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Grubbström, Robert W.
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Publications (10 of 60) Show all publications
Grubbström, R. W. & Hinterhuber, H. H. (Eds.). (2016). Nineteenth International Working Seminar on Production Economics, Pre-prints, Volume 1: Papers scheduled for Tuesday, February 23 2016 8.00 am to 21.15 pm. Paper presented at Nineteenth International Working Seminar on Production Economics, February 22-26, 2016, Innsbruck, Austria. Innsbruck: Congress Innsbruck
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nineteenth International Working Seminar on Production Economics, Pre-prints, Volume 1: Papers scheduled for Tuesday, February 23 2016 8.00 am to 21.15 pm
2016 (English)Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Innsbruck: Congress Innsbruck, 2016. p. 444
Keywords
Tillverkningsorganisation
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-128215 (URN)
Conference
Nineteenth International Working Seminar on Production Economics, February 22-26, 2016, Innsbruck, Austria
Available from: 2016-05-23 Created: 2016-05-23 Last updated: 2016-05-23Bibliographically approved
Grubbström, R. W. & Hinterhuber, H. H. (Eds.). (2016). Nineteenth International Working Seminar on Production Economics, Pre-prints, Volume 2: Papers scheduled for Tuesday, February 24, 2016, 8.00 am to 21.15 pm. Paper presented at Nineteenth International Working Seminar on Production Economics, February 22-26, Innsbruck, Austria. Innsbruck: Congress Innsbruck
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nineteenth International Working Seminar on Production Economics, Pre-prints, Volume 2: Papers scheduled for Tuesday, February 24, 2016, 8.00 am to 21.15 pm
2016 (English)Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Innsbruck: Congress Innsbruck, 2016. p. 540
Keywords
Tillverkningsorganisation
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-128217 (URN)
Conference
Nineteenth International Working Seminar on Production Economics, February 22-26, Innsbruck, Austria
Available from: 2016-05-23 Created: 2016-05-23 Last updated: 2016-05-23Bibliographically approved
Grubbström, R. W. & Hinterhuber, H. H. (Eds.). (2016). Nineteenth International Working Seminar on Production Economics, Pre-prints, Volume 3: Papers scheduled for Tuesday, February 25, 2016, 8.00 am to 20.30 pm. Paper presented at Nineteenth International Working Seminar on Production Economics, February 22-26, Innsbruck, Austria. Innsbruck: Congress Innsbruck
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nineteenth International Working Seminar on Production Economics, Pre-prints, Volume 3: Papers scheduled for Tuesday, February 25, 2016, 8.00 am to 20.30 pm
2016 (English)Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Innsbruck: Congress Innsbruck, 2016. p. 416
Keywords
Tillverkningsorganisation
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-128218 (URN)
Conference
Nineteenth International Working Seminar on Production Economics, February 22-26, Innsbruck, Austria
Available from: 2016-05-23 Created: 2016-05-23 Last updated: 2016-05-23Bibliographically approved
Grubbström, R. W. & Hinterhuber, H. H. (Eds.). (2016). Nineteenth International Working Seminar on Production Economics, Pre-prints, Volume 4: Papers scheduled for Tuesday, February 26, 2016, 8.00 am to 10.45 am. Paper presented at Nineteenth International Working Seminar on Production Economics, February 22-26, Innsbruck, Austria. Innsbruck: Congress Innsbruck
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nineteenth International Working Seminar on Production Economics, Pre-prints, Volume 4: Papers scheduled for Tuesday, February 26, 2016, 8.00 am to 10.45 am
2016 (English)Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Innsbruck: Congress Innsbruck, 2016. p. 200
Keywords
Tillverkningsorganisation
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-128220 (URN)
Conference
Nineteenth International Working Seminar on Production Economics, February 22-26, Innsbruck, Austria
Available from: 2016-05-23 Created: 2016-05-23 Last updated: 2016-05-23Bibliographically approved
Disney, S. M., Naim, M. M., Williams, S. J., Nussey, I. & Grubbström, R. W. (2015). Biographical-Item: In Memoriam: Professor Denis R. Towill 1933-2015 in INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PRODUCTION ECONOMICS, vol 170, issue , pp III-V (170ed.). ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 170
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biographical-Item: In Memoriam: Professor Denis R. Towill 1933-2015 in INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PRODUCTION ECONOMICS, vol 170, issue , pp III-V
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2015 (English)Book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

