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Schön, Thomas
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 57) Show all publications
Spreco, A., Schön, T. & Timpka, T. (2022). Corruption should be taken into account when considering COVID-19 vaccine allocation [Letter to the editor]. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 119(19)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Corruption should be taken into account when considering COVID-19 vaccine allocation
2022 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 119, no 19Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2022
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-192370 (URN)10.1073/pnas.2122664119 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2021-05608
Available from: 2023-03-13 Created: 2023-03-13 Last updated: 2023-05-04
Dahl, V. N., Mølhave, M., Fløe, A., van Ingen, J., Schön, T., Lillebaek, T., . . . Wejse, C. (2022). Global trends of pulmonary infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria: a systematic review. International Journal of Infectious Diseases, 125, 120-131
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global trends of pulmonary infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria: a systematic review
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2022 (English)In: International Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1201-9712, E-ISSN 1878-3511, Vol. 125, p. 120-131Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To describe the global trends of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infection and disease.

Methods: A systematic review of studies including culture-based NTM data over time. Studies reporting on pulmonary NTM infection and/or disease were included. Information on the use of guideline-based criteria for disease were collected, in which, infection is defined as the absence of symptoms and radiological findings compatible with NTM pulmonary disease. The trends of change for incidence/prevalence were evaluated using linear regressions, and the corresponding pooled estimates were calculated.

Results: Most studies reported increasing pulmonary NTM infection (82.1%) and disease (66.7%) trends. The overall annual rate of change for NTM infection and disease per 100,000 persons/year was 4.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.2-4.8) and 4.1% (95% CI: 3.2-5.0), respectively. For absolute numbers of NTM infection and disease, the overall annual change was 2.0 (95% CI: 1.6-2.3) and 0.5 (95% CI: 0.3-0.7), respectively. An increasing trend was also seen for Mycobacterium avium complex infection (n = 15/19, 78.9%) and disease (n = 10/12, 83.9%) and for Mycobacterium abscessus complex (n = 15/23, 65.2%) infection (n = 11/17, 64.7%) but less so for disease (n = 2/8, 25.0%).

Conclusion: Our data indicate an overall increase in NTM worldwide for both infection and disease. The explanation to this phenomenon warrants further investigation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Chronic lung disease; Incidence; Nontuberculous mycobacteria; Respiratory infections; Systematic review
National Category
Infectious Medicine Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-192100 (URN)10.1016/j.ijid.2022.10.013 (DOI)000965649700010 ()36244600 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding: Department of Public Health, Aarhus University; Fonden, Skibsreder Per Henriksen, R. og hustrus fond; Region Midtjyllands Sundhedsvidenskabelige Forskningsfond; Christian Larsen og dommer Ellen Larsens Legat; Helga og Peter Kornings Fond; Beckett-Fonden

Available from: 2023-03-02 Created: 2023-03-02 Last updated: 2024-05-05
Woksepp, H., Karlsson, L., Ärlemalm, A., Hällgren, A., Schön, T. & Carlsson, B. (2022). Simultaneous Measurement of 11 Antibiotics for use in the Intensive Care Unit by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring, 44(2), 308-318
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Simultaneous Measurement of 11 Antibiotics for use in the Intensive Care Unit by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry
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2022 (English)In: Therapeutic Drug Monitoring, ISSN 0163-4356, E-ISSN 1536-3694, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 308-318Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Recent studies indicate that a high proportion of patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) fail to attain adequate antibiotic levels. Thus, there is a need to monitor the antibiotic concentration to ensure effective treatment. Herein, the authors aimed to develop an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous quantification of antimicrobials to assess individualized therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM).

METHODS: A UHPLC-MS/MS method with 11 antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, benzylpenicillin, levofloxacin, linezolid, rifampicin, meropenem, cloxacillin, cefotaxime, clindamycin, and piperacillin) was developed. Chromatographic separation was performed using a Kinetex biphenyl reversed-phase column, with gradient elution using 0.1% formic acid (FA) and methanol with 0.1% FA. Sample preparation was performed using methanol protein precipitation. The total run time was 5 min.

RESULTS: For all analytes, the inter-assay inaccuracies for calibrators were ≤5%. The inter-day inaccuracies for the quality controls (QCs) were ≤5% for all analytes. The inter-assay precision for calibration standards ranged between 1.42% and 6.11%. The inter-assay imprecision for QCs of all antibiotics and concentrations ranged between 3.60% and 16.1%. Inter-assay inaccuracy and imprecision for the QCs and calibration standards were ≤15% for all drugs, except benzylpenicillin.

