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Abbott, A., Allard, M., Kierkegaard, M., Peolsson, A. & Dedering, Å. (2020). What biopsychosocial factors are associated with work ability in conservatively managed patients with cervical radiculopathy?: A cross-sectional analysis. PM&R, 12(1), 64-72
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What biopsychosocial factors are associated with work ability in conservatively managed patients with cervical radiculopathy?: A cross-sectional analysis
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2020 (English)In: PM&R, ISSN 1934-1482, E-ISSN 1934-1563, PM R, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 64-72Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

No previous studies have investigated what biopsychosocial factors are associated with self‐reported work ability in conservatively managed patients with cervical radiculopathy.

Objective

To develop a theoretical model of factors and potential processes associated with variation in work ability based on a thorough assessment of biopsychosocial variables in conservatively managed patients with cervical radiculopathy.

Design

Cross‐sectional observational study.

Setting

Tertiary neurosurgery clinic.

Patients

A total of 144 conservatively managed patients with cervical pain and radiculopathy participated in the study.

Methods

From 64 biopsychosocial candidate variables, significant (P < .05) bivariate correlators with Work Ability Index (WAI) were entered as independent variables in a categorical regression. Elastic net regularization maintained the most parsimonious set of independent variables significantly associated with variation in WAI as the dependent variable. Process analysis of significant independent variable associations with WAI was performed.

Main Outcome Measurement

WAI.

Results

From 42 bivariate correlates of WAI, multivariate regression displayed a total of seven variables that were significantly (F [25,98] = 5.74, P < .05) associated with 65.8% of the variation in WAI. The Neck Disability Index (NDI) and Fear‐Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire Work subscale (FABQ‐W) were significant individual factors within the final regression model. Process analysis displayed FABQ‐W having a significant specific indirect association with the direct association between NDI and WAI, with the model associated with 77% of the variability in WAI (F [2,84] = 141.17, P < .001).

Conclusion

Of 64 candidate biopsychosocial factors, NDI and FABQ‐W were the most significant multivariate correlates with work ability. FABQ‐W has a significant indirect association with baseline NDI scores and perceived work ability. This warrants future research trialing work‐related fear avoidance interventions in conservatively managed patients with cervical radiculopathy.

Level of Evidence

III

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-162843 (URN)10.1002/pmrj.12177 (DOI)000506627600009 ()31033147 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-12-21 Created: 2019-12-21 Last updated: 2020-02-03Bibliographically approved
Carlfjord, S., Landén Ludvigsson, M., Peolsson, A. & Peterson, G. (2019). Adoption of a research-based program for neck disorders implemented in primary care physiotherapy: a short- and long-term follow-up survey study. Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, 1-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adoption of a research-based program for neck disorders implemented in primary care physiotherapy: a short- and long-term follow-up survey study
2019 (English)In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Neck disorders are common in primary health care (PHC) physiotherapy. A neck-specific exercise program based on research findings was implemented among physiotherapists in Swedish PHC. The aim of the study was to evaluate the adoption of the program. We invited PHC physiotherapists to an educational session including theoretical information and practical training. Before the educational session the participants (n = 261) completed a baseline questionnaire. After 3 and 12 months, we distributed surveys to identify changes in practice and in confidence regarding diagnosis and treatment. We compared data from 3-months and 12-months follow-up, respectively, with baseline data. Self-reported frequency of most of the included assessment methods was unchanged after 12 months. Frequency of assessment of neck proprioception had increased significantly. Specific neck muscle exercise for treatment of whiplash associated disorders was applied more frequently after 3 and after 12 months than at baseline. Frequency of other treatment methods remained unchanged. Confidence in diagnosis and treatment increased significantly, particularly among women. The program was not adopted as expected, but resulted in increased confidence regarding diagnosis and treatment. The provision of a short educational session seemed not to be sufficient to obtain a sustained change in practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Education, implementation, neck disorders, physiotherapy, primary health care
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-163877 (URN)10.1080/09593985.2019.1608610 (DOI)31030585 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065158257 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-02-24 Created: 2020-02-24 Last updated: 2020-03-19Bibliographically approved
Hermansen, A., Peolsson, A., Hedlund, R. & Kammerlind, A.-S. (2019). Balance problems and dizziness after neck surgery: associations with pain and health-related quality of life. Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, 1-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Balance problems and dizziness after neck surgery: associations with pain and health-related quality of life
2019 (English)In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Symptoms of dizziness or imbalance are often present in individuals with a variety of neck-disorders. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of patient-reported balance problems and dizziness 10-13 years after surgery for cervical degenerative disc disease; evaluate associations with neck pain and health-related quality of life; and investigate how these individuals described dizziness.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty-eight individuals, 10 years or more after anterior cervical decompression and fusion surgery, who previously participated in a randomized controlled trial were included. Participants completed questionnaires including ratings of dizziness and balance problems, the Dizziness Handicap Inventory, and an open-ended question regarding their experience of dizziness. Secondary outcomes were neck pain and quality of life.

