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Milberg, Anna
Publications (10 of 56) Show all publications
Edvardsson, M., Sund-Levander, M., Milberg, A., Wressle, E., Marcusson, J. & Grodzinsky, E. (2018). Differences in levels of albumin, ALT, AST, gamma-GT and creatinine in frail, moderately healthy and healthy elderly individuals. Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, 56(3), 471-478
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differences in levels of albumin, ALT, AST, gamma-GT and creatinine in frail, moderately healthy and healthy elderly individuals
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2018 (English)In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN 1434-6621, E-ISSN 1437-4331, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 471-478Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Reference intervals are widely used as decision tools, providing the physician with information about whether the analyte values indicate ongoing disease process. Reference intervals are generally based on individuals without diagnosed diseases or use of medication, which often excludes elderly. The aim of the study was to assess levels of albumin, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), creatinine and gamma-glutamyl transferase (gamma-GT) in frail, moderately healthy and healthy elderly indivuduals. Methods: Blood samples were collected from individuals amp;gt; 80 years old, nursing home residents, in the Elderly in Linkoping Screening Assessment and Nordic Reference Interval Project, a total of 569 individuals. They were divided into three cohorts: frail, moderately healthy and healthy, depending on cognitive and physical function. Albumin, ALT, AST, creatinine and gamma-GT were analyzed using routine methods. Results: Linear regression predicted factors for 34% of the variance in albumin were activities of daily living (ADL), gender, stroke and cancer. ADLs, gender and weight explained 15% of changes in ALT. For AST levels, ADLs, cancer and analgesics explained 5% of changes. Kidney disease, gender, Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease explained 25% of the variation in creatinine levels and MMSE explained three per cent of gamma-GT variation. Conclusions: Because a group of people are at the same age, they should not be assessed the same way. To interpret results of laboratory tests in elderly is a complex task, where reference intervals are one part, but far from the only one, to take into consideration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WALTER DE GRUYTER GMBH, 2018
Keywords
aging; analyte; clinical interpretation; frail; reference interval
National Category
Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-145114 (URN)10.1515/cclm-2017-0311 (DOI)000423681100022 ()28988219 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Landstinget i Ostergotland Sverige [LIO-359661]

Available from: 2018-02-12 Created: 2018-02-12 Last updated: 2018-03-06
Ludvigsson, M., Bernfort, L., Marcusson, J., Wressle, E. & Milberg, A. (2018). Direct Costs of Very Old Persons with Subsyndromal Depression: A 5-Year Prospective Study. The American journal of geriatric psychiatry, 26(7), 741-751
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Direct Costs of Very Old Persons with Subsyndromal Depression: A 5-Year Prospective Study
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2018 (English)In: The American journal of geriatric psychiatry, ISSN 1064-7481, E-ISSN 1545-7214, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 741-751Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives

This study aimed to compare, over a 5-year period, the prospective direct healthcare costs and service utilization of persons with subsyndromal depression (SSD) and non-depressive persons (ND), in a population of very old persons. A second aim was to develop a model that predicts direct healthcare costs in very old persons with SSD.

Design and Setting

A prospective population-based study was undertaken on 85-year-old persons in Sweden.

Measurements

Depressiveness was screened with the Geriatric Depression Scale at baseline and at 1-year follow-up, and the results were classified into ND, SSD, and syndromal depression. Data on individual healthcare costs and service use from a 5-year period were derived from national database registers. Direct costs were compared between categories using Mann-Whitney U tests, and a prediction model was identified with linear regression.

Results

For persons with SSD, the direct healthcare costs per month of survival exceeded those of persons with ND by a ratio 1.45 (€634 versus €436), a difference that was significant even after controlling for somatic multimorbidity. The final regression model consisted of five independent variables predicting direct healthcare costs: male sex, activities of daily living functions, loneliness, presence of SSD, and somatic multimorbidity.

