liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Shabo, Ivan
Publications (10 of 16) Show all publications
Aljabery, F., Olsson, H., Gimm, O., Jahnson, S. & Shabo, I. (2018). M2-macrophage infiltration and macrophage traits of tumor cells in urinary bladder cancer. Urologic Oncology, 36(4), Article ID 159.e19.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>M2-macrophage infiltration and macrophage traits of tumor cells in urinary bladder cancer
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Urologic Oncology, ISSN 1078-1439, E-ISSN 1873-2496, Vol. 36, no 4, article id 159.e19Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) constitute a subset of nonneoplastic cells in tumor stroma and influence cancer progression in solid tumors. The clinical significance of TAMs in urinary bladder cancer(UBC) is controversial.

Methods

We prospectively studied 103 patients with stage pT1–T4 UBC treated with cystectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. Tumor sections were immunostained with M2-specific macrophage marker CD163 and proliferation marker Ki-67. The expression of these markers in cancer cells as well as macrophage infiltration (MI) in tumor stroma was analyzed in relation to clinical data and outcome.

Results

The mean rate of CD163 and Ki-67 expressed by cancer cells were 35% and 78%, respectively. With borderline significance, MI was associated with lower rate of lymph node metastasis (P = 0.06). CD163 expression in cancer cells was proportional to MI (P<0.014). Patients with CD163-positive tumors and strong MI had significantly longer cancer-specific survival (CSS) (76 months), compared to patient with CD163-positive tumors and weak MI (28 months) (P = 0.02).

Conclusions

M2-specific MI tends to be inversely correlated with LN metastasis and improved CSS in UBC. MI might have protective impact in CD163-positive tumors. Expression of CD163 in cancer cells is significantly correlated with MI and might have a tumor promoting impact.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Bladder cancer; Tumor-associated macrophages; Lymph node metastasis; Ki-67; CD163; Macrophage traits in tumor cells
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-147811 (URN)10.1016/j.urolonc.2017.11.020 (DOI)000429902600013 ()29288002 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85039047709 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies|FoU research grant from the County Council of Ostergotland, Linkoping, Sweden; ALF research grant from the County Council of Ostergotland, Linkoping, Sweden

Available from: 2018-05-17 Created: 2018-05-17 Last updated: 2018-05-24Bibliographically approved
Haj-Hosseini, N., Petersson, P., Gimm, O. & Shabo, I. (2016). Optical Coherence Tomography for Pathological Analysis of Thyroid. In: : . Paper presented at SPIE Photonics West, 16 - 18-February 2016 San Francisco, California, United States. San Francisco
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Optical Coherence Tomography for Pathological Analysis of Thyroid
2016 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
San Francisco: , 2016
National Category
Medical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126690 (URN)
Conference
SPIE Photonics West, 16 - 18-February 2016 San Francisco, California, United States
Funder
Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS)Linköpings universitet
Available from: 2016-04-01 Created: 2016-04-01 Last updated: 2018-04-25
Shabo, I., Midtbö, K. M., Andersson, H., Åkerlund, E., Olsson, H., Wegman, P., . . . Lindström, A. (2015). Macrophage traits in cancer cells are induced by macrophage-cancer cell fusion and cannot be explained by cellular interaction. BMC Cancer, 15(1), 922
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Macrophage traits in cancer cells are induced by macrophage-cancer cell fusion and cannot be explained by cellular interaction
Show others...
2015 (English)In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 922-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Cell fusion is a natural process in normal development and tissue regeneration. Fusion between cancer cells and macrophages generates metastatic hybrids with genetic and phenotypic characteristics from both maternal cells. However, there are no clinical markers for detecting cell fusion in clinical context. Macrophage-specific antigen CD163 expression in tumor cells is reported in breast and colorectal cancers and proposed being caused by macrophages-cancer cell fusion in tumor stroma. The purpose of this study is to examine the cell fusion process as a biological explanation for macrophage phenotype in breast. Methods: Monocytes, harvested from male blood donor, were activated to M2 macrophages and co-cultured in ThinCert transwell system with GFP-labeled MCF-7 cancer cells. MCF7/macrophage hybrids were generated by spontaneous cell fusion, isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and confirmed by fluorescence microscopy, short tandem repeats analysis and flow cytometry. CD163 expression was evaluated in breast tumor samples material from 127 women by immunohistochemistry. Results: MCF-7/macrophage hybrids were generated spontaneously at average rate of 2 % and showed phenotypic and genetic traits from both maternal cells. CD163 expression in MCF-7 cells could not be induced by paracrine interaction with M2-activated macrophages. CD163 positive cancer cells in tumor sections grew in clonal collection and a cutoff point greater than25 % of positive cancer cells was significantly correlated to disease free and overall survival. Conclusions: In conclusion, macrophage traits in breast cancer might be caused by cell fusion rather than explained by paracrine cellular interaction. These data provide new insights into the role of cell fusion in breast cancer and contributes to the development of clinical markers to identify cell fusion.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BIOMED CENTRAL LTD, 2015
Keywords
Cell fusion; Macrophages; Paracrine cellular interaction; Tumor markers
National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123328 (URN)10.1186/s12885-015-1935-0 (DOI)000365276000001 ()26585897 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland (Sweden); National Organization of Breast Cancer Associations (Sweden); Bengt Ihre Foundation (Swedish Surgical Society)