RESULTS: Seventy-two percent experienced occasional or daily symptoms of unsteadiness and/or dizziness. Intensity ratings for dizziness during movement and for balance problems were similar and rather low, but had an impact on quality of life. Ratings of dizziness at rest were even lower. Dizziness ratings were associated with neck pain. Strenuous activities were related to dizziness and dizziness was primarily described as intermittent and non-rotatory.

CONCLUSIONS: Dizziness or balance problems in the long-term after surgery for cervical degenerative disc disease are common and have an impact on daily life. Ratings of problem frequency and intensity were usually low. Dizziness and balance problems may affect quality of life. Patients' descriptions of these problems are in line with common symptoms of cervicogenic dizziness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2019
Keywords
Cervical spine, anterior cervical decompression and fusion, degenerative disease, dizziness
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-161041 (URN)10.1080/09593985.2019.1571137 (DOI)30686102 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060927284 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-10-17 Created: 2019-10-17 Last updated: 2019-12-05Bibliographically approved
Landén Ludvigsson, M., Peterson, G., Widh, S. & Peolsson, A. (2019). Exercise, headache, and factors associated with headache in chronic whiplash Analysis of a randomized clinical trial. Medicine (Baltimore, Md.), 98(48), Article ID e18130.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exercise, headache, and factors associated with headache in chronic whiplash Analysis of a randomized clinical trial
2019 (English)In: Medicine (Baltimore, Md.), ISSN 0025-7974, E-ISSN 1536-5964, Vol. 98, no 48, article id e18130Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Almost 40% of individuals with chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) report headache after 5 years, making it one of the most common persistent symptoms besides neck pain, but randomized treatment studies are lacking. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of 3 different exercise approaches on headache in chronic WAD grades 2 and 3, and to identify potential factors associated with such headache, and whether they differ depending on 3 different aspects of such headache (current headache, maximum headache, or headache bothersomeness).Methods: This was an analysis of a randomized clinical trial of people with chronic WAD and headache (n = 188), who were randomized to either 12 weeks of neck-specific exercise without (NSE) or with a behavioral approach (NSEB) or physical activity prescription (PPA). Data were collected at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months. Physical and psychosocial factors were tested for association with headache. Multivariate regression models and linear mixed models were used.Results: The NSE/NSEB groups reported reduced headache both over time and compared to PPA. Up to 51% (NSE) and 61% (NSEB) reported at least 50% reduction in their headache at 12 months. The PPA group was not improved over time. Neck pain and dizziness were associated with headache regardless of aspect of headache. The only associated psychosocial factor was anxiety, which was associated with headache bothersomeness. Other factors were mainly physical, and up to 51% of the variance was explained.Conclusion: Headache in chronic WAD, may be reduced with neck-specific exercise with or without a behavioral approach. Chronic headache was associated with neck pain and dizziness regardless of aspect tested. Other factors associated with headache in chronic WAD were mainly physical rather than psychosocial.Trial registration number: Clinical Trials.gov, no: NCT015285