Conclusions

SSD among very old persons is associated with increased direct healthcare costs independently of somatic multimorbidity. The associations between SSD, somatic multimorbidity, and healthcare costs in the very old need to be analyzed further in order to better guide allocation of resources in health policy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Subthreshold depression; multimorbidity; oldest old; elderly; cost-of-illness; late-life depression
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149695 (URN)10.1016/j.jagp.2018.03.007 (DOI)000436629200003 ()29673895 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85045544057 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden

Available from: 2018-07-24 Created: 2018-07-24 Last updated: 2018-08-14Bibliographically approved
Milberg, A. & Friedrichsen, M. (2017). Attachment figures when death is approaching: a study applying attachment theory to adult patients' and family members' experiences during palliative home care. Supportive Care in Cancer, 25(7), 2267-2274
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attachment figures when death is approaching: a study applying attachment theory to adult patients' and family members' experiences during palliative home care
2017 (English)In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 2267-2274Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

Attachment theory is currently receiving much attention in relation to how adults cope with severe illness. The study aims were using the experiences of patients and family members to explore attachment figures (a central concept within the theory) during palliative home care.

Methods

Twelve patients and 14 family members were interviewed during ongoing palliative home care. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

Results

Four types of attachment figures were identified: (i) family and friends, (ii) health care practitioners, (iii) pets and (iv) God. Both non-physical and physical contact with the attachment figures facilitated a sense of security. In addition, the patient/family members and their attachment figures were described by some as a “we”, and when one part of the “we” felt insecure, this made the other also feel insecure. The patients’ unstable and progressing illnesses constituted a threat to the patients’ and family members’ sense of security. The availability of the attachment figures made them feel secure, and they could then divert their attention from the patients’ illnesses to other things in everyday life, e.g. socialising with family and friends. Some family members also had to cope with the loss of their own attachment figure, when the patient, who had previously been a source of security for them, was no longer able to offer protection and comfort due to the progression of the illness.

Conclusion

Important aspects of attachment figures in the end-of-life context were identified, and their clinical implications will be discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Keywords
Attachment figure; Palliative; Attachment theory; Patient; Family member
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-134896 (URN)10.1007/s00520-017-3634-7 (DOI)000402138800029 ()
Note

Funding agencies: Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden [FORSS-5775]

Available from: 2017-03-01 Created: 2017-03-01 Last updated: 2018-03-06Bibliographically approved
Erichsén, E., Milberg, A., Jaarsma, T. & Friedrichsen, M. (2016). Constipation in specialized palliative care: factors related to constipation when applying different definitions. Supportive Care in Cancer, 24(2), 691-698
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Constipation in specialized palliative care: factors related to constipation when applying different definitions
2016 (English)In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 691-698Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

CONTEXT:

For patients in palliative care, constipation is primarily a result of opioid treatment. Impacts from other factors related to constipation in palliative care are rarely studied.

OBJECTIVES:

The aim was to identify factors related to constipation in patients in palliative care, and then to compare these factors between patients with different types of constipation and patients without constipation.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional data on constipation was collected with a 26-item questionnaire from 485 patients in 38 specialist palliative care units in Sweden. Three different constipation groups were used; MC ONLY, PC ONLY, and MC & PC. Logistic regression analyses were used to calculate odds ratios.

RESULTS:

Patients with <3 defecations/week, MC ONLY, (n = 36) had higher odds of being hospitalized, bed-restricted, in need of personal assistance for toilet visits, and of having a poor fluid intake. Patients with the perception of being constipated, PC ONLY, (n = 93) had higher odds of having poor appetite, hemorrhoids, hard stool, more opioid treatment, less laxative treatment and of being more dissatisfied with constipation information. Patients with both <3 defecations/week and a perception of being constipated, MC & PC, (n = 78) had higher odds of having cancer- disease.

CONCLUSION:

There were several significant factors related to constipation with higher odds than opioid- treatment, for patients in palliative care, such as; hard stool, cancer diagnosis, dissatisfaction with information, low fluid intake, hemorrhoids, bed restriction, hospitalization, and need of personal assistance for toilet visits.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2016
Keywords
Constipation, Palliative care, Risk factors, Symptom assessment
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121720 (URN)10.1007/s00520-015-2831-5 (DOI)000367458200022 ()26160464 (PubMedID)
Funder
Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS), 228731
Note

At the time for thesis presentation publication was in status: Manuscript

Funding agencies: Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS); Vrinnevi Hospital Research Board

Available from: 2015-10-02 Created: 2015-10-02 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, H., Milberg, A., Hjelm, K. & Friedrichsen, M. (2016). End of Life Care for Patients Dying of Stroke: A Comparative Registry Study of Stroke and Cancer. PLoS ONE, 11(2), e0147694, Article ID 26845149.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>End of Life Care for Patients Dying of Stroke: A Comparative Registry Study of Stroke and Cancer
2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 2, p. e0147694-, article id 26845149Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Although stroke is a significant public health challenge and the need for palliative care has been emphasized for these patients, there is limited data on end-of-life care for patients dying from stroke.