Available from: 2015-12-14 Created: 2015-12-11 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Haj-Hosseini, N., Stepp, H., Markwardt, N., Gimm, O. & Shabo, I. (2015). Optical biopsy during thyroid and parathyroid surgery. In: : . Paper presented at European Conferences on Biomedical Optics, Munich, Germany, 21-25 June. Munich: SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Optical biopsy during thyroid and parathyroid surgery
Show others...
2015 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Munich: SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2015
Keywords
optical coherence tomography, autofluorescene, thyroid, parathyroid
National Category
Other Medical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-118520 (URN)
Conference
European Conferences on Biomedical Optics, Munich, Germany, 21-25 June
Funder
Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS)
Available from: 2015-05-29 Created: 2015-05-29 Last updated: 2018-04-25Bibliographically approved
Aljabery, F., Lindblom, G., Skoog, S., Shabo, I., Olsson, H., Rosell, J. & Jahnson, S. (2015). PET/CT versus conventional CT for detection of lymph node metastases in patients with locally advanced bladder cancer.. BMC urology, 15(1), 87
Open this publication in new window or tab >>PET/CT versus conventional CT for detection of lymph node metastases in patients with locally advanced bladder cancer.
Show others...
2015 (English)In: BMC urology, ISSN 1471-2490, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 87-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: We studied patients treated with radical cystectomy for locally advanced bladder cancer to compare the results of both preoperative positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and conventional CT with the findings of postoperative histopathological evaluation of lymph nodes.

METHODS: Patients who had bladder cancer and were candidates for cystectomy underwent preoperative PET/CT using 18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and conventional CT. The results regarding lymph node involvement were independently evaluated by two experienced radiologists and were subsequently compared with histopathology results, the latter of which were reassessed by an experienced uropathologist (HO).

RESULTS: There were 54 evaluable patients (mean age 68 years, 47 [85 %] males and 7 [15 %] females) with pT and pN status as follows: < pT2-14 (26 %), pT2-10 (18 %), and > pT2-30 (56 %); pN0 37 (69 %) and pN+ 17 (31 %). PET/CT showed positive lymph nodes in 12 patients (22 %), and 7 of those cases were confirmed by histopathology; the corresponding results for conventional CT were 11 (20 %) and 7 patients (13 %), respectively. PET/CT had 41 % sensitivity, 86 % specificity, 58 % PPV, and 76 % NPV, whereas the corresponding figures for conventional CT were 41 %, 89 %, 64 %, and 77 %. Additional analyses of the right and left side of the body or in specified anatomical regions gave similar results.

CONCLUSIONS: In this study, PET/CT and conventional CT had similar low sensitivity in detecting and localizing regional lymph node metastasis in bladder cancer.