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2019
Keywords
chronic; exercise; headache; rehabilitation; whiplash
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-163681 (URN)10.1097/MD.0000000000018130 (DOI)000510184300054 ()31770245 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85075688217 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Government through the REHSAM Foundation; Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council; Regional Centre for Clinical Research; Centre for Clinical Research Sormland at Uppsala University; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden; Uppsala-Orebro Regional Research Council; Ostergotland County Council

Available from: 2020-02-17 Created: 2020-02-17 Last updated: 2020-03-12Bibliographically approved
Peolsson, A., Peterson, G., Hermansen, A., Landén Ludvigsson, M., Dedering, A. & Lofgren, H. (2019). Physiotherapy after anterior cervical spine surgery for cervical disc disease: study protocol of a prospective randomised study to compare internet-based neck-specific exercise with prescribed physical activity. BMJ Open, 9(2), Article ID e027387.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physiotherapy after anterior cervical spine surgery for cervical disc disease: study protocol of a prospective randomised study to compare internet-based neck-specific exercise with prescribed physical activity
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2019 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 2, article id e027387Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction Patients suffering from remaining disability after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) surgery for cervical disc disease may be prescribed physical activity (PPA) or neck-specific exercises (NSEs). Currently, we lack data for the success of either approach. There is also a knowledge gap concerning the use of internet-based care for cervical disc disease. The scarcity of these data, and the high proportion of patients with various degrees of incapacity following ACDF, warrant increased efforts to investigate and improve cost-effective rehabilitation. The objective is to compare the effectiveness of a structured, internet-based NSE programme, versus PPA following ACDF surgery. Methods and analysis This is a prospective, randomised, multicentre study that includes 140 patients with remaining disability (amp;gt;= 30% on the Neck Disability Index, NDI) following ACDF for radiculopathy due to cervical disc disease. Patient recruitment occurs following attendance at routine clinical appointments, scheduled at 3 months postsurgery. Patients are then randomised to one of two groups (70 patients/group) for a 3-month treatment programme/period of either internet-based NSE or PPA. Questionnaires on background data, pain and discomfort, physical and mental capacity, satisfaction with care, and health and workplace factors are completed, along with physical measures of neck-related function conducted by independent test leaders blinded to randomisation. Measures are collected at inclusion, after the 3-month treatments (end of treatment) and at a 2-year follow-up. Radiography will be completed at the 2-year follow-up. Preoperative data will be collected from the Swedish Spine Registry. Data on healthcare consumption, drug use and sick leave will be requested from the relevant national registers. Ethical considerations This study was approved by the Regional Ethical Review Board in Linkoping Ref. 2016/283-31 and 2017/91-32. The scientists are independent with no commercial ties. Patients are recruited after providing written informed consent. Patient data are presented at group level such that no connection to any individual can be made. All data are anonymised when reported, and subject to the Swedish Official Secrets Health Acts. The test leaders are independent and blinded for randomisation. Exercises, both general and neck-specific, have been used extensively in clinical practice and we anticipate no harm from their implementation other than a risk of muscle soreness. Both randomisation groups will receive care that is expected to relieve pain, although the group receiving NSE is expected to demonstrate a greater and more cost-effective improvement versu s the PPA group. Any significant harm or unintended effects in each group will be collected by the test leaders. All questionnaires and test materials are coded by the research group, with code lists stored in locked, fireproof file cabinets, housed at the university in a room with controlled (card-based) access. Only individuals in receipt of a unique website address posted by the researchers can access the programme; patients can neither communicate with each other nor with caregivers via the programme. Study participation might lead to improved rehabilitation versus non-participation, and might therefore be of benefit. The results of this study should also contribute to more effective and flexible rehabilitation, shorter waiting times, lower costs and the possibility to implement our findings on a wider level. Dissemination If effective, the protocols used in this study can be implemented in existing healthcare structures. The results of the study will be presented in scientific journals and popular science magazines of relevance to health. The findings will also be presented at local, regional, national and international conferences and meetings, as well as in the education of university students and at public lectures. Information about the results will be communicated to the general population in cooperation with patient organisations and the media.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, 2019
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-158984 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2018-027387 (DOI)000471124600275 ()30782952 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|regional Center for Clinical Research; Region Council of Ostergotland County