n/a

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2015. p. iii–v Edition: 170
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124517 (URN)10.1016/S0925-5273(15)00417-X (DOI)000367486000001 ()
Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-01 Last updated: 2016-02-09
Grubbström, R. W. (2015). On the true value of resource consumption when using energy in industrial and other processes. International Journal of Production Economics, 170, 377-384
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the true value of resource consumption when using energy in industrial and other processes
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 170, p. 377-384Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper we attempt to provide a partial answer to the question of why energy is a scarce resource. Scarcity is a fundamental concept in the science of economics. If resources, goods or services were not in scarce supply, we need not economise when utilising them. Indeed, free commodities we need not pay for, their prices are zero, we attach no economic value to them, and their supply is in abundance - at least beyond the point at which our needs and wants are satisfied. However, energy is regarded as a scarce resource, although energy - as such - is not scarce. To describe energy as a useful and therefore a valuable quantity, to which a price may be attached, energy will thus have to be characterised in further dimensions than energy content alone. Apart from quantity, there is a need for a uniform qualitative measure of energy. The obvious field to revert to for such considerations is thermodynamics, which offers a method for defining a uniform measure for the qualitative content of energy, namely exergy. Although exergy is defined from purely physical properties, it is shown to have an important role to play when comparing the economic value of energy in different forms. In particular, this paper will focus on the economic value of heat, especially heat delivered through a district heating system. The concept of exergy is defined from maximising a work output reversibly taking an infinite time. However, for processes to run within finite horizons, entropy must be generated. This leads us to add finite time considerations from examining consequences from the assumed availability of so-called endo-reversible processes. In a small case example we show that heat appears to be overpriced compared to electricity from an exergetic point of view and that this is even more pronounced adopting finite time considerations. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Energy value; Exergy; Second law; Finite time thermodynamics; Power potential
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124500 (URN)10.1016/j.ijpe.2015.07.011 (DOI)000367486100002 ()
Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-01 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Andriolo, A., Battini, D., Grubbström, R. W., Persona, A. & Sgarbossa, F. (2014). A century of evolution from Harriss basic lot size model: Survey and research agenda. International Journal of Production Economics, 155, 16-38
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A century of evolution from Harriss basic lot size model: Survey and research agenda
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2014 (English)In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 155, p. 16-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Determining the economic lot size has always represented one of the most important issues in production planning. This problem has long attracted the attention of researchers, and several models have been developed to meet requirements at minimum cost. In this paper we explore and discuss the evolution of these models during one hundred years of history, starting from the basic model developed by Harris in 1913, up to today. Following Harriss work, a number of researchers have devised extensions that incorporate additional considerations. The evolution of EOQ theory strongly reflects the development of industrial systems over the past century. Here we outline all the research areas faced in the past by conducting a holistic analysis of 219 selected journal papers and trying to give a comprehensive view of past work on the EOQ problem. Finally, a new research agenda is proposed and discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keywords
Economic lot sizing; EOQ; EPQ; Theoretical framework; Survey Research agenda
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111266 (URN)10.1016/j.ijpe.2014.01.013 (DOI)000341466000004 ()
Available from: 2014-10-15 Created: 2014-10-14 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Grubbström, R. (2014). Cumulative staircase considerations for dynamic lotsizing when backlogging is allowed. International Journal of Production Economics, 157, 201-211
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cumulative staircase considerations for dynamic lotsizing when backlogging is allowed
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 157, p. 201-211Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The dynamic lotsizing problem concerns the determination of optimal batch quantities, when given required amounts appear at discrete points in time. The standard formulation assumes that no shortages are allowed and that replenishments are made instantaneously.

For the case when no shortage is allowed, previously it has been demonstrated that the inner-corner condition for an optimal production plan in continuous time reduces the number of possible replenishment times to a finite set of given points at which either a replenishment is made, or not. The problem is thus turned into choosing from a set of zero/one decisions with 2n−1 alternatives, of which at least one solution must be optimal, where n is the number of requirement events. Recently, the instantaneous replenishment assumption has been replaced by allowing for a finite production rate, which turned the inner-corner condition into a condition of tangency between the cumulative demand staircase and cumulative production.

In this paper we investigate relationships between optimal cumulative production and cumulative demand, when backlogging is permitted. The production rate is assumed constant and cumulative production will then be a set of consecutive ramps. Cumulative demand is a given staircase function. The net present value (NPV) principle is applied, assuming a fixed setup cost for each ramp, a unit production cost for each item produced and a unit revenue for each item sold at the time it is delivered.