CONCLUSION: A rapid UHPLC-MS/MS method was developed for the simultaneous quantification of 11 different antibiotics. Minimal sample preparation was required to ensure a rapid turnaround time. The method was applied to clinical samples collected from four ICUs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Philadelphia, PA, United States: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2022
Keywords
UHPLC-MS/MS; Antibiotics; Therapeutic drug monitoring; Critically ill patients; Clinical application
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-183609 (URN)10.1097/ftd.0000000000000911 (DOI)000769195300007 ()34224537 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding: Research Council of South-East Sweden (FORSS); Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research CouncilEuropean Commission; Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation [DNR 2014/236-31]

Available from: 2022-03-14 Created: 2022-03-14 Last updated: 2024-05-05Bibliographically approved
Eimer, J., Fernström, L., Rohlén, L., Grankvist, A., Loo, K., Nyman, E., . . . Schön, T. (2022). Spiroplasma ixodetis Infections in Immunocompetent and Immunosuppressed Patients after Tick Exposure, Sweden. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 28(8), 1681-1685
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spiroplasma ixodetis Infections in Immunocompetent and Immunosuppressed Patients after Tick Exposure, Sweden
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2022 (English)In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 1681-1685Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We report 2 cases of Spiroplasma ixodetis infection in an immunocompetent patient and an immunocompromised patient who had frequent tick exposure. Fever, thrombocytopenia, and increased liver aminotransferase levels raised the suspicion of anaplasmosis, but 16S rRNA PCR and Sanger sequencing yielded a diagnosis of spiroplasmosis. Both patients recovered after doxycycline treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 2022
Keywords
Anaplasma phagocytophilum; Spiroplasma ixodetis; Sweden; bacteria; doxycycline; immunocompetent patients; immunosuppressed patients; tick-borne infections; ticks
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-191891 (URN)10.3201/eid2808.212524 (DOI)
Available from: 2023-02-21 Created: 2023-02-21 Last updated: 2024-04-12
Antimycobacterial Susceptibility Testing Group, . (2022). Updating the approaches to define susceptibility and resistance to anti-tuberculosis agents: implications for diagnosis and treatment. European Respiratory Journal, 59(4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Updating the approaches to define susceptibility and resistance to anti-tuberculosis agents: implications for diagnosis and treatment
2022 (English)In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 59, no 4Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Inappropriately high breakpoints have resulted in systematic false-susceptible AST results to anti-TB drugs. MIC, PK/PD and clinical outcome data should be combined when setting breakpoints to minimise the emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European Respiratory Society, 2022
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-192737 (URN)10.1183/13993003.00166-2022 (DOI)000810421500024 ()35422426 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85129331780 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-03-28 Created: 2023-03-28 Last updated: 2023-05-16Bibliographically approved
Kalsum, S., Andersson, B., Das, J., Schön, T. & Lerm, M. (2021). A high-throughput screening assay based on automated microscopy for monitoring antibiotic susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis phenotypes. BMC Microbiology, 21(1), Article ID 167.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A high-throughput screening assay based on automated microscopy for monitoring antibiotic susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis phenotypes
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2021 (English)In: BMC Microbiology, E-ISSN 1471-2180, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 167Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BackgroundEfficient high-throughput drug screening assays are necessary to enable the discovery of new anti-mycobacterial drugs. The purpose of our work was to develop and validate an assay based on live-cell imaging which can monitor the growth of two distinct phenotypes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and to test their susceptibility to commonly used TB drugs.ResultsBoth planktonic and cording phenotypes were successfully monitored as fluorescent objects using the live-cell imaging system IncuCyte S3, allowing collection of data describing distinct characteristics of aggregate size and growth. The quantification of changes in total area of aggregates was used to define IC50 and MIC values of selected TB drugs which revealed that the cording phenotype grew more rapidly and displayed a higher susceptibility to rifampicin. In checkerboard approach, testing pair-wise combinations of sub-inhibitory concentrations of drugs, rifampicin, linezolid and pretomanid demonstrated superior growth inhibition of cording phenotype.ConclusionsOur results emphasize the efficiency of using automated live-cell imaging and its potential in high-throughput whole-cell screening to evaluate existing and search for novel antimycobacterial drugs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC, 2021
Keywords
Cording; Planktonic; Mycobacterium tuberculosis; Whole-cell screening; Automated live-cell imaging
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-177442 (URN)10.1186/s12866-021-02212-3 (DOI)000660892500001 ()34090328 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Olav Thon Foundation; Ekhaga foundation; Swedish Heart Lung FoundationSwedish Heart-Lung Foundation; Linkoping University