Available from: 2019-07-19 Created: 2019-07-19 Last updated: 2019-11-11Bibliographically approved
Khosravi, F., Peolsson, A., Karimi, N. & Rahnama, L. (2019). Scapular Upward Rotator Morphologic Characteristics in Individuals With and Without Forward Head Posture: A Case-Control Study. Journal of ultrasound in medicine, 38(2), 337-345
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Scapular Upward Rotator Morphologic Characteristics in Individuals With and Without Forward Head Posture: A Case-Control Study
2019 (English)In: Journal of ultrasound in medicine, ISSN 0278-4297, E-ISSN 1550-9613, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 337-345Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives There are several reports suggesting that forward head posture contributes to alterations in scapular kinematics and muscle activity, leading to the development of shoulder problems. Currently, it is unknown whether forward head posture alters the thickness of the scapular muscles. The aim of this study was to compare the thickness of the serratus anterior and upper and lower trapezius muscles at rest and during loaded isometric contractions in individuals with and without forward head posture. Methods Twenty individuals with forward head posture and 20 individuals with normal head posture participated in this case-control study. Three separate ultrasound images of the serratus anterior and upper and lower trapezius muscles were captured under 2 randomized conditions: at rest and during a loaded isometric contraction. Results The thickness of each muscle significantly increased from rest to the loaded isometric contraction (P?<?.001). The only difference between the groups was that the thickness of the serratus anterior muscle at rest in the normal-posture group was larger than that in the forward-posture group (P?=?.01). Conclusions Forward head posture appears to be related to atrophy of the serratus anterior muscle, which may contribute to the development of shoulder problems. Further research is required to identify more about the association of forward head posture with the imbalance of shoulder girdle muscles and the impact of head posture on upper quadrant pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
musculoskeletal, scapular muscles, serratus anterior, thickness, trapezius, ultrasound
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154050 (URN)10.1002/jum.14693 (DOI)000456851600007 ()
Note

Funding agencies: University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences

Available from: 2019-01-24 Created: 2019-01-24 Last updated: 2019-03-06
Landén Ludvigsson, M., Peterson, G. & Peolsson, A. (2019). The effect of three exercise approaches on health-related quality of life, and factors associated with its improvement in chronic whiplash-associated disorders: analysis of a randomized controlled trial.. Quality of Life Research, 28(2), 357-368
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of three exercise approaches on health-related quality of life, and factors associated with its improvement in chronic whiplash-associated disorders: analysis of a randomized controlled trial.
2019 (English)In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 357-368Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: The aim was to evaluate whether neck-specific exercise, with (NSEB) or without (NSE) a behavioural approach, improves health-related quality of life (HRQoL) compared to physical activity prescription (PPA) in chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) grades 2 and 3. A secondary aim was to identify factors associated with HRQoL and HRQoL improvement following exercise interventions.

METHODS: This is a secondary analysis of a multicentre randomized clinical trial. Participants (n = 216) with chronic WAD grades 2 and 3 were randomized to 12 weeks of PPA or physiotherapist-led NSE or NSEB. The EQ-5D 3L/EQ-VAS and SF-36v2 physical (PCS) and mental (MCS) component summaries were collected together with several neck-related and psychosocial outcomes at baseline, after 3, 6 and 12 months, and were analysed with linear mixed models (all time points) and multivariate linear regressions (baseline, 6 months).