Objective

To study the end-of-life care during the last week of life for patients who had died of stroke in terms of registered symptom, symptom management, and communication, in comparison with patients who had died of cancer.

Design

This study is a retrospective, comparative registry study.

Methods

A retrospective comparative registry study was performed using data from a Swedish national quality register for end-of-life care based on WHO`s definition of Palliative care. Data from 1626 patients who had died of stroke were compared with data from 1626 patients who had died of cancer. Binary logistic analyses were used to calculate odds ratios, with 95% CI.

Results

Compared to patients who was dying of cancer, the patients who was dying of stroke had a significantly higher prevalence of having death rattles registered, but a significantly lower prevalence of, nausea, confusion, dyspnea, anxiety, and pain. In addition, the stroke group had significantly lower odds ratios for health care staff not to know whether all these six symptoms were present or not. Patients who was dying of stroke had significantly lower odds ratio of having informative communication from a physician about the transition to end-of-life care and of their family members being offered bereavement follow-up.

Conclusions

The results indicate on differences in end-of-life care between patients dying of stroke and those dying from cancer. To improve the end-of-life care in clinical practice and ensure it has consistent quality, irrespective of diagnosis, education and implementation of palliative care principles are necessary.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2016
Keywords
palliative care;stroke, end-of-life-care;
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125282 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0147694 (DOI)000369552800013 ()26845149 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Stroke Riksforbund [2012-00185]; Stahls stiftelse [4813101041]; Forss [479071]

Available from: 2016-02-19 Created: 2016-02-19 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Ring Jacobsson, L., Milberg, A., Hjelm, K. & Friedrichsen, M. (2016). Gaining perspective on own illness - The lived experiences of a patient education program for women with treated coeliac disease.. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 25(9-10), 1229-1237
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gaining perspective on own illness - The lived experiences of a patient education program for women with treated coeliac disease.
2016 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 9-10, p. 1229-1237Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and Objectives

To explore the lived experiences of women with coeliac disease after attending a patient education programme, to gain a broader perspective of its influence.

Background

Adults, particularly women, with coeliac disease report suffering from poor well-being and reduced quality of life in terms of health. Patient education programmes might support and encourage them in the search for possible improvements in lifestyle and in their approach to the disease.

Design

A qualitative phenomenological study.

Methods

Personal narrative interviews with 14 women suffering from coeliac disease who had participated in an educational programme. Data analysis in accordance with Giorgi was performed.

Results

The essential structure of women's lived experiences following their participation in the patient education programme was found to be an interaction with others with the same disease, which left the women feeling individually strengthened. The interaction enabled the participants to acquire a broader view of their life with coeliac disease. As a result, this realigned their sense of self in relation to their own disease.

Conclusion

In coping with coeliac disease, it seems that women need interaction with others with the disease to experience togetherness within a group, get the opportunity to compare themselves with others and to exchange knowledge. The interaction appears to result in that women acquire an overview of life with the disease, develop a greater confidence and dare to try new things in life.

Relevance to clinical practice

When designing a patient education programme it seems important to consider the needs of persons to meet others with the same disease, and to ask them about their need for knowledge, rather than simply assuming that health care professionals know what they need.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
Keywords
Chronic disease ;coeliac disease;nursing;patient education;phenomenology;women′s health
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123585 (URN)10.1111/jocn.13123 (DOI)000374506500006 ()26814834 (PubMedID)
Note

At the time of the thesis presentation was the publication in the status Manuscript