Among other results, it is shown that optimal cumulative production necessarily intersects the demand staircase. Instead of having 2n−1 production staircases as candidates for optimality, there are 2n−1 production structures as candidates. These are made up of sequences of batches, of which the set of batches may be optimised individually. Also is shown that the NPV of each batch has a unique timing maximum and behaves initially in a concave way and ends as convex.

Results for the average cost approach are obtained from a zeroth/first order approximation of the objective function (NPV).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keywords
Dynamic lotsizing, EPQ, Finite production rate, Backlog, Shortages, Net present value, Binary approach
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-96595 (URN)10.1016/j.ijpe.2013.05.027 (DOI)000345734100022 ()
Available from: 2013-08-21 Created: 2013-08-21 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Grubbström, R. (2014). Dynamic lotsizing with a finite production rate. International Journal of Production Economics, 149, 68-79
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamic lotsizing with a finite production rate
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 149, p. 68-79Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The dynamic lotsizing problem concerns the determination of optimally produced/delivered batch quantities, when demand, which is to be satisfied, is distributed over time in different amounts at different times. The standard formulation assumes that these batches are provided instantaneously, i.e. that the production rate is infinite.

Using a cumulative geometrical representation for demand and production, it has previously been demonstrated that the inner-corner condition for an optimal production plan reduces the number of possible optimal replenishment times to a finite set of given points, at which replenishments can be made. The problem is thereby turned into choosing from a set of zero/one decisions, whether or not to replenish each time there is a demand. If n is the number of demand events, this provides 2n−1 alternatives, of which at least one solution must be optimal. This condition applies, whether an Average Cost approach or the Net Present Value principle is applied, and the condition is valid in continuous time, and therefore in discrete time.

In the current paper, the assumption of an infinite production rate is relaxed, and consequences for the inner-corner condition are investigated. It is then shown that the inner-corner condition needs to be modified to a tangency condition between cumulative requirements and cumulative production.

Also, we have confirmed the additional restriction for feasibility in the finite production case (provided by Hill, 1997), namely the production rate restriction. Furthermore, in the NPV case, one further necessary condition for optimality, the distance restriction concerning the proximity between adjacent production intervals, has been derived. In an example this condition has shown to reduce the number of candidate solutions for optimality still further. An algorithm leading to the optimal solution is presented.

Keywords
Dynamic lotsizing, Finite production rate, Net present value, Economic order quantity, EOQ, Economic production quantity, EPQ, Binary approach
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-96597 (URN)10.1016/j.ijpe.2012.12.009 (DOI)000332439600008 ()
Available from: 2013-08-21 Created: 2013-08-21 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Bogataj, M. & Grubbström, R. W. (2013). Transportation delays in reverse logistics. International Journal of Production Economics, 143(2), 395-402
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transportation delays in reverse logistics
2013 (English)In: International Journal of Production Economics, ISSN 0925-5273, E-ISSN 1873-7579, Vol. 143, no 2, p. 395-402Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper we extend and apply MRP theory towards reverse logistics including the considerations of transportation consequences. Our aim is to demonstrate the versatility obtained from using MRP theory when combining Input-Output Analysis and Laplace transforms. This enables an analysis of a supply chain including four sub-systems, namely manufacturing, distribution, consumption and reverse logistics, where the geographical distance between the activities play an important role. The main focus in this paper is on reverse logistics (recycling, remanufacturing). Especially we wish to model the evaluation of disposal and reverse activities far away from agglomerations, which often means an improved environment for nearby inhabitants. This is also illustrated in a numerical example. We use the Net Present Value as a measure of the economic performance. Our ambition is to show that supply chain sub-systems may accurately be described using input and output matrices collected together in corresponding matrices for the system as a whole. Activity levels in each sub-system govern the speed of the respective processes, and these activity levels, in general, will be considered as decision variables. We now analyse reverse logistics activities in which the flows of materials and goods are typically divergent (arborescent processes), similar to properties of the distribution sub-system, and recent results on the extensions of basic MRP theory introducing the concepts of output delays and the generalised output matrix are also introduced here, when modelling the reverse logistics sub-system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
Supply chain; Reverse logistics; Material requirements planning; Laplace transform; Input-output analysis; Lead time; Net present value; Extended producer responsibility; Transportation matrix
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-96475 (URN)10.1016/j.ijpe.2011.12.007 (DOI)000320287100022 ()
Available from: 2013-08-23 Created: 2013-08-20 Last updated: 2017-12-06
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