RESULTS: NSE/NSEB resulted in better outcomes than PPA (EQ-VAS and SF-36 PCS, both groups, p < 0.01) but not in a higher EQ-5D score. Improvement over time was seen in EQ-5D/EQ-VAS for the NSEB group (p < 0.01), and for NSE/NSEB as measured with the PCS (p < 0.01). Factors associated with baseline HRQoL and change to 6 months in HRQoL (R2 = 0.38-0.59) were both neck-related and psychosocial (e.g. depression, work ability).

CONCLUSION: Neck-specific exercise, particularly with a behavioural approach, may have a more positive impact on HRQoL than physical activity prescription in chronic WAD grades 2 and 3. HRQoL is however complex, and other factors also need to be considered. Factors associated with HRQL and improvements in HRQoL following exercise are multidimensional.

TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ClinicalTrials.gov, No. NCT01528579.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Chronic, Exercise, Physiotherapy, Quality of life, Spine, Whiplash
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154060 (URN)10.1007/s11136-018-2004-3 (DOI)000457880300006 ()30225786 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Vetenskapsradet [521-2014-2982]; Swedish Government through the REHSAM Foundation [RS2010/009]; Swedish Research Council; County Council of Ostergotland [LIO-533041, LIO-439541, LIO-197631, IO-276151, LIO-354241]; Centre for Clinical Research Sormland at 

Available from: 2019-01-24 Created: 2019-01-24 Last updated: 2019-03-07
Karlsson, A., Peolsson, A., Elliott, J., Romu, T., Ljunggren, H., Borga, M. & Dahlqvist Leinhard, O. (2019). The relation between local and distal muscle fat infiltration in chronic whiplash using magnetic resonance imaging.. PLoS ONE, 14(12), Article ID e0226037.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The relation between local and distal muscle fat infiltration in chronic whiplash using magnetic resonance imaging.
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2019 (English)In: PLoS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 12, article id e0226037Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between fat infiltration in the cervical multifidi and fat infiltration measured in the lower extremities to move further into understanding the complex signs and symptoms arising from a whiplash trauma. Thirty-one individuals with chronic whiplash associated disorders, stratified into a mild/moderate group and a severe group, together with 31 age- and gender matched controls were enrolled in this study. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to acquire a 3D volume of the neck and of the whole-body. Cervical multifidi was used to represent muscles local to the whiplash trauma and all muscles below the hip joint, the lower extremities, were representing widespread muscles distal to the site of the trauma. The fat infiltration was determined by fat fraction in the segmented images. There was a linear correlation between local and distal muscle fat infiltration (p<0.001, r2 = 0.28). The correlation remained significant when adjusting for age and WAD group (p = 0.009) as well as when correcting for age, WAD group and BMI (p = 0.002). There was a correlation between local and distal muscle fat infiltration within the severe WAD group (p = 0.0016, r2 = 0.69) and in the healthy group (p = 0.022, r2 = 0.17) but not in the mild/moderate group (p = 0.29, r2 = 0.06). No significant differences (p = 0.11) in the lower extremities' MFI between the different groups were found. The absence of differences between the groups in terms of lower extremities' muscle fat infiltration indicates that, in this particular population, the whiplash trauma has a local effect on muscle fat infiltration rather than a generalized.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
San Francisco, CA, United States: Public Library of Science, 2019
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-164543 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0226037 (DOI)31805136 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85076115188 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-03-23 Created: 2020-03-23 Last updated: 2020-03-30Bibliographically approved
Lo, H. K., Johnston, V., Landén Ludvigsson, M., Peterson, G., Overmeer, T., David, M. & Peolsson, A. (2018). Factors associated with work ability following exercise interventions for people with chronic whiplash-associated disorders: Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial.. Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, 50
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors associated with work ability following exercise interventions for people with chronic whiplash-associated disorders: Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial.
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 50Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy of exercise interventions and factors associated with changes in work ability for people with chronic whiplash-associated disorders.