Available from: 2021-06-29 Created: 2021-06-29 Last updated: 2024-01-17
Kiflie, A., Bewket, G., Abate, E., Schön, T. & Blomgran, R. (2021). Differential effects of asymptomatic Ascaris lumbricoides, Schistosoma mansoni or hook worm infection on the frequency and TGF-beta-producing capacity of regulatory T cells during active tuberculosis. Tuberculosis, 131, Article ID 102126.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differential effects of asymptomatic Ascaris lumbricoides, Schistosoma mansoni or hook worm infection on the frequency and TGF-beta-producing capacity of regulatory T cells during active tuberculosis
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2021 (English)In: Tuberculosis, ISSN 1472-9792, E-ISSN 1873-281X, Vol. 131, article id 102126Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Helminth induced expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) may take part in suppressing protective host responses during tuberculosis (TB), although Tregs functionality and link to TB disease severity remains unexplored. We investigated the species-specific effect of helminths on frequency and TGF-beta producing capacity of Tregs, and possible connection to TB disease severity. 89 pulmonary TB patients (PTB) and 69 community controls (CCs) from Gondar, Ethiopia, were included. Clinical disease severity was graded by TB score, and flow cytometry used to characterize Treg frequency and functionality measured as their TGF-beta-producing capacity. In helminth positive PTB patients (Helminth+PTB+) compared to helminth negative PTB or CCs, TGF-beta(+) Tregs were significantly increased mainly in hookworm coinfection whereas S. mansoni increased TGF-beta(+) Tregs in CCs. Treatment of TB and helminths decreased TGF-beta(+) Tregs in Helminth+PTB+ at 2 months follow-up. There were no overall differences in the frequency of Tregs in CCs or PTB unless stratification on TB disease severity was performed. At inclusion Helminth+PTB+ had increased frequency of Tregs already at low disease severity, and TGF-beta(+) Tregs correlated to intermediate-to-high disease severity. In conclusion, helminth specific increase of TGF-beta(+) Tregs in PTB patients was correlated to TB disease severity and was restored following anti-helminth treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CHURCHILL LIVINGSTONE, 2021
Keywords
Pulmonary TB; Helminth coinfection; Tregs; TGF-beta plus tregs; TB disease Severity
National Category
Immunology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-182939 (URN)10.1016/j.tube.2021.102126 (DOI)000747969300001 ()34601265 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research CouncilEuropean Commission [2017-05617, 2020-04738, 2016-02043]; Swedish HeartLung FoundationSwedish Heart-Lung Foundation [20160431, 20190484, 20150237]

Available from: 2022-02-18 Created: 2022-02-18 Last updated: 2022-05-19
Kuhlin, J., Davies Forsman, L., Mansjö, M., Jonsson Nordvall, M., Wijkander, M., Wagrell, C., . . . Bruchfeld, J. (2021). Genotypic resistance of pyrazinamide but not MIC is associated with longer time to sputum culture conversion in patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 73(9), E3511-E3517
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genotypic resistance of pyrazinamide but not MIC is associated with longer time to sputum culture conversion in patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis
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2021 (English)In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1058-4838, E-ISSN 1537-6591, Vol. 73, no 9, p. E3511-E3517Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: PZA resistance in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is common and it is not clear how it affects interim and treatment outcomes. Although rarely performed, phenotypic drug susceptibility testing (pDST) is used to define PZA resistance but genotypic DST (gDST) and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) could be beneficial. We aimed to assess the impact of PZA gDST and MIC on time to sputum culture conversion (SCC) and treatment outcome in patients with MDR-TB.

METHODS: Clinical, microbiological and treatment data was collected in this cohort study for all patients diagnosed with MDR-TB in Sweden 1992-2014. MIC, pDST and whole genome sequencing of the pncA, rpsA and panD genes were used to define PZA resistance. A Cox regression model was used for statistical analyses.

RESULTS: Of 157 patients with MDR-TB, 56.1% (n=88) had PZA resistant strains and 49.7% (n=78) were treated with PZA. In crude and adjusted analyses, PZA gDST resistance was associated with a 29-day longer time to SCC (hazard ratio [HR] 0.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.36-0.89, p=0.013 and HR 0.49, 95% CI 0.29-0.82, p=0.007, respectively). A two-fold decrease in dilutions of PZA MIC for PZA susceptible strains showed no association with SCC in crude or adjusted analyses (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.73-1.31, p=0.89). Genotypic DST and MIC for PZA were not associated with treatment outcome.