National Category
Urology and Nephrology Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120796 (URN)10.1186/s12894-015-0080-z (DOI)000359832000001 ()26294219 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-08-25 Created: 2015-08-25 Last updated: 2017-05-17
Haj-Hosseini, N., Behm, P., Shabo, I. & Wårdell, K. (2014). Fluorescence spectroscopy using indocyanine green for lymph node mapping. In: : . Paper presented at Advanced Biomedical and Clinical Diagnostic and Surgical Guidance Systems XII, 2-4 February 2014, San Francisco, California, USA (pp. 1-6). , 8935(893504)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fluorescence spectroscopy using indocyanine green for lymph node mapping
2014 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The principles of cancer treatment has for years been radical resection of the primary tumor. In the oncologic surgeries where the affected cancer site is close to the lymphatic system, it is as important to detect the draining lymph nodes for metastasis (lymph node mapping). As a replacement for conventional radioactive labeling, indocyanine green (ICG) has shown successful results in lymph node mapping; however, most of the ICG fluorescence detection techniques developed are based on camera imaging. In this work, fluorescence spectroscopy using a fiber-optical probe was evaluated on a tissue-like ICG phantom with ICG concentrations of 6-64 μM and on breast tissue from five patients. Fiber-optical based spectroscopy was able to detect ICG fluorescence at low intensities; therefore, it is expected to increase the detection threshold of the conventional imaging systems when used intraoperatively. The probe allows spectral characterization of the fluorescence and navigation in the tissue as opposed to camera imaging which is limited to the view on the surface of the tissue

Keywords
Intra-operative optical imaging, near infrared fluorescence, breast cancer surgery, optical phantom, optimal ICG concentration, spectroscopy
National Category
Medical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-98988 (URN)10.1117/12.2036765 (DOI)000335493700002 ()9780819498489 (ISBN)
Conference
Advanced Biomedical and Clinical Diagnostic and Surgical Guidance Systems XII, 2-4 February 2014, San Francisco, California, USA
Available from: 2013-10-14 Created: 2013-10-14 Last updated: 2019-01-23Bibliographically approved
Shabo, I., Olsson, H., Elkarim, R., Sun, X.-F. & Svanvik, J. (2014). Macrophage Infiltration in Tumor Stroma is Related to Tumor Cell Expression of CD163 in Colorectal Cancer. Cancer Microenvironment, 7(1), 61-69
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Macrophage Infiltration in Tumor Stroma is Related to Tumor Cell Expression of CD163 in Colorectal Cancer
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Cancer Microenvironment, ISSN 1875-2292, E-ISSN 1875-2284, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 61-69Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The scavenger receptor, CD163, is a macrophage-specific marker. Recent studies have shown that CD163 expression in breast and rectal cancer cells is associated with poor prognosis. This study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between CD163 expression as a macrophage trait in cancer cells, and macrophage infiltration and its clinical significance in colorectal cancer. Immunostaining of CD163 and macrophage infiltration were evaluated in paraffin-embedded specimens, earlier analyzed for CD31, D2-40 and S-phase fraction, from primary tumors and normal colorectal mucosa of 75 patients with colorectal carcinoma. The outcomes were analyzed in relation to clinical-pathological data. CD163 expression was positive in cancer cells in 20 % of colorectal cancer patients and was related to advanced tumor stages (P = 0.008) and unfavorable prognosis (p = 0.001). High macrophage infiltration was related to shorter survival and positive CD163 expression in tumor cells. The prognostic impact of macrophage infiltration was independent of tumor stage and CD163 expression in cancer cells (p = 0.034). The expression of macrophage phenotype in colorectal cancer cells is associated with macrophage density in tumor stroma and lower survival rates. Macrophage infiltration has an independent prognostic impact on mortality in colorectal cancer. In accordance with previous experimental studies, these findings provide new insights into the role of macrophages in colorectal cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2014
Keywords
CD163 expression, Macrophage infiltration, Colorectal cancer
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-106894 (URN)10.1007/s12307-014-0145-7 (DOI)24771466 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-05-23 Created: 2014-05-23 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Svanvik, J. & Shabo, I. (2014). Review and rhyme: of birth of cancers and selfish epigenomes [Letter to the editor]. Medical Hypotheses, 82(5), 639-640
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Review and rhyme: of birth of cancers and selfish epigenomes
2014 (English)In: Medical Hypotheses, ISSN 0306-9877, E-ISSN 1532-2777, Vol. 82, no 5, p. 639-640Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