DESIGN: Secondary analysis of a single-blind, randomized multi-centre controlled trial.

SETTING: Interventions were conducted in Swedish primary care settings.

PATIENTS: A total of 165 individuals with chronic whiplash-associated disorders grade II-III.

METHODS: Participants were randomly allocated to neck-specific exercise, neck-specific exercise with a behavioural approach, or prescribed physical activity interventions. Work ability was evaluated with the Work Ability Index at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months.

RESULTS: The neck-specific exercise with a behavioural approach intervention significantly improved work ability compared with the prescribed physical activity intervention (3 months, p = 0.03; 6 months, p = 0.01; 12 months, p = 0.01), and neck-specific exercise at 12 months (p = 0.01). Neck-specific exercise was better than the prescribed physical activity intervention at 6 months (p = 0.05). An increase in work ability from baseline to one year for the neck-specific exercise with a behavioural approach group (p < 0.01) was the only significant within-group difference. Higher self-rated physical demands at work, greater disability, greater depression and poorer financial situation were associated with poorer work ability (p < 0.01).

CONCLUSION: This study found that neck-specific exercise with a behavioural approach intervention was better at improving self-reported work ability than neck-specific exercise or prescribed physical activity. Improvement in work ability is associated with a variety of factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
FOUNDATION REHABILITATION INFORMATION, 2018
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150587 (URN)10.2340/16501977-2374 (DOI)000447771700008 ()30132011 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish government through the Swedish Research Council; Swedish Social Insurance Agency through the REHSAM Foundation Stockholm, Sweden; regional Center for Clinical Research of Ostergotland, Linkoping, Sweden; regional Center for Clinical Research of So

Available from: 2018-08-28 Created: 2018-08-28 Last updated: 2018-11-09
Amiri Arimi, S., Mohseni Bandpei, M. A., Rezasoltani, A., Peolsson, A. & Mohammadi, M. (2018). Multifidus muscle size changes at different directions of head and neck movements in females with unilateral chronic non-specific neck pain and healthy subjects using ultrasonography. Journal of Bodywork & Movement Therapies, 22(3), 560-565
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multifidus muscle size changes at different directions of head and neck movements in females with unilateral chronic non-specific neck pain and healthy subjects using ultrasonography
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Bodywork & Movement Therapies, ISSN 1360-8592, E-ISSN 1532-9283, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 560-565Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to compare the dimensions of cervical multifidus muscle (CMM) in different conditions.

METHODS: Twenty five women with neck pain and 25 healthy subjects participated in this study. The dimensions of the CMM were measured at rest, 50% and 100% maximum isometric voluntary contraction (MIVC) at six directions of neck movements, using ultrasonography.

RESULTS: The size of multifidus was smaller in patients than healthy individuals at rest state (P < 0.05). A significant smaller CMM dimension was found in the affected side compared with unaffected side in patients group (P < 0.05). The result of ANOVA for MLD showed a significant difference for contraction levels (P < 0.001) and neck movements (P < 0.001) in both groups. The MLD of the CMM was significantly different between CMM at rest and 50%, and 100% MIVC (P < 0.001). No significant differences were found between the groups at 50% and 100% MIVC (P > 0.05 in both instances). The most prominent CMM size change was observed during neck extension, flexion, ipsilateral lateral-flexion, and ipsilateral rotation, respectively (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: Results of the present study indicate that the size of CMM was decreased in patients with neck pain in rest state. The size of CMM changes in all directions of neck movements, although the most prominent was during neck extension. This points out CMM stabilization role's in different directions of neck movements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Churchill Livingstone, 2018
Keywords
Cervical muscles, Multifidus, Neck pain, Size, Ultrasonography
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154059 (URN)10.1016/j.jbmt.2017.09.011 (DOI)30100277 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-01-24 Created: 2019-01-24 Last updated: 2019-01-24
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6075-4432

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