CONCLUSION: In patients with MDR-TB, gDST PZA resistance was associated with a longer time to SCC. Rapid PZA gDST is important to identify patients who may benefit from PZA treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2021
Keywords
MDR-TB, PZA, minimum inhibitory concentration, pncA gene, treatment outcome
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-173446 (URN)10.1093/cid/ciaa1509 (DOI)000720749600187 ()33011791 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding: Swedish Heart-Lung FoundationSwedish Heart-Lung Foundation [20150508]; Swedish National Research Council [540-2013-8707, 2016-02043]

Available from: 2021-02-19 Created: 2021-02-19 Last updated: 2024-04-29Bibliographically approved
Koser, C. U., Robledo, J., Shubladze, N., Schön, T., Dolinger, D. L. & Salfinger, M. (2021). Guidance is needed to mitigate the consequences of analytic errors during antimicrobial susceptibility testing for TB. The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 25(10), 791-794
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Guidance is needed to mitigate the consequences of analytic errors during antimicrobial susceptibility testing for TB
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2021 (English)In: The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, ISSN 1027-3719, E-ISSN 1815-7920, Vol. 25, no 10, p. 791-794Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

n/a

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
INT UNION AGAINST TUBERCULOSIS LUNG DISEASE (I U A T L D), 2021
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-180743 (URN)10.5588/ijtld.21.0428 (DOI)000706090100004 ()34615575 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Ministerio de Ciencia Tecnologa e Innovacion, Bogota, Colombia [221389666216 CT-783-2018]; Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation, StockholmSwedish Heart-Lung Foundation; Swedish Research Council, Stockholm, SwedenSwedish Research Council

Available from: 2021-11-01 Created: 2021-11-01 Last updated: 2022-05-19
Togarsimalimath Kotresh, S., Pushpamithran, G., Schön, T., Stendahl, O. & Blomgran, R. (2021). Helminth Antigen Exposure Enhances Early Immune Control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Monocytes and Macrophages. Journal of Innate Immunity, 13, 148-163
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Helminth Antigen Exposure Enhances Early Immune Control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Monocytes and Macrophages
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2021 (English)In: Journal of Innate Immunity, ISSN 1662-811X, E-ISSN 1662-8128, Vol. 13, p. 148-163Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Helminth and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) coinfection is common and suggested to influence the risk of developing active tuberculosis (TB). It is known that helminths in contrast to TB induce a strong Th2 response in the host. However, the direct impact of helminth antigen exposure on host immunity against TB is largely unknown. Our aim was to explore the effects of helminth antigen exposure on the early immune control of Mtb in monocytes and macrophages. Ascaris lumbricoides (ASC) and Schistosoma mansoni (SM) protein antigens were used to study the immediate effect of helminth antigen exposure in monocytes, on monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation, or mature macrophages, in the control of virulent Mtb H37Rv. Pre-exposure of peripheral blood mononuclear cells reduced Mtb growth in monocytes, especially with SM, but no Th1/Th2 cytokines or activation markers indicated involvement of T cells. Monocytes exposed before maturing into macrophages reduced Mtb growth in macrophages (ASC), and pre-exposure of mature macrophages reduced (ASC) or kept Mtb growth at control levels (SM). This in vitro model shows how helminth infection directly affects the monocyte-macrophage axis at an early stage before cell-mediated immunity develops. During acute helminth coinfection or when helminth antigen concentration is elevated at the site of Mtb infection, these helminths provide an enhanced control and killing of Mtb owing to the direct stimulatory effect of helminth antigens on phagocytic cells.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
S. Karger, 2021
Keywords
Mycobacterium tuberculosis; Schistosoma mansoni soluble egg antigen; Ascaris lumbricoides; Monocytes; Macrophages; Innate immune control
National Category
Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-172502 (URN)10.1159/000512279 (DOI)000601378500001 ()33333522 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85098111102 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council [2017-05617]; Swedish Heart-Lung FoundationSwedish Heart-Lung Foundation [2017-0620, 2019-0504, 2016-0431, 2016-0719, 2018-0615, 2019-0484, 2019-0601]; Stiftelsen Clas Groschinskys Minnesfond; Swedish Society of Medicine [SLS-499971]

Available from: 2021-01-13 Created: 2021-01-13 Last updated: 2022-05-19Bibliographically approved
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