n/a

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112028 (URN)10.1016/j.mehy.2014.01.035 (DOI)000335105100025 ()24612784 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-11-13 Created: 2014-11-13 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Shabo, I., Olsson, H., Stål, O. & Svanvik, J. (2013). Breast Cancer Expression of DAP12 is Associated With Skeletal and Liver Metastases and Poor Survival. Clinical Breast Cancer, 13(5), 371-377
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Breast Cancer Expression of DAP12 is Associated With Skeletal and Liver Metastases and Poor Survival
2013 (English)In: Clinical Breast Cancer, ISSN 1526-8209, E-ISSN 1938-0666, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 371-377Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Macrophages are an important cellular factor in breast cancer (BRC) progression and metastasis. DNAX activating protein of 12 kD (DAP12) is essential factor for macrophage fusion function. This study was conducted to investigate the expression and significance of DAP12 expression in BRC. DAP12 is expressed in BRC cells and associated with poor survival, liver metastases, and bone metastases. These data provide new insight into the pathophysiology of macrophages in BRC. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanBackground: The transmembrane adapter protein, DAP12, transduces activation signals for several arrays of receptors, including human signal-regulatory protein, DAP12-associating lectin-1, triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1, -2, and -3, in natural killer cells, granulocytes, monocytes/macrophages, and dendritic cells. The macrophage-specific antigen, Cluster of Differentiation 163 (CD163), is expressed in breast and colorectal cancers and is associated with early cancer recurrence and poor prognosis. It was recently shown that fusion between intestinal tumor cells and macrophages results in nuclear reprogramming with hybrid transcripts from both cells of origin. The role of DAP12 in the fusion process is not known. This study investigates the expression of DAP12 in BRC cells, and its relation to other macrophage traits and to the clinical progression of disease. Materials and Methods: Immunostaining of DAP12 and CD163 was performed and evaluated in paraffin-embedded specimens from 132 patients with BRC. The outcomes were analyzed in relation to clinicopathological data. Results: DAP12 expression in cancer cells was positive in 66 percent of the cancers and was associated with high tumor grade (P = .015), and with liver (P = .047) and skeletal (P = .067), but not with lung metastases (P = 1.00). Patients with BRC expressing DAP12 had poor prognosis, with higher recurrence rates of skeletal (P = .018) and liver metastases (P = .047), and shorter survival time (P = .0060). Conclusion: We suggest that macrophage traits in BRC cells facilitate the metastatic process and that DAP12 expression might promote metastatic homing to bone and liver tissues.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
Cell fusion, Tumor-associated macrophages, Tissue-specific metastasis, Tumor immunology, Tumor microenvironment
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-98662 (URN)10.1016/j.clbc.2013.05.003 (DOI)000324341600010 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland||

Available from: 2013-10-10 Created: 2013-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Shabo, I. & Svanvik, J. (2011). Expression of Macrophage Antigens by Tumor Cells. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, 714, 141-150
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expression of Macrophage Antigens by Tumor Cells
2011 (English)In: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0065-2598, E-ISSN 2214-8019, Vol. 714, p. 141-150Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Macrophages are a heterogeneous cell population of the myeloid linage derived from monocytes. These cells show two different polarization states, M1 and M2 macrophages in response to different micro environmental signals. Tumor associated macrophages (TAM) represent the M2 type and promote tumor progression. These cells express antigens that more or less are specific for macrophages like: CD14, CD68, MAC387, CD 163, and DAP12. In a series of recent studies it is shown that cancer cells may express these antigens and CD I 63, MAC387 and DAP12 may be expressed by e.g. breast cancer cells. Thus, 48% of the breast cancers expressed CD163 that is a scavenger receptor normally expressed by macrophages alone. The corresponding figure for rectal cancer is 31%. The expression of CD163 is correlated to early distant recurrence in breast cancer and local recurrence in rectal cancer and reduced survival time in both conditions. Expression of macrophage antigens in breast- and colorectal-cancers may have a prognostic relevance in clinical praxis. One explanation to these findings is that resemblance with macrophages may indicate a more invasive phenotype due to genetic exchange between the primary tumor cells and associated macrophages. This is further supported by the finding that expression of DAP12, a macrophage fusion receptor, in breast cancer is associated with an advanced tumor grade and higher rates of skeletal and liver metastases and overall shorter distant recurrence free survival. Another explanation to the changed phenotype is a genetic exchange between the cells by exosome-mediated transfer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2011
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-68824 (URN)10.1007/978-94-007-0782-5_7 (DOI)000290775400007 ()
Available from: 2011-06-08 Created: 2011-06-08 Last updated: 2017-12-11
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications