVision).

Measurements: The TURP procedure was peroperatively evaluated using objective structured assessment of technical skills (OSATS). The video-recordings of the procedures were analyzed on a minute to minute basis regarding the main action during that minute, if that action was successful, and errors.

Results and Limitations: The participating residents rated patient safety as high, they believed they learned most from the real operations, and they gained knowledge about both the procedure and the instrumentation used. The mean practice time in the simulator was 198 minutes before reaching the criterion level. Comparison of the first and last TURP procedures showed an increase in autonomous operation time and in successful actions and a decrease in hemostasis time without increased blood loss. The proportion of residents believed able to perform a simple TURP procedure increased from 10% to about 75%. OSATSscores and self-evaluations were significantly improved. The scores increased significantly more with than without simulator practice. The patient follow-up showed no increased risks or poorer results regarding micturition.

Conclusions: Practice in a simulator based environment improves the skills and dexterity of urology residents when performing the procedure on patients, without increased risks or poorer results for the patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., 2010
Keywords
Prostate, transurethral resection of prostate, computer simulation, education, medical, task performance and analysis
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-54462 (URN)10.1089/end.2009.0667 (DOI)000281864700026 ()
Available from: 2010-03-17 Created: 2010-03-17 Last updated: 2017-12-12
Shabo, I., Olsson, H., Sun, X.-F. & Svanvik, J. (2009). Expression of the macrophage antigen CD163 in rectal cancer cells is associated with early local recurrence and reduced survival time.. International journal of cancer. Journal international du cancer, 125(8), 1826-1831
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expression of the macrophage antigen CD163 in rectal cancer cells is associated with early local recurrence and reduced survival time.
2009 (English)In: International journal of cancer. Journal international du cancer, ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 125, no 8, p. 1826-1831Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Expression of the macrophage antigen CD163 in breast cancer cells is recently shown to be related to early distant recurrence and shortened survival. In this study, 163 patients with rectal cancer, included in the Swedish rectal cancer trial and followed up for a median of 71 months, were examined for the expression of CD163 in the primary tumors. The cancer cells expressed CD163 in the primary tumors in 23% (n = 32) of the patients. In pretreatment biopsies from 101 patients, 10 had CD163-positive cancers and these patients had earlier local recurrence (p < 0.044) and reduced survival time (p < 0.045) compared with those with CD163-negative tumors. When studying surgical specimens from 61 patients randomized to preoperative irradiation (5 x 5 Gy delivered in 1 week), it was found that 31% were CD163 positive whereas the corresponding figure was only 17% for 78 patients who were nonirradiated (p < 0.044), which tentatively may be consistent with X-rays inducing fusion. In CD163-positive tumors there was a reduced apoptotic activity as measured with the Termina deoxynucleotidyl Transferase Biotin-dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL) technique (p = 0.018). There tended also to be an increased proliferation activity measured as an expression of Ki-67 non significant (NS). It is concluded that primary rectal cancers may express CD-163, and this phenotypic macrophage trait is related to early local recurrence, shorter survival time and reduced apoptosis. Furthermore, the expression of CD163 is more common after irradiation.

Keywords
rectal cancer • macrophages • metastasis • survival • cell fusion • radiotherapy
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-21408 (URN)10.1002/ijc.24506 (DOI)19582880 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-10-01 Created: 2009-10-01 Last updated: 2010-04-14
Winbladh, A., Sandström, P., Olsson, H., Svanvik, J. & Gullstrand, P. (2009). Segmental ischemia of the liver - microdialysis in a novel porcine model.. European surgical research. Europäische chirurgische Forschung. Recherches chirurgicales européennes, 43(3), 276-285
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Segmental ischemia of the liver - microdialysis in a novel porcine model.
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2009 (English)In: European surgical research. Europäische chirurgische Forschung. Recherches chirurgicales européennes, ISSN 1421-9921, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 276-285Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Segmental liver ischemia is often used in rodents to study ischemia and reperfusion injuries (IRI). There are no reports of protocols using segmental ischemia in porcine models. Microdialysis (MD) provides the opportunity to study local effects of IRI in vivo. METHODS: Eight pigs received an MD catheter placed in liver segments IV and V, respectively. All circulation to segment IV was stopped for 80 min, and reperfusion was followed for 240 min. RESULTS: During ischemia the levels of lactate, glycerol and glucose increased 3-fold (p < 0.001), 40-fold (p < 0.001) and 4-fold (p < 0.01), respectively, in the ischemic segment compared to the perfused segment, whereas the levels of pyruvate fell to a tenth of the preischemic level (p < 0.001). All values returned to baseline after reperfusion. Serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase increased (p < 0.05). Polymorphonuclear cells increased in both segments, although the density was significantly higher in segment IV. CONCLUSION: Clamping of one liver segment in pigs is a simple, stable and reproducible model to study IRI with minimal systemic effects. MD revealed no signs of anaerobic metabolism in the perfused segment but still there was an increase in the number of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in this segment, although it was lower than that in the ischemic segment.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-21350 (URN)10.1159/000230675 (DOI)19641322 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-10-01 Created: 2009-10-01 Last updated: 2011-05-26
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