Available from: 2015-12-29 Created: 2015-12-29 Last updated: 2017-04-21Bibliographically approved
Ekdahl, A. W., Alwin, J., Eckerblad, J., Husberg, M., Jaarsma, T., Lindh Mazya, A., . . . Carlsson, P. (2016). Long-Term Evaluation of the Ambulatory Geriatric Assessment: A Frailty Intervention Trial (AGe-FIT): Clinical Outcomes and Total Costs After 36 Months. Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 17(3), 263-268
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-Term Evaluation of the Ambulatory Geriatric Assessment: A Frailty Intervention Trial (AGe-FIT): Clinical Outcomes and Total Costs After 36 Months
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2016 (English)In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 263-268Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To compare the effects of care based on comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) as a complement to usual care in an outpatient setting with those of usual care alone. The assessment was performed 36 months after study inclusion. Design: Randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded, single-center trial. Setting: A geriatric ambulatory unit in a municipality in the southeast of Sweden. Participants: Community-dwelling individuals aged &gt;= 75 years who had received inpatient hospital care 3 or more times in the past 12 months and had 3 or more concomitant medical diagnoses were eligible for study inclusion. Participants were randomized to the intervention group (IG) or control group (CG). Intervention: Participants in the IG received CGA-based care for 24 to 31 months at the geriatric ambulatory unit in addition to usual care. Outcome measures: Mortality, transfer to nursing home, days in hospital, and total costs of health and social care after 36 months. Results: Mean age (SD) of participants was 82.5 (4.9) years. Participants in the IG (n = 208) lived 69 days longer than did those in the CG (n = 174); 27.9% (n = 58) of participants in the IG and 38.5% (n = 67) in the CG died (hazard ratio 1.49, 95% confidence interval 1.05-2.12, P =.026). The mean number of inpatient days was lower in the IG (15.1 [SD 18.4]) than in the CG (21.0 [SD 25.0], P =.01). Mean overall costs during the 36-month period did not differ between the IG and CG (USD 71,905 [SD 85,560] and USD 65,626 [SD 66,338], P =.43). Conclusions: CGA-based care resulted in longer survival and fewer days in hospital, without significantly higher cost, at 3 years after baseline. These findings add to the evidence of CGAs superiority over usual care in outpatient settings. As CGA-based care leads to important positive outcomes, this method should be used more extensively in the treatment of older people to meet their needs. (c) 2016 AMDA - The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2016
Keywords
Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment; total costs of care; outpatient geriatric care; mortality; hospitalizations
National Category
Clinical Medicine Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126830 (URN)10.1016/j.jamda.2015.12.008 (DOI)000370950000014 ()26805750 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Ostergotland Regional authority in Sweden [LIO-124301]; Linkoping University in Sweden; Stahl Foundation in Sweden [LIO-194541]; Skane Regional authority in Sweden

Available from: 2016-04-07 Created: 2016-04-05 Last updated: 2019-06-27
Ludvigsson, M., Marcusson, J., Wressle, E. & Milberg, A. (2016). Markers of subsyndromal depression in very old persons.. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 31(6), 619-628
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Markers of subsyndromal depression in very old persons.
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, ISSN 0885-6230, E-ISSN 1099-1166, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 619-628Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To investigate factors associated with subsyndromal depression (SSD) in very old persons, and to develop a model for prediction of SSD among very old persons.

METHODS: A cross-sectional, population-based study was undertaken on 85-year-old persons in Sweden. Data were collected from a postal questionnaire, assessments in the participants' homes and at reception visits. Depressiveness was screened with GDS-15 (Geriatric Depression Scale), and the results were classified into three outcome categories: non-depression (ND), SSD and syndromal depression. Data were analysed with binary logistic, ordinal logistic and linear regression.

RESULTS: With univariate logistic regression 20 factors associated with SSD were identified in very old persons, and the four hypothesized domains-sociodemographic factors, declining physical functioning, neuropsychiatric factors and existential factors-significantly related to SSD. The multivariate logistic model included seven independent factors that increase the likelihood of SSD instead of ND (lower self-perceived health, life not meaningful, problems with self-care, use of tranquilizing medication, no contact with neighbours, history of affective disorder and history of stroke). The ordinal logistic and the linear regression models resulted in seven partly different factors for predicting SSD and depressiveness, in the very old.

CONCLUSIONS: The identified markers may help clinicians with the detection, prevention and treatment of SSD in very old persons. The findings indicate the importance of a comprehensive functional approach to diagnosing and treating depressiveness in this population, and the findings might be interpreted as offering support for the coexistence of a dimensional and a categorical view on depressive disorders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127480 (URN)10.1002/gps.4369 (DOI)000374700000009 ()26489528 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden

Available from: 2016-04-27 Created: 2016-04-27 Last updated: 2018-07-26
Erichsén, E., Milberg, A., Jaarsma, T. & Friedrichsen, M. (2015). Constipation in specialized palliative care: prevalence, definition and patient perceived symptom distress. Journal of Palliative Medicine, 18(7), 585-592
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Constipation in specialized palliative care: prevalence, definition and patient perceived symptom distress
2015 (English)In: Journal of Palliative Medicine, ISSN 1096-6218, E-ISSN 1557-7740, Vol. 18, no 7, p. 585-592Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Context: The prevalence of constipation among patients in palliative care has varied in prior research, from 18-90 %, depending on different study factors.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe and explore the prevalence and symptom distress of constipation, using different definitions of constipation, in patients admitted to specialized palliative care settings.

Methods: Data was collected in a cross-sectional survey from 485 patients in 38 palliative care units in Sweden. Variables were analyzed using logistic regression and summarized as odds ratio (OR).

Result: The prevalence of constipation varied between 7 – 43 %, depending on the definition used. Two constipation- groups were found: (i) Medical constipation- group (MCG; ≤ 3 defecations/week n=114; 23%); (ii) Perceived constipation- group (PCG; Patients with a perception of being constipated the last two weeks; n= 171; 35%). Three sub-groups emerged: patients with (a) only medical constipation (7 %), (b) only perceived constipation (19 %), and (c) with both medical and perceived constipation (16%). There were no differences in symptom severity between groups; 71% of all constipated patients had severe constipation.

Conclusion: The prevalence of constipation may differ, depending on the definition used and how constipation is assessed. In this study we found two main groups and three sub-groups, analyzed from the definitions of frequency of bowel movements and experience of being constipated. To be able to identify constipation, the patients’ definition has to be further explored and assessed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mary Ann Liebert, 2015
Keywords
Palliative care, constipation, prevalence, definition, symptom-distress
National Category
Other Medical Sciences Nursing Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117184 (URN)10.1089/jpm.2014.0414 (DOI)000361880600005 ()25874474 (PubMedID)
Note

At the time for thesis presentation publication was in status: Manuscript

Available from: 2015-04-21 Created: 2015-04-21 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Ekdahl, A. W., Wirehn, A.-B., Alwin, J., Jaarsma, T., Unosson, M., Husberg, M., . . . Carlsson, P. (2015). Costs and Effects of an Ambulatory Geriatric Unit (the AGe-FIT Study): A Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 16(6), 497-503
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Costs and Effects of an Ambulatory Geriatric Unit (the AGe-FIT Study): A Randomized Controlled Trial
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2015 (English)In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 497-503Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To examine costs and effects of care based on comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) provided by an ambulatory geriatric care unit (AGU) in addition to usual care.

DESIGN: Assessor-blinded, single-center randomized controlled trial.

SETTING: AGU in an acute hospital in southeastern Sweden.

PARTICIPANTS: Community-dwelling individuals aged 75 years or older who had received inpatient hospital care 3 or more times in the past 12 months and had 3 or more concomitant medical diagnoses were eligible for study inclusion and randomized to the intervention group (IG; n = 208) or control group (CG; n = 174). Mean age (SD) was 82.5 (4.9) years.

INTERVENTION: Participants in the IG received CGA-based care at the AGU in addition to usual care.

OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was number of hospitalizations. Secondary outcomes were days in hospital and nursing home, mortality, cost of public health and social care, participant' sense of security in care, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL).

RESULTS: Baseline characteristics did not differ between groups. The number of hospitalizations did not differ between the IG (2.1) and CG (2.4), but the number of inpatient days was lower in the IG (11.1 vs 15.2; P = .035). The IG showed trends of reduced mortality (hazard ratio 1.51; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.988-2.310; P = .057) and an increased sense of security in care interaction. No difference in HRQoL was observed. Costs for the IG and CG were 33,371£ (39,947£) and 30,490£ (31,568£; P = .432).

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: This study of CGA-based care was performed in an ambulatory care setting, in contrast to the greater part of studies of the effects of CGA, which have been conducted in hospital settings. This study confirms the superiority of this type of care to elderly people in terms of days in hospital and sense of security in care interaction and that a shift to more accessible care for older people with multimorbidity is possible without increasing costs. This study can aid the planning of future interventions for older people.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01446757.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Comprehensive geriatric assessment; ambulatory geriatric care; costs; hospitalization; multimorbidity; randomized controlled trial; security
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-118967 (URN)10.1016/j.jamda.2015.01.074 (DOI)000355134100009 ()25703450 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-06-05 Created: 2015-06-05 Last updated: 2019-06